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Full text of "Delta Tour Guide and Picture Book"

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I Y'ALL COME to the great Mississippi Delta 







^HIS IS MHERE THEy . 

<Jcom»: ohe come all ^ 

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Bolivar CoantjjBoflrdocSapefvisorsiRai^morviBarr.JiitTict Z^. JeqhneWalker.chfthKr^^rK. 
Elmer fVe\/vitt,prtsiAent,aistrict 5 ^.. JimmieHe\<lel,QJmmistratoryhermit Stanton, 

districts. Jim£<IBobo, district I - JoLI?arson,ccf/brne>;.B€n frriffith.assistqhf 

attorney-, and Walt^rHerUson, district ^ , 

TKeu sau 'Welcome to Bolivc^r County, 








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Webber Earl Dorris It, son of Mrs Daphne 
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Copyright © 1978 by The Bolivar County Historical Society 



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Art Editor Leon Z Koury 

FOREWORD 

Welcome to the Yazoo-Mississippi 
Delta — a topographic feature fash- 
ioned some years ago by design of 
The Almighty. Rich in soil content 
and noted for its great agricultural 
productivity, the Delta through its 
historical heritage exerts a magnetic 
force in attracting visitors, enamored 
by the region's culture, charm and 
diversity of interest. 

Delta people are generally proud 
and often broke, but always hospita- 
ble. Respecting tradition, there is an 
atmosphere of positive, progressive 
attitude as the present unfurls and 
the future approaches. To the travel- 
er, the vacationer and explorer, we 
extend an invitation to view our 
attractions, hear our opinions, and 
romanticize in the intriguing con- 
undrum of our expanse. 

Thomas N. Boschert, President 
Bolivar County Historical Soc. 



ABOUT THE COVER 

Hezikian Nelson s snack bar is gone but the spirit of the 
Signs message lives on The little Delta boys are still 
here save one. They are (I to rj C.C. Speokes, the late 
Kenneth Poogue Billy Harris Bottle Ewing Early Ewing, 
Carl Reid Nelson, Terrell Patterson ond Asa Royal. Photo 
of little boys courtesy of Dr Tom Royal 



Published by The Friends of the Burrus House under the 
sponsorship of the Bolivar County Historical Society, 
recognized by the Internal Revenue Service as a 
non profit tax exempt incorporated organization. AM 
money received from the sale of this publication will be 
used to save and restore The Burrus House C 1859 Bolivar 
County s only remaining ante-bellum mansion-type home 
and one of the few left in the delta It is owned by the 
Boltvor County Historical Society 

All work on this publication has been volunteer No 
salaries have been paid to anyone In the interest of the 
promotion of tourism help was given toward the cost of 
printing by the Bolivar County Board of Supervisors, tfie 
Humphreys County Board of Supervisors the Agricultural 
and Industrial Board through the Department of Tourism 
and the Hills and Delta Tourist Council 

We regret the death of R C (Bob] Malone m August The 
story of his beloved Scotland Plantation is in the Parade of 
Plantations with a picture of Mr. Malone by the tree he 
gave to the Mississippi Delta Chapter, DAR. 
VJ5 





Tommy and Eva Ann Boschert 



EXECUTIVE EDITOR 
MANAGING EDITOR 
Delta Area Editor 
Art Editor 

Consultant on Tourism 
Chiefs of Advertising 



Vera Speakes 

Lynda Lee Stock 

Ruth Wiggins 

Leon Z Koury 

Peggy McCormick 

Frank Unkel 

Eustace Wmn 

Business Manager Betty Jeon Conger 

Contributing Editors Louise Berry Moyhall Emmo 

Lytie, Ohve Edwards Mildred Pepper Dot Bryant. 

Roy Riddle Virginia Hatcher Early Ewmg Jr., 

Marian Eddins Frank ie Lawler Guinn Weathers. 

Ruth Bobo Nona Herbert Rosemary Jacobs Mary 

A Semmes, Norma Stewart, Betty Montgomery 

Guinn Weathers Carol Murat 

Photographers Vera Speakes Lynda Lee 

Stock Ruth Wiggins 
Photography Laboratory Charles Speakes 

Advertising Rosemary Jacobs, Margaret Jackson 

Smith Betsy Winn, Hazel Mills Garland Mills Bob 
Terry Jomes demons Betsy Wmn, Astenno Corter 
Martha Ann Martin, Claudine Gory Manon Eddins 
Frank ie Lawler, Solly Weathersby Sue Terney 
•Elizabeth Kellum 

Evelyn Burns Chorlyne Watson Aimee Hammond 
Eloise Smith Mary Fullen Adelle Payne Lynn 
Eastland Jane Roberson Bobby Boyd Dorothy 
Lynn Dor by, Mary Walker Agnes Barry Gladys 
Castle Eva Ann Boschert Tommy Boschert Linda 
Douglas Mrs. John Letchworth Elizabeth Mur- 
phree Billie Dunn, Wanda Fowler LaPoint Smith 
Jane McClain Comdr Robert Collins 
Contributing Photographers Estelle White Minor 

Gray Fontaine Johnson 
Circulation LL Stock E M. Barry Eustoce Wmn 

Allene Yates Tommy Boschert Joe Eddins Sonny 
Sprogins Virginia Hatcher Lola Denton Frank 
Unkel Margaret Jackson Smith Evelyn Burns Betty 
Montgomery 



TRAVELERS * TOURISTS * VISITORS 



From the Governor: The Hon. CLIFF FINCH 



From GEORGE WILLIAMS of the 



DEPARTMENT of TOURISM of the 



AGRICULTURAL and INDUSTRIAL BOARD 



From CHARLIE CAPPS of the 
LEGISIJVTIVE COMMITTEE on TOURISM 



The Honorable Cliff Fincfi 



GREETINGS 
WELCOME 



and 



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TO THE GREAT STATE of 



MISSISSIPPI 



and the Delta 



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This page is sponsored by Delta Cooperative Compress, 

Greenville, Mississippi. 



Here sit the Lord Mlrili 

5Yt\/lB0LS OF HIGHEST HOHOH AViO \NTtGV^\lY m DE IT A TOWNS," 






M.J. Dattel, Rosedale 



W.C. Burnley, Greenville 





J.W. Fore, Hollandale 



Gladstone Mortimer. Belzoni 



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Preston Riley, Boyle 



J.L. Hatcher, Benoit 



MA \ 

Martin King, Cleveland 




Morris L. Pritchard, Charleston 








Robert Wright, Inverness 



T.M. Boschert, Duncan Merlin S. Richardson. Anguilla Phillip Fratesi, Indianola 



CLEVELAND, MISSISSIPPI 
VISIT US AND SEE 




Try U» For Si»e 
Deltsi Htsiutc^ University 



FOR INDIVIDUALIZED CAMPUS TOURS, CONTACT THE DSU OFFICE OF ADMISSIONS 
PHONE: 601 -843-4073, THE UNION, ROOM 208 

Ad sponsored by DSU Alumni Association 







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AUBURN 

Auburn Plantation on Highway 1 at James, 
south of Greenville, in Washington Cunty leads 
the Parade of Delta Plantations because, 
although It was chopped up and sold by pieces 
between 1876 and the late 1880's, it was "put 
back together" by 1890 with the same 
boundaries it had when it was "put together" 
between 1834 and 1838 by Davis Montgomery 
and It has remained intact since, 
BIGGEST PRIZE 

In addition to the acreage and boundaries 
being the same, the foundations of the 
buildings there in the 1800's are still there— in 
ruins and remnants, but there. An eight foot 
wide slave-made road to an old river landing, a 
cemetery dating back to 1837, concrete 
evidences of an ante-bellum mill and a gin are 
all there. The biggest prize of all, an ante- 
bellum map of the layout of the entire 
plantation, is in the possession of the owners, 
Murry Alexander and his mother, Mrs. Andrew 
Alexander, Sr. 

Mr. Alexander used the map to find the old 
brick footings and floors. He said the reason 
they are intact under the top soil is that the 
headquarters portion of the place, after the 
buildings fell down, was made into a pasture 
and no heavy and deep digging equipment has 
disturbed the bricks. The remains are not 




A Delta resident doesn't have to own or work one to be affected by the crop. The kyiitty-giitty of the Delta economy i^oes up 
and down with rice, cotton and soybean production and market prices. 

We love our Delta plantations. They represent one of the largest area concentrations of working ones in the United Slates. 
You're in for a treat. Here they are. 



(or supervisors), Buckner's two sons, Davis and 
James, were in Company D-28th Mississippi 
Cavalry during the Civil War, The company 
once camped on the Burrus property in Bolivar 
County. Another Buckner son, Richard, who 
was also in the army, drowned April 21, 1863 
while swimming his horse across Granicus 
Bayou when Union troops landed to take the 
slaves away from Auburn 

Davis Buckner married Amanda Worthington 
of Wayside Plantation, Their youngest child 
married Joseph Robb of present day Avon, Ms. 
Twoof their children. Joseph H. and Ida L.. live 
in Greenville. 

Doctor Buckner died in 1872. In 1876 his 
heirs began to sell parts of Auburn and by 1888 
the Buckner family had sold all of their interests 
in the place. In the meantime, during the 
1880's Morris Rosenstock of Greenville began 
buying the parcels from different people and it 
was he who put it back together in one 
plantation again 

As a whole plantation, it was sold several 
times until the present owner's grandfather, 
H.N. Alexander, bought it in 1916. The younger 
Mr. Alexander found the old map, made in 
1876, in the archives of the Alexander Lumber 
Company. He used the map to locate the 
plantation doctor's house, the warehouse, gin, 
road and small levee. 

Murry Alexander has unearthed much history 
on Auburn. But many thanks must go to Mr. 
Rosenstock for 'putting her back together" 
again 




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obvious but an archaeological student, by 
following the 102 year old map, can find 
everything. 

DROWNED 

The place was sold by Montgomery, who 

fought at New Orleans with Andrew Jackson, to 

his sonin-law. Dr. Thomas Buckner. a member 

of the first Washington County Board of Police 



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This story came from my grandfather and he 
said It was absolutely true- 
After the Civil War, the two Cooke sisters, 
Miss Medora and Miss Eliza— a lot of people 
called her Miss Meliza— had only a horse left. 
His name was Selim. 

During the hot summer following the war, the 
two sisters were afraid they were going to lose 
him because the mosquitoes were about to eat 
him up. They had plenty of Osnaburg, the 
coarse cotton fabric with the moats and pepper 
trash still in it that was used for pick sacks, so 
they decided to make Selim a suit of clothes to 
cover him up. 

They were good seamstresses and they even 
made him a hat to keep the mosquitoes off his 
head. 

They got Selim out of the pasture and put his 
clothes on him. When the other horses saw him 
as they turned him back into the pasture, they 
were so afraid they ran as hard as they could. 
Selim, anxious to catch up with his pals, ran 
after them as hard as he could. The harder 
Selim ran, the harder the pals ran. In no time 
flat, all the horses disappeared— out of sight. 

None of the horses were seen again for two 
weeks. When Selim finally got back, he only had 
his hat on. 



Greetlru^s from Betsy an<l Eustace Winn of Wmn-BQrPlQy\toiloviaj.w<^«/^Awa. 



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PERMITS 




SOUTU'S 
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SMEDES PLANTATION 

The last "dog trot" house in the South Delta 
is on Smedes Plantation near Onward, east of 
Highway 61. It is easily recognizable by its six 
chimneys. 

When President Theodore Roosevelt came to 
the Mississippi Delta on his famous bear hunt in 
October, 1907, his private car was sidetracked 
at Smedes. For a little bit of civilization, he was 
a guest of the Ratliff family who lived in the dog 
trot house with the six chimneys. When 
Roosevelt went into the canebrakes with the 
bear dogs and guides, all protocol was left 
behind. He didn't even want to be called "Mr. 
President". He preferred the title of "Colonel". 
Yes, he killed a bear. , ttcon 




GEORGANNA PUNTATION 

Georganna Plantation, east of Gary, is part of 
a U.S. Land Grant acquired by David Hunt of 
Jefferson County in 1833. Owned by the Hunts 
until it was sold in 1911 to Dr. S. Goodman and 
T.H. Powers, who became the sole owner in 
1936, the plantation is now part of the Powers 
Company and managed by the Powers' grand- 
son, Charley Weissinger. 

David Hunt inherited his first property from 
an uncle, Abi|ah Hunt, who came from New 
Jersey to become one of the largest merchants 
in the Territory. In 1811, Abiiah Hunt and 
George Poindexter, later the governor of 
Mississippi, had an argument over politics and 
the disagreement resulted in a duel in which 
Hunt was killed. 

On Georganna still stands one of the identical 
southern mansions that David Hunt built on his 
property which extended from Cary to the 
Mississippi River. The mansion on Lockwood 
was destroyed by the tornado of 1971. The 
beautiful bricks were made on the land where 
the houses were built 

ONWARD PLANTATION 

A mile west of Onward, off Highway 61, you 
will see a plaque by the roadside. It reads. 



"Hill's Plantation. U.S. Admiral Porter's 
gunboats reached this luncture of Black Bayou 
and Deer Creek March 6, 1862 in Steel's Bayou 
Expedition. Sherman camped here, then moved 
north to protect boats from the C-S Army". 

The plaque is on Onward Plantation which, in 
1800, was one of the Delta Estates Plantations 
owned by Harry H.W. Hill of New Orleans, 
Louisiana. The other plantations of Delta 
Estates were Reality, Good Intent, Kelso, 
Omega and Dixie. The property in the Delta, 
around Yazoo City, and tn other states, along 
with a million and a half dollars, were willed in 
1853 to Harry Hill's son, James Dick Hill. 

While Jimmie Dick was a medical student in 
Paris, he married Laura, a French girl. Upon his 
return to the Delta, he built a house of 
Williamsburg architecture for her on Onward. 
The five dormer windows and early Spanish 
influence suited the southern climate. Laura 
did not come here to live so the house was 
never finished. Her story is told in her book, 
"Laura; of the Blighted Life". You will enjoy 
visiting the house. 

This part of Onward Plantation is rented by 
Ben Lamensdorf of Cary from the owner, Mrs. 
Bernard Pearl of Vicksburg. 




KEYHO-WATSONIA AND BLANTON 

At Blanton, 12 miles south of Rolling Fork on 
61, IS the land recorded .in the deed books as 
Watsonia on Deer Creek. It was a working 
plantation when Lewis Watson of Tensa Parish, 
Louisiana bought it and named it Watsonia in 
1833. An ante-bellum map shows the gin on the 
creek bank, dwellings, stables, offices and a big 
two-story store. Equipped with horse drawn 
machinery, the gin, which was used as a barn, 
was there until 1968. 

Dr. G.T. Darden bought Watsonia in 1892. 
Today Keyho-Watsonia Plantation is owned by 
Mrs. Elizabeth F. Montgomery who inherited it 
from her aunt, Mrs. G.T. Darden. 

Blanton Plantation is owned by Burt Darden 
who inherited it from his parents, the Alfred 
Dardens. Keyho-Watsonia and Blanton Planta- 
tions are making crops every year as hard as 
they can with modern equipment: 




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CLOTHESLINE ART AT KNOWLTONS 

Pole Knowlton, Sam Dove Knowlton, Maury 
Stafford Knowlton and Stuart Lytle, familiar 
names on Needmore Plantation at Perthishire, 
are gone. Flying the Knowlton banner near ttie 
junction of Highways 1 and 32 is Emma 
Knowlton Lytle, artist and sculptress, the last 
of the family at Bienaime, the home named to 
honor the French family nearly wiped out in the 
St. Bartholomew massacre of the Huguenots in 
the 15th century. An ancestor of Mrs. Lytle's 
through her mother. Susie Gibert Knowlton, 



was a Bienaime, the only family survivor of the 
massacre. 

In the Delta since 1889, three generations of 
Knowltons made crops. The plantation is a 
working one producing soy beans, cotton, 
wheat and barley. Mrs. Lytle extends an 
invitation to visitors and fellow Deltans to visit 
her studio at Bienaime on Needmore. Fine art 
in paintings and sculpture are on exhibit at this 
plantation gallery. The Lytle works have been 
widely sold but her paintings of cabins and the 
colorful clothes lines are especially well known. 



OGDE NpUNWIOW 

The sprawling Ogden Plantation, situated 
just south of Beulah along the bank of Lake 
Beulah and the Mississippi River front, is 
composed mainly of Woodlawn and Glenwood 
Plantations. 



When Joseph Sillers brought his family to 
Bolivar County in 1854, he bought Glenwood on 
what IS now Lake Beulah, but was then the 
river. Fearing the caving banks on the river, he 
sold it and bought adjoining land which he 
cleared and named Woodlawn. 

Mr. George L. Gayden bought Glenwood and 
the Gayden and Sillers children grew up 
together. 

In 1880 Walter Sillers, son of Joseph and 
Matilda Clark Sillers, married his childhood 
sweetheart, Ida Gayden of Glenwood. Thus the 
plantation came back into the Sillers family. 

After Ida Gayden Sillers died in 1883, 



Glenwood and Woodlawn were joined under the 
name of Woodlawn. Through the years as more 
land has been added, the plantation, which is 
still owned by the Sillers family, has been 
operated under the name of the Ogden 
Plantation. To this day, however, Glenwood and 
Woodlawn are identified within the operation 
by their original names. 

The Sillers family is proud of the fact that 
Woodlawn, the land cleared from the virgin 
forest in 1854 by Joseph Sillers, has never had 
a lien on it; not even during the starvation 
period of the Reconstruction Era. 





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A ^PopO-SMflNfS PARADISE j . . . - 





R.C. Malone by the historic cypress tree which 
is nine feet in diameter and 152 feet tali. On the 
Gervin Place, adjacent to Scotland, the tree 
was given to the DAR by Mr. Malone at the time 
of his ownership- 



The 2000 acre Scotland Plantation, owned 
and operated by the R C, Malones of Cleveland 
is north of the Beulah Cemetery on Highway 1. 
For the prominent Scott family of Rosedale, it 
was named Scotland Farm in 1893. 

Edgar H. Woods purchased the place in 1935 
and in 1942 the late J.T. Robinson and Mr 
Malone bought it, with Malone becoming sole 
owner in later years. 

It is known for its Black Angus cattle, 
productive soils, and high yielding crops, 
especially cotton. The plantation also produces 
gram fed catfish. 

Scotland is a sportsman's paradise. In 
addition to the catfish ponds, it also has a duck 
pond Each year there is the annual dove hunt 
on the plantation. Friends of the Malones enioy 
the social activities during opening days of dove 



season when they come from Tennessee, 
Arkansas, Louisiana and Mississippi. The Loui- 
siana Caiuns serve their best seafood dishes 
the night before opening at the Harry Malones 
in Cleveland A brunch at the Cleveland 
Country Club before the 12 p.m. shoot-off is 
traditional. 

A memorable occasion at Scotland was when 
the Malones' friends helped them entertain 
their new Brazilian friends whom they met on a 
South American trip. The guests fished on the 
plantation, then lourneyed the short distance to 
the Conservation League on Lake Beulah for a 
fish fry of Scotland produced catfish. 

Assisting in the operation of Scotland Plant- 
ing Company are A.L. Frazier, manager, and 
Durwood James, herdsman. 



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On Highway 1, |ust north of Winterville and 
facing Williams Bayou, Is the plantation home 
known as Loughborough. In 1834 the United 
States issued a land grant to William W. 
Blanton and John Hill Carter, In 1839 the land 
was sold to Samuel Burks with the stipulation 
that It always be known as Loughborough, the 
family name of Carter's wife. Since that time, 
the plantation has passed from Samuel Burks 
to his daughter, Eliza Burks Mosby and her 
husband, Gervals Mosby, to their daughter, 
Caroline Mosby Montgomery and her- husband, -• 
John Malcolm Montgomery, to their daughter, 
Frances Montgomery Payne and her husband. 



Beckwith B. Payne. At present, Loughborough 
is owned by Malcolm L Payne. Mrs. Francis 
Payne, Mrs. Montgomery Payne, William M. 
Payne and Hugh G. Payne. William Mosby 
Payne, Jr. represents the sixth generation of 
the family to operate the plantation. His 
daughter. Trudy, represents the seventh gene- 
ration of the family to live at Loughborough. 
The pecan orchard set out by John Malcolm 
Montgomery is still bearing. The cemetery on 
the plantation has gravestones with names of 
people who -lived in the community in the late 
nineteenth century. 







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In 1867 William Reynolds Campbell, Jr. cut 
his way through canebrakes to reach a site on 
the banks of Williams Bayou m Bolivar County 
which was to be his home. He married Miss 
Sophie Johnson of Lexington, Kentucky and 
named the plantation "Woodland". In 1939 
M.L. and W.M. Payne acquired the property 
and changed the name to "Avondale". The 
plantation, only two miles from the levee break 
which caused the 1927 flood, was completely 
inundated and the receding waters left a 



deposit of sand averaging two and one half feet 
deep Since 1939, the Payne Brothers Partner- 
ship has worked to reclaim the land. The M.L. 
Payne home stands in a grove of trees and was 
formerly the dwelling of Mrs. Louise Campbell 
Miller and her husband. Dr. Hugh Miller. The 
W.M. Payne home, a mile west, is on the site of 
the house built by William Reynolds Campbell, 
Jr. In the yard, on the north side, stands a huge 
native pecan tree which must have been there 
when Campbell cleared the land in 1867. 




BOUVRP, C0U.1MTY SlWCe J8b7 



Rf\NIMVlllMII,im V, mK\>JllHH.PAYt 



THE WILKERm of HllMTlM&TON.nJ (EIFIOH 



PU\mAT10NS 



Jefferson Pinckney Wllkerson, Jr., a cotton 
farmer, Is the fifth generation of his family to 
own, farm and live on Clifton Plantation near 
WInterville. 

Samuel Burks, of English descent, bought 
Clifton in 1839 from William W. Blanton who 
received the U.S. patent on It in 1834. Burks 
also owned Loughborough Plantation. In 
Leicestershire England, Clifton and Loughbo- 
rough are neighboring towns. 

From Burks the plantation passed on to 
subsequent generations; first, to his only child, 
Eliza Glover Burks Mosby, then to Caroline 
Pleasants Mosby Montgomery, then to Caroline 
Mosby Montgomery Wllkerson and her 
husband, Jefferson Pinckney Wllkerson, who 
had four daughters: Catherine Cameron W. 
Bryan and Frances Montgomery W. Ellis, both 
of West Point; Josephine Adams W. Splars of 
Oceanside, Ca and Caroline Mosby W. Hamil- 
ton of Jackson. The Wilkersons' only son, 
J.efferson Pinckney Wllkerson, Jr. married Ida 
Judson Harrold and they have two daughters, 
Helen Weddle W. Skelton and Princella 
Elizabeth W. Nowell, the sixth generation to be 
part of Clifton. Their children, the seventh 
generation at the plantation, are Jefferson 
Pinckney Wllkerson Skelton, Emery David 
Mitchell Skelton, Judson Harrold McClelland 
Skelton and Caroline Elizabeth Nowell. 

During the War Between the States, the 
family's gold coins, silverware and jewelry were 
hidden in a cistern on the plantation while 
Capt John Malcolm Montgomery, the father of 
Caroline M. Wllkerson, served with the Confe- 
derate forces Workers on the place claim that 
<he money is buried under the side of an old 
tree which does not leaf out until after the other 
side of it does and which loses its leaves tsefore 
the other side does! 

Clifton was covered with water during the 
1927 flood. In 1931 the plantation home 
burned. In 1973, the log cabin built by Burks 
burned when the house built around it caught 
on fire. Wars, floods, fires, epidemics and 
depressions come and go but a crop is 
produced on Clifton every year. 

Peter Wllkerson and his wife, Polly Miller, 
who settled on Huntington Plantation (now 
Huntington Point Hunting Club) in Bolivar 
County, had one child, Thomas Jefferson, who 
married Elizabeth Cornelius Thomas Jefferson 
and Elizabeth are buried in the Huntington 
Cemetery at Huntington Point as are two of 
theirchildren,Thomas Jefferson, Jr. and Irene. 
Another son, Charles Lee, later moved to 
Vicksburg and still another son, George Wash- 
ington, and his wife, Catherine Adams, remain- 
ed there to rear their children who were 
Princella Adams, Frances Josephine, Harry Lee 
and Jefferson Pinckney, who married Catherine 
Mosby Montgomery of WInterville. Jefferson 
Pinckney and Catherine Mosby lived on Clifton 
Plantation where they reared four daughters 
and one son, Jefferson Pinckney Wllkerson, Jr. 
who resides and farms there now. 



During the lifetime of the present Mr. 
Wilkerson's grandfather, George Washington 
Wllkerson. the family was forced off Huntington 
Plantation by the Corps of Engineers to build a 
new levee. They were paid seventy-five cents 
an acre for their land. 

The cisterns, graveyard, gin chimneys and 
old sawmill in the Huntington Point woods that 
members of the hunting club often speak about 
are the remnants of the Wllkerson plantation 
that goes back to 1830. 

Catherine Cameron Wllkerson Bryan, sister 
of the present Jeff Wllkerson, received an 
interesting letter in 1951 from a former tenant 
of Huntington Plantation, one Anne Lindsey of 
Little Rock: 

Mrs. Kittie Bryan, this annie yas mam truly 
did nurse your dear father and my mother 
worked for Mrs. Kittie, your grandmother and 
your grandfather Capt. George Wllkerson and 
Mr. Tommie (Wllkerson) ws the oldest son of my 
Mrs. Elizabeth Wllkerson. She was never 
married before she married your great gran- 
father. Your great granfather owned all of the 
place called huntington from the River back five 
miles he owned about 300 colored people his 
house had a fish pond up over the too stone and 
when the River come so close to the leave the 



new levie was built Then Mr Charley (Wllker- 
son) the third son had his house built over on 
the other farm and made a little town it was 
belong to them and your father It was |ust 3 
son and one girl she died young she was name 
miss irina Wllkerson. The Wllkerson owned a 
large store on the old place and it was name 
Wllkerson landing they never bought nothing 
on credit everything came c.o.d. the kat adams 
a big boat run from Memphis teen it was owen 
by your fathers mother, also the deam adams a 
big boat, they sold them and Mr Charley 
Wllkerson owen a big family boat. 

Now Mrs Holy Mecalf can tell you all of them 
so can Mrs. doctor Miller i dont know where 
they come from for they were their before the 
war. name of Cornelius was some of your great 
grandmother name i know it her maden name 
but I never did see him. one of the older 
Wllkerson was shref in Washington County once 
so Mr. Holy Mecalf said. 

It was 2 cemetery on the place it was so long 
after your grandfather died the people staid 
thire they owen about 400 head of cattle milk 
cows too men and my aunt was the woman 
milker Elen Daves, in next I tell you more Anne 
Lmdsey thank you and God bless you and your 
family I am 81 years old as of gannuary 




t>,:^> 




•6GT CHEESE £>cracHers 
*S>ee Tue old wood bojf 
for ice & 5c\ltinecxt 

TWO SBRGERS \ASedto 

cutKair herefrom K.oor4 
'tA nnvdntc^ht. 



Store 

»cor/ie set- nRiiftu antivue 

,COK\e PR\HK Ok COKe 

• Luojk Ohlhe o\<ipiwe floor 



^x 





GRCETINGS from GflNIER BROTHiRS 

CHftROLAlS BREEDERS 
HOLLflNORie, MlSSl^SlPPf 

GENU" a*vJ EIKGRNUR 



i^^XE^5SX$,£5S5^(g5gX$,25fX^O^^^O^i?,5^^ 



atSioUa// Miisissippi in Coahoma Counts 





Q 




U//20 c/eayed cc or a//)e?t. 



gy upgisg stovall dOyiEY 



My great, great grandfather, Col. John 
Oldham, bought the place shortly after the 
Treaty of Dancing Rabbit Creek in 1832. It is an 
original grant. The plantation was first called 
Port Royal after the nearby river town where 
legend has it the last of the river pirates were 
made to walk the plank into the Mississippi 
River. The town must have soon loined them 
there for Port Royal disappeared and no one 
knows |ust where it went or where it was. 

The plantation is now called Prairie for the 
big field, the core of the place, which was 
cleared at a time beyond the memory of man. It 
was probably farmed by the Indians My house 
was built in 1847. The first one burned It is 
built of bricks made on the place and timber cut 
from the woods. Because it is protected by a 



d'Oyleij hoione or) Pra.'/rie P/a^tatcon, 



private levee, it has never been under water 

Praine Plantation produces cotton, soybeans 
and peanuts. Inside the boundaries is a game 
preserve which is host to wild turkeys and deer. 



Only a mile from the house fishing is good on 
the Old River. 

This land has been m my family a long time 
and I hope the tradition will continue 



GQEEMLmT HAMATIOK 




VmxnXjxXJLon harm 0)$ SamuzZ kl(^^zd S^unvton {1S66-I947) and Eagania {Vaagkan)^ 
EfiarUan (757^-7956), u)ko wc/ie fitoAdd and majuiicd In Amdtia. County, VAJiglnia, 
and Cjomo. M bfvidz and Qfioom to tivo, on GUdZiitta^^ PLantatlon, tliAzt mULcA^ 
iouthtcut oi Avon In WaihA^ngton County tn Vtc&mbeA, 1901. T/ie hou&t, buitt 
-in 1916, banned in 1976. Thz land ovomd by M4. and Mha. Manton noM beZongi> 
to theAA 6on and daughter., WtUtam kl(^Kzd Wianton and Thy^za (B-ianton) 
McCottum. 



THl^ OLD HOUSE r^ 



I Rr ALlFN^ VftTTST 




The EM. Yates Plantation near Duncan, 
Mississippi, is the site of a weatherbeaten old 
house on Hushpuckena Creek which was the 
home of Andrew Jackson Donelson while he 
lived on his Mississippi Delta plantation The 
site received formal designation for listing in 
the National Register of Historic Places in 
1976. 

DR. PERCY WYNNE 

Andrew Jackson Donelson bought the Delta 
plantation from A.M. Boyd in 1857 While the 
house was tjeing built, he stayed with a 
neightior. Rev Daniel Crenshaw, grandfather 
of Dr. Percy Wynne, formerly of Shelby, 



The Donelson House 
Photo by Or Pete Walker 

Mississippi, and now of Houston, Texas. 

The house is a typical, hospitable- looking 
plantation "Big House" which was apparently 
built around a log cabin already on the site. In 
Donelson's time, fruit trees and grape aubors 
were part of the house setting. 

After Donelson's death in 1871, several 
owners had the plantation. Among them were 
Donelson's son, Martin, and later, Isom W. and 
James Fennell, and William T. and Marion 
Simpson. Immediately prior to being purchased 
by the Yates family, the plantation was owned 
by Captain J.T. Lovingood and was known for 



years as the "Lovingood Place." 

J W. Yates, Sr , of Shelby, Mississippi, a local 
planter and business man, tiought the planta- 
tion from Captain Lovingood in December of 
1912. It has remained in the family ever since, 
currently the property of his son, J.W. Yates, 
Jr., also of Shelby, Mississippi. 

In times past, cotton bolls from a field just 
north of the Donelson House were supplied in 
cellophane envelopes to Mrs. Salome Brady, 
manager of the gift shop at the Jefferson Davis 
House, Beauvoir, in Biloxi, Mississippi, for sale 
to tourists on the Mississippi Gulf Coast. 









DUNCAN 



First settled in early 1850s 
by Col. James Brown. Named 
Kbr an early settler Robert 
Duncan, and incorporated 
in 1890, Andrew Jackson 
Donelson, nephew of Pres. 
Jackson, owned a plantation :: 
near here. 



Historical Markor on Hwy. 61 
Photo by Thomos N Boschort 



Pp^i^p^sQp^s^p^s^p^sQp^sQp^^p^sQp^s^p^sQp^sQ^^ 












Cladmere, a frame house, had huge walls, 
spacious dining and drawing rooms, wide 
staircases, shuttered windows, handsome 
brass and crystal chandeliers and elaborate 
cornices; still considered plain, though, in 
comparison to Mount Holly. 

After changing owners several times. Cald- 
mere was bought by Joshua T. Skinner in the 
early 190O's from a Tennessean who. when he 
went back to Tennessee, took the chandeliers 
and cornices with him. Perhaps they are still 
there, safe. 

It IS said that the Caldmere Plantation home, 
c. 1855, was built by the uncle of Margaret 
Johnson Erwin Dudley, the builder of Mount 
Holly whose father was Henry Johnson If this is 
correct, with the two mansions jDeIng built the 
jSame year, it Is interesting that the one. Mount 
Holly, was (and is) palatial while the sister 
home, Caldmere, was so plain for that day and 
time. The difference In the taste may be 
explained by the fact that Mount Holly was built 
for a lady, Mrs. Dudley, and Caldmere for a 
man, her uncle. 

Skinner, who was the first lawyer in the 
Barefield Colony (Hollandale), was first struck 
by the beauty of Lake Washington when he 
visited Hugh Foote at Mount Holly. For 30 years 



the Skinner home on Caldmere was the center 
of social activity on the lake. 

Fire destroyed this home in 1930 leaving the 
brick walls and chimneys of the ground or 
gaming floor intact. After stag sessions on the 
gaming floor, those who imbibed too much to 
manage the high steps to the main house often 
slept there. 

Chapman Skinner, son of Joshua, and his 
wife. Mary Sillers Skinner, reconstructed a 
modern one story home on the remaining 
foundation, the only alteration made to the 
standing brick wall being the addition of two 
feet in height. During the rebuilding, a secret 
vault containing a Caldmere slave inventory 
with ages, condition and prices of each and also 
a list of farm equipment and supplies dating 
back to the Civil War times were found. 

The Chapman Skinners resided there until 
his death in 1944. The home burned completely 
in 1973. Mrs. Skinner, who resides in Rosedale. 
leases Caldmere. a cotton plantation, to Larry 
Dunnaway and his sons who have farmed it 
many years. 



^sQff^sQP^sQP^sQp^ 



LAliIll&(g COLE FARMS 

RoUrei.QoYLE.MS. 

QYowers of 



mm\ 



\(/e 



nl 




;V/5it( 



el comes v/5itoirs 

d^eat place, l^cr 



BCrBRM Plf\rffATlONaii[GYPI REE PlftNTRTlON 

CONN I e B. a^r^R , Carolyn q.a^rw strong, louisc- B.V/^ughn 

rV\R. OkVod lV\RS,tvl.p.0VACKEL&.jR. 



Bee Bayou Plantation was bought in 1932 by 
Martin D. Buckels, Sr. In clearing the land, he 
found that nearly every tree was a "bee tree". 
Bee Bayou was the natural name. 



Egypt Ridge Plantation, which derived its 
name from the fact that it could grow and 
supply corn to Other plantations under water 
during floods before there were levees, is on a 
ridge east of Benoit which was above flood line 
It's a cotton plantation but also produces 
soybeans. 





^\W Pirate^ 



before ,;/^ 
SeTTLfRS vi 







^iQp^sQff^s^p^sQ^>^sQp^,QP^sQp^^p^sQp^^ 



rheSujam'5 hOUy KNOVyE pLANTf^TlOfJ ^^^^^^»^^^^' 



The Swam family, long Identified with Leiand, 
acquired Holly Knowe In 1880 when Sam R. 
Swain bought it from the Jeff Davis Land 
Company. Cleared and farmed by Sam's son. 
William B. Swam, it was inherited by the late 
Walter B. Swam and Is now owned by Virginia 
Witte Swam (Mrs. Walter B, Swain). There have 
been five generations of Swains farming and 
living on Holly Knowe, so named because there 
was a knoll of holly trees on the place. Through 



the years Holly Knoll became Holly Knowe. The 
mansion residence of Mrs. Swain was built In 
1901 and remodeled In 1923 during the time of 
"dollar cotton". 

Holly Knowe produces cotton, soybeans, 
wheat and pecans. It lies five miles east of 
Leiand on Bogue Phalia which means Slow 
River in Indian language. The plantation, 
residence and grounds surrounding It are 
beautiful. 

Home o( Mrs. Waller B Swain on Holly Knowe. 





John 



L „ Kntherine Mvres Pearson (Mrs. 
PlantaVion workers. Kotnerine , 
Pea.on...,an..^s.^on..e..^-^c^_ 



Slater Myres. pose 1 



FUMT41M 




Baleshed Plantation, now owned by heirs of ^^^ part of the Carlisle Plantation owned by Dr. acre's. He owned 668 slaves. He raised corn and 

Joel Slater Myres, was once the largest Stephen Duncan of Natchez. cotton. The bales of cotton were stored in a 

shipping port along the Mississippi River |n 1335, Doctor Duncan purchased this land shed on the river bank from which the 

between Memphis and New Orleans. Baleshed and four adjoining plantations totaling 8440 plantation received the name "Baleshed". 






prociucer of 



CATFISH 



on the Sunflower R'wex 




ai\i 



RICE 



-vj ' -\J •— O 



? 
? 



* -^J 



CROWE FM^S 
tNlPIRt ?INV\T/\T10N 




k^)^,£5SX2^5gX$,25^X^0^^^^^2^^ 



down 8oY<l \Am Is 





Closeuvof plantation home 



SincethelMO's 




Plantabonheadcjaaiters "Busu 




thehome of the Wcxlters.Bobos & Havwthoynes 



Boyd Lane Plantation has been farmed and 
owned since the 1840's by Dr. and Mrs. O.L. 
Deen and their descendants. The name is 
derived from a plantation road referred to by 
local inhabitants of the early 1900's as Boyd 
Lane. This road was named for William Carroll 
Boyd, a Canadian who, as a boy, came south on 
a Mississippi River boat, settling first in 
Arkansas and later in Concordia, near Gunni- 
son. 

When the War Between the States began, he 
enlisted in the Confederate Army and went with 
the other local soldiers to board a river boat A 
little girl of nine years, noticing that he had no 



family with him, kissed him goodbye and told 
him that he could be her soldier. Remembering 
this through the long, hard years of fighting, he 
came back to Concordia after the war and 
eventually courted and married her. She was 
Sally Ella Deen, daughter of the O.L. Deens. 

For four generations, the plantation has 
passed down from parents to daughters. 
Present owners are Eleanor Boyd Walters, 
head of the Mathematics Department at Delta 
State University, Mary Adele Walters, manager 
of the Valley Bank at Gunnison, and Ruth 
Walters Bobo (Mrs. J.E. Bobo), daughters of 
Mr. and Mrs. J.E. Walters. Mrs. Walters was 



Mary Loudie Boyd. 

General managers of Boyd Lane are James E. 
Bobo and Gary L. Havrthorne, husband of 
Carroll Bobo Hawthorne, next generation heir, 
and father of Gaye Leigh Hawthorne and Jason 
Campbell Hawthorne. Since 1963, the produc- 
tion manager has been Leo Barnett. 

For several decades, the bookkeeper and 
supervisor of labor was Mary Davis Wachter 
{Mrs. Edd Wachter) who is widely known as 
"the cucumber queen" because of her success 
in raising cucumbers during the years the 
plantation produced them. She is now semi- 
retired, but lives near enough to the plantation 
office to keep an eye on everything that goes on. 

W Ruth Walters Boto 



'Federal lani lBavil,:t-^oc<^z^^ 



ClAReHCFLBECiCHAM,OR. 



Zn rcol life, as In 
the plarttdtlons- 








Servim foanties of SoliV/AR^Cb^homflJunicft 



s!!l 



WELCOME VISITORS ^^, TO THF MlS515Sippi DELTft 



Stop by oar new headaaorters 




|lV1fl6NOUft, 
OP MISSISSIPI?! 




T'l^ 




U 




r-LT^y^^-^ 




People are not a^heels.Th^ industnous make the uuheels qo round so that 
life IS possible^ better than ehdumble, and ux)nderfutmfact. 





i« ir 


It 


^ 




'vS' 






DR EUSTACE WINN, JR. 



GENE GANIER 



CARMON VALENTINE 



JOHN WHITE VALENTINE 



'JBP*^ 







:M^ 



-v 



^p 



\ s 



DR NELSON HAMILTON 






DR LEON LENOIR 



ALTON O. LEWIS, SR. 



HOWARD AND MARY ELLEN WHITE 










^CZZ^^ 




'W^M^ 



f.t 



/ 



MRS. J. A, (MISS PEARL) CLIFTON 



JOE B, DENSON 



BUTLER DENTON 



JAMES F, CHISM 

[Continued on next page] 



WHEELS Continued 




ALFRED BUTLER 



CHARLIE CAPPS 



H.E. (ED) COLEMAN 



Our GTa.T:^3yi 3v , K-aly 6^yS: 
sHOPATUSERTrSaPtmRHIT 

SUlnfloWET Rd.4 l1.B0W(X)k 



*rJ 


^^*. 


J 


%^'^^'>1 






-cU 








JAMES T. DAVIi 



TOMMY BOSCHERT 





'/^ 



^ W"*'*"^ 



^^mmP"^^ 



■nik a 



DUNCAN COPE 



The ft- Ball 

With all KirAs of insut"av\c€ ~ 




(jbh H- Cossar i9K-i<?*o; 




If yoa CQ^u 
jast make 
ft to 

Cleveland^ 
well be 

theve 
wait i no 
for youL 

HOLIDAYBIN 
Hwy^l S 

Clcvelan^s. 

iXJeue Qot 
i^ all: 

color TV 
V«^lo«at>on 

IViehilu 

U'a Kery\p 
inf)ffcepey 



[Continued on next page] 



WHEELS Continued 





RUSSEL CRUTCHER 



ANCIL COX 



DR. KENT WYATT 




OB. WOOTEN 



TORREY WOOD 



FRANK O. WYNNE, JR. 



JOHN ALDRIDGE 




WHEELS Continued 




BROOKS ALEXANDER 



BILL ALEXANDER 



DR. FRANK REESE 



WALTER ROTHCHILD 



The Tour Guide Couldn't 

Have Been Without The 

Advertisers, And They 

Were Pretty Cheerful 

About It. 

PATRONIZE THEM! 




®- 



dL ]dt of people 

to the Stein (Hart 



Wt'ARETHE Discounts 



Visit 0. (QKKJvnarK 

ih the Delta 

ai<l VVaShirwjJ-onAoe, 
powHittWNiwoFfme^ PARK 
«GrNvaie»Ms.ph.535-ll86 




DR ANDY REESE 





DR. TOMMY ROYAL 



WILLIAM M. PAYNE 




PRESCRIPTIONS 

FILLED PROMPTLY 
AND ACCURATELY . . . 

CITY WIDE DELIVERY 




FOR YOUR NEXT PRESCRIPTION 
ASK YOUR DOCTOR TO DIAL 

YOUR REXALL DRUGGIST 

247-1121 

Nights - Sundays - Holidays 
247-2714 
FILMS • COSMETICS • SICK ROOM 

SUPPLIES • PHOTO SUPPLIES 
• TOYS • BABY NEEDS • GIFTS 

TURNER'S 

DRUG STORE 



102 Jackson 



BELZONI 



P9 



[Continued on next page] 



l26> 




ALL ROADS 

LEAD TO 
BELZONI 

APRIL 1979 






INVIIES WERYOME TO B^aOMI BECRUSE 
COIVE >^PRIL, "THRT \S WHt'RgTHE HRPPEN\N& ARE 



VISIT BELZONI'S 

CATFISH 

FESTIVAL 

Great fun is in store for your 
entire family April 1979 at 
Belzoni's famous Catfish Fes- 
tival. You can enjoy the finest 
in prepared catfish dishes . . . 
with all the trimmings. 

Catfish farming is big busi- 
ness in Mississippi; worth some 
$20,000,000.00 annually. 
Belzoni is proud of it's share of 
this important industry. 

So join us . . for the finest 
catfish dinner you'll ever have, 
and for the finest in banking, 
see us ot Guaranty. 










DR. JOHN ESTES 



THE BOB MclNTOSHES S FAMOUS DUCKS DEL SPEAKES WARTHEN 



ROBERT TERRY 



WENDELL CHUDY 



COTTON BOILBRWETN 

^HORT oRoeR^- Hooie Ffi/vie Hot -1 ivnOif/t 







peoQie OH th^ go-go 

iXJo-rtt 0, vnotel (n the \<aouj 'U,noiJJ 

Like 



Call aheai 
io be sure 

4<'i-55l-44l( 







LUe haue good 

spots for 

im\)e\ir\a^ h«rrn*(ts, 
too 







StiVehope <foy^ ioYx^'a Ka-iA. ^o he ^pJfJhome DuXi if you. 
do -qeZr BLinG& 60?<? 441,GVee\v\?il»<,M5. J870| 

TowmffiN^ Tou/if4frfo«Hmf ON7Ht-MlSS.|>-m»9UT/Wlfi' 

[Continued on next page] 



WHEELS Continued 






HUGH ELLIS WALKER 



STEVE BLACKBURN 



DR RUSH B. MILLER 



EUSTACE H.WINN, 
OLDEST DIRECTOR OF DELTA ELECTRIC 



-wTi^ 



EMMETT MILLS 






GARY MEADORS 



■'^-^ 



H.L, NOWELL 



A 



Coca-Coia 60TTU W6- Co..y«€nt»"At< 



JEFFREY LEVINGSTON 



.<^ 



o^^<? 




oi 



CorwPAMY 

FREe TOUiP, 
Worlds \or^est ptrocesso/ 
Qtt<) ilstrtbutoK of: 

CATF\SH. 

Call for TouirInf<?rmQt(o>7 

tOI-827-220t 

OR WRITE OY COME BY 
BOX85,M0UflNDflLe,MS. 



Mrs. Alton Stubbs, ^Vesnient 

Myi.C(iflyles Fiorahell\,\/icefr»s»4en"t 
Mrs.BucK Da\/tSjTt-easu.rtr 
Mrs, R u.«.\ Tar n cr, Stcvetav t/ 
Urs.J.CLoM^ 

Mrj.lorftPecK 

MrsJoV^n Broter 

nrsJ.W.Bvisto- 

Klrs.LelAi^)rou.n^ 

Mrs. Bo^ecDurrtStde. 

Wrs.W.D.Rrnold 

HrS.H'E.M'Gxilln 

Wrs.DonRobcrsoi^ 

I'lrs.RuthRobtr^oM 

MlrsTcrr-yf?uSicll 

MYS.Char\«jRuS5tll 
inv$.H»\r»sBr*ant 
r<ir5. ltob«v'^D« w 



wrs.JacK Land 



See 

Levee. 

oar <rRR 

oar ^/?op5 



1 



(y 
R 

c 

T 
I 

6 

S 

p 
R 
O 

•>- 
H 

H 
o 

E 

/^ 

£ 

S 

c 
I 

u. 

& 



/ 



(oca -' Gf\aJ\ 




Tf il J hot tuhen uox 
96t to Sreev»v(ll<Ms. 

[Continued on next page] 



M29X 



WHEELS Continued 




BILL WEATHERS 



NED MITCHELL 



GARLAND MILLS 



VIVA MclNNIS AND HER FOUR GIRLS 




MALCOLM NORWORD 



LAWRENCE MELLEN 



DANA MOORE 



NOTICE TO lOMRlSTS 

Baker iimplemewt 

(s not selling S.riei;er intends 

5 ell i ng, c ookware » o/cn s i 



WE SELL To FARMERS 
MflSSEY-FERauSON NEW HoLlPiND 




Two^r? qtNavt>%s in fwrm f<?ai p»r»e«t 

BRKERIIYIPLFMENT CO, 
Hl6HWAy 82 EftST 




BILL O HARE 




J.W. MIXON 



ARTHUR Mcintosh 



if /ou love gan5> 

it's 
■at re^^ ones 

rpu-tje L box 4-3 

bend(tms.^si25 



[Continued on next page] 



i31 



WHEELS Continued 






VARDAMAN MOORE 



NONA WATSON 



ROY THORNTON 



FRANK UNKEL 








GEORGE WARTHEN 



RICHARD STOVALL 



ANDREW WESTERFIELD 



LEROY THOMAS 



JOE WEILENMAN 




neeci to c<x\\ 

FOWltRTV-^MIAUCf 

. Qox Sl7, '?a>lro<i<ASt. 

^ ^^ 





_,QOO Q o a I 



IT N\f^Y|\leeD To GO TO THE 

SIVIITHSONIAIM 

Wfc' HftVt- COLOR 'm/^NSiSTOi^^ 
Re lv\OTfc - RC R- Ccvl 1 75^'^ 5^? 

>••••••••• 32 •••••••••••••• 



TliE 
CROWN 

at the 
Antique Mall 

lunchtQns Tmcs -Sat. 

Bu Reservation Ohlq 
phone 887-252Z 

iMOJftNOLft 
M«SSiSS i pp I 



[Continued on next page] 




DOWN 



,IVJS. 



YOIILI 



irfi 



CO 



Citizens Bonk. 

GTrust Company 

BELZONI. MISSISSIPPI "^036 ' 



,3.»j;*aBfl6**' 



^iiilllllPIl' 



»>lu 




m-mp%%-%-mmm% • • • • 



WHEELS Continued 




BOBBY STEINREID 



US REP. DAVID BOWEN 



IRBY TURNER 



CHARLES C. SPEAKES 



HUGH SMITH 




MORRIS SIMPSON 



C.E. (CHARLIE BOY) WILLIAMS MRS ROBERT WHITFIELD 



PHILLIP WIGGINS 



BROTHER WILSON 




ROftf\ Yoar Htiw) TO YoanoEs 

we CAN ou.TF\T Yoa aT 

ii.eM0HAMtD'5D[PAPJIV|9(rsr,«E 

BEaON\, MISSISSIPPI 



% w 




BUFORD WILLIAMSON 




"fowh of Dahca^o 
e"t u.uia'^'^^'^m the 

Mi'sslsslppi DeltflL 

Ihcorforatci Feb.l^ilWO 

'^^^^^'''tm. B05CH£RT 
Aldermen: 

S. H.ftrNSV^^oRTH 
T L.FULiiLovi£,5R. (*i 

P.O. HOt COMB, HI 

E.L.^A?MURCHY,J<?. i)l 

C.F» SMITH 

Duncan-Qvn Ite-^ town • ki 



/»>! 



>V 



WILLIAM ADAMS, JR. 



[Continued on next page] 



WHEELS Continued 




BRADY COLE 



LARRY WIGGINS 



LePOINT SMITH 



DR BILL SPRAGINS 



WILLIAM PARKER 



GUY SIMPSON 



PURVIS RICHARD 



EDWARD HESTER 



^a6:J^ 





^ruru 



■'"<>" '''' 



of qreetK/ilie.ws, 
phone: 352-0^^1 





RICHARD DENNY SHELBY 




JOSEPH G, BARNES 



DAN HEWINS 





6^REEKJVILLE 
LUMBER CO 

FOR aU bmlima wiatenals 
Call33Z-l631-ve <l«liVtr 



IContinued on next page) 




CmUTr BUILDING MRTERIMLS 

30\ IM'5HflRP£ AVE-. 
•DRRWEW 310 

3 9>7 5a. 



JL^ (Ui^ ii VJi 





JEFFa5EY 

holaiKiodown lixmber 
cb 











(i 



\ 



\ 



i. 



i 



WHEELS Continued 





MRS HENRY (PATTY) BIZZELL 
MIS5 0RABIZZELL 
MRS. LEE BIZZELL 



WILLIAM ANDREW BELL, JR. 



THE SONNY BLAKEMANS 



KLINE BEDWELL 



JOHN RAYMOND BASSI 





MICHAEL BARRY 



MR. E.M. (BOY) BARRY 



RAYMOND BARR 



MARY ANNE LINDSEY 



ADLIA MORGAN 



At Bolivar Insurance 

©we offer 
more than just a 
friendly -^^ 




Bolivar Insurance Agency has been serving 
the insurance needs of Bolivar County and the 
Delta since 1907, so we know how to go about 
helpin^ uur customers when they need us. 
We've built our reputation on prompt, 
courteous service. Come talk to us and see just 
what we can do for you. 

Bolivar Insurance 
Agency, Inc. 

Ned Mitchell, CPCU, president 
843-2747 Commerce Building Cleveland 






BUELL NUNNERY 



HENRY T CROSBY 



OLDEST /mague flucaon/fotse /n Mfss. BELIO N\,MS- 



Gt'BUTvfUL ai>*1i<;juES -GftRG'^iNS Galore 





[Continued on next page] 



p«37m 



WHEELS Continued 



M I 





;. ' 



THOMAS WILSON HAYES 



ALLEN PEPPER 



KIRKHAM POVALL 



RUFUS PITTS 






TERRELL PATTERSON 




WILLARD SAMUELS 



MORRIS BLOCKER 



TRAVIS SATTERFIELD 



DOSSIE SHOOK 



J—n — LJ o □ a — a — ^ — a — o a Q 






OU^ether 'dk a yayd or a picxjntat/on 
you. Keep , c^eVe ^ot t/?e. "^ro.55 - (^ 

JOHN Dec RE 



^ Sa.l£5& Service [* 
PH-. 332-gioe, 




FARSVlfRS TRACTOR CO.JNC 

HWY. «2 G/^ST 

GRt e N V\\_i.e,iV»lSS, 



/r£) MO0R£ /^lOWS MORW 



c 
c 



c 

c 



lJ □ D □ 



cj r-1 a_a jzL 



JOHN PEARSON 




WALTER HERBISON 







\ 



WINSTON HAYLES 

[Continued on next page] 



M38M 



DfliaiMWMENI COMPANY 

and aS50ciate(J corpo rotioifis 











Delta Ivripkvn?nt, felling f«T/< DdtaWpltifttinitAcitooGty 
Planters £<|uipment,CltN/eUn<i Missloo t't|jUip»Tjtnt,VicKsbar«? 



»»l)l 






WHEELS Continued 




NORMAN HENRY 



JIMMIE HEIDEl 



JOHNNY HAYLES 



FONTAINE JOHNSON 



MEL HANKIN50N 




j^^i 



^ A 



■:*. .:.:>^Ms,r^ !ijifi/iii^i-^ i$-:«:<iS 




MR S MRS EDWARD HARRIS 



MM. JORDAN 



CHARLES CLARK JACOBS JR 



ROBERT JOHNSTON 



^aUJi aU , J>.u/J: X^j/ -^^ 

The Bank^f /eland is qn 

OJiouiyyiA JtAat J^ 
hcUL 3/9VlNgS 

plaios \iomf\ n'glnt 
dou/htoCXC^ 

ttereso. I the Bank 
plan forf^ou. \ Q^Lcland 







p. O. Box 386 
Leiand, Mississippi 38756 



LeltaGream Donat mh 

p ho vne: 843-3930 



Hot rflKiflLfS ih SHUCKS 
FRESH ^\\K 

DECOR flTfcP CRK'ES 






Out-ot-Staters traudui^ /YUA/.6f 
mo^K^ ^e^ciJhyZ stops here. 



[Continued on next page] 



M40M 



WHEELS Continued 




^^ 


c\ 


F^ 


i ^^ '^ 


/ 


C^^^H 


-J* 


— ^ n^HH 




JACK HATCHER 



MR S MRS TOM MOCIRE 



GERALD JACKS 



OLIVER GREENHAW 



GENEGANIER 
ELIE ROGERS 




MRS DELBERT FARMER 




MR 8 MRS IRA D FOWLER 




DR HENRY JUDSON JACOB 



ED JACKSON 





^ 







OeltdBaildinqMaterial Co. 
\ilHG OP BUILDING 
MATe\^\F\LS 
S5-ow.BR0fl0WAY 

phon€i32-542l 




VIRDEN JONES 



BfN GRIff ItH 



aooooSf^.^, Una^rRoof 



•Lumeb-p..RoofiHG. 

•PLYWOOD. StDiNG.PftiKT 

•OooRs 'SCReews 



\A/E MRKE 

-X- Roop TRUSSES 
^ DOOK UN(T5 

Tilfll332-542l 

[Continued on next page] 




Washington County 
Board of Superviso 



Industrial, Agricultural and 
Trade Hub of the Delta 



Lonzo Peacock 
Lon Pepper 
Jan Acker 
Fred Neal 
Virgil Sandifer 



'HEELS Continued 



-^~wi 













M.C. GATES 



ELLIS GRIFFITH 




DR. 8. MRS. JACK W. GUNN 




DICK HOLMAN 




<ass 



BOYD ATKINSON 




JOE EDDINS 



STEVEN LEVINGSTON 



DOMINIC RIZZO 





VMIH* 



SAVINGS & LOAN ^- 
ASSOCIATION r^>LlL 



DOWNTOWN GREENVILLE SOUTH GREENVILLE i lELAND CLAHRSOAlE 



SidpjeOdtotih^oc'iztio'n 





&mmfr IheDeltg Since 







jContinued on next page] 



H43' 



WHEELS Continued 




BUCK FULLEN 



ANNE McCASLIN HOUSE 



JIMMIE HOUSE S DELTA CATCH 



THE ELTON HORNES 



ELMER PREWITT 



LELA KEMP 



CAPT. L T KEMP 



J DRUE LUNDY 



FRTgr^Ayrrr ' MOT^^ ^^ si?iTTr ~i 



LU 



COUNT THEM 

rrn'RE Involved" 

Wtih a lot of Wonder fal ftople 

c.^^ B. MOORtk gifts for CQchotit 

A.€t CLs he to you ?va/<k a selectccn. 

m fiWe B£flUTlHlL ^o'^JronT ST. 

Jia£i50/i/£S^ox rvs WA /t INOIflNOLH.MS. 



n-/ 






CO 

O 



1:3a 



^33 



>^ 



n- 



HUGH WALKER IVY 




MRS, BARKLEY (MISS ETHEL) LITTC 




\ 



JACK LAND 




SAM lANGSTON 

[Continued on next page] 







SwFPXlf (Co.llEC. 



ClEVEll\MT),MlS5ISSlFf 136131 

P.O.Box ^ 89- Phone -S-l-?- ma 



c^^ ^S 




"^voa^ 



Not tvei^Y House WE ^ OS six 

SLEN0b-R^28 FEET 10M6 COiUW 

OS Tiie surras house ded. 

U)E Gl\/£ EVERY HOUSE SPECIftL 
/\TreNT10W-KJEW COMSTRacn(?N 
OR QLP. 





100 YEARS OLD -IH?*^ 
CrKha CHURCH 
ROSEDAue:.tv\s. 



TheBu.rrusHoui€,C.iS59, ou^neA by Boliuar Counts 

Historical Societo. Ohly cvMte-b«lliAm rwoinsion 
\Y\ countxj. On Motional RcQist€r, 



M(i 



WHEELS Continued 



ALFRED LEVINGSTON 



LONNIE LOFTON 




WALLACE LITTON 



GEORGE UNDERHILL 



MRS, JOSEPH WATT YATES, JR. 




MR JOSEPH WATT YATES, JR, 



JOSEPH W YATES, III 



R.C, MOUTON 



BEN CONGER 



BOB NUNNERY 



r 



Over 60 Years of Research 
To Provide You With 




Originator's Cotton Seed 



DELTA & PINE LAND COMPANY 



Home Office Scott, fvfliss 38772 
Ph (601) 742 3351 



Southwestern Div Lubbock, Ten 79401 
Rt 1, Box 110, Pfi (8061762 0534 



Western Div Brawley, Calil 92227 
Ptl (714)344 5520 




LON BOOKER 



[Continued on next page] 



|46( 



WHEELS Continued 




F-^ 




P ^ 




F^J 


W^ 


% J 



\Jf > 




LEE Mccarty 



ROSEMARY JACOBS 





LUCKY US— JIMMIE HOUSE HOUSEBOAT 




HENRY McCASLIN. SR. 




HENRY McCASLIN. JR. 



devel-oL-nd St ate "Bank 

Look ma /^fUv Your Monea 
OfFlCEV^S FDic 

O.I>.PftftV^Sori , first Vic«pv<$U«»\t 
^•F« Tl?P\T, Vtc« -pv-<t»i«nt 8, CashlCt* 
JOHMSTON ViOO'D, Vic«.fv«5iAeni 

0«OROI: U' WftRE.JR^SJitUnt v/ita-jpres. 
MARV M.pPiTE, as5i$tant cASKier- 

JlMWVlb- ff.XRV I M .acc^uhtma officer 
N-i..CftSS«8RV,JR. 






H.L. SL EDG-e 



JOHN PARKINSON 



Leon L. Kour u ^ 

peT.sori'al mgtructlo'n 



gCULPTUyS 



^KSTCHINC 



PAINTING 

phone 35?- 1512 




\T GWtS R0SE^/1^RY TACOBS, AU.EME Yf\TES, HAZEL MILIS, 
SW\I\RY V/ALKtR MUCH PLEft5U-Rt TO PRESENT TH 







Wayne Shonnon Orr III son of the Wayne Orrs of 
Clorksdole and grond ot the Normon Henrys of 
Clevelond 



Joe Ross Sr Sorabeth & Michael Ross Grond 
children o* Mr & Mr^ Joe Ross 




James Farnsworth Young, Jr , son ot ine james 
Farnsworth Youngs of Dallas and grand of Mrs. 
Poul Evans Sexton and Mrs Peter Dixon Young. 




Rebecco Cage, daughter of Mr and Mrs Chuck 
Cage of Hollandole. 




Leslie Penni. and B.lty Hall Jr grands of the 
lestpf Halls r *- i- _« *. i 

IContinued on next page] 



W''¥'¥-¥^¥¥¥¥¥'¥'^¥¥¥¥¥^-¥'¥-48¥'¥^¥^¥^^^¥¥'¥'¥¥¥¥¥¥-^* 



CUTEST KIDS Continued 





Doug Hester, son of the Tim Hesters and grandson 
of the Edward Hesters 



Patricio Powers, daughter of the Jimmy Powells of 
Benoit and grand of Mrs. B.J. Powell of Gulf 
Breeze, Florida. 




Whitney Clair Nick, daughter of the Stephen 
N.cks 




Joseph Watts Yates. IV (Jo Jo), son of Attorney 
and Mrs. J.W. Yates, III. grand of the J.W. Yates. 
Jr. 




a 



Allison Avntt belongs to the Lairy Avntts Shav, 





Ross & Kevin Ward Grandchildren of Mr. & Mrs. 
Joe Ross 



The ftople'5 Choice bo^p 



UW\PHR€YS COUtMTY 

Board of supervisors 



\nuUe ujoa to HUlVlPHREYS COIIW 
for sowe FUN a.M> GOOD CKTFlSH 




v^ 



■p- 



rri 



r7~ 



A PHIL I V. 




[Continued on next page] 






LATNECENTRM COMPANY 

we ivjsfau o^i ^^N]f^ S I I\JCP (882 WATe \\ WFU DRuuo/e- 



HYORQL06lCFiL f/SICINEERtt^ 
XKiV£sri<JftTIONS 



Rea(/(^toSeru^Youi v/'ith 50 Oftic^sThYouql^ouiihe. Uhlfed States 



— (is "theve av\A wecah 



Ground water resources in the Yazoo Basin, commonly called the Delta, in northwestern Mississippi is one of 
the areas most precious resources. Bordered on the west by the ^■■:^';issippi River and on the east by on abrupt 
loess-covered escarpment, the Delta is a 7,000-square mile lens-shaped lowland of rich farmland that forms a part 
of the greater Mississippi alluvial plain. The climate of the area is subtropical and humid, the normal annual 
rainfall being about 50 inches and the mean annual temperature being 64.7° F. 

Alluvium in the Delta, consisting of clay, silt, sand, and gravel, ranges in thickness from a few feet to 200 
feet and averages 140 feet. It underlines the entire lowland, creating the most prolific aquifer in the area. A large 
but not unlimited supply of water is available from the alluvium except in a few places. 

Every locality in the region is underlain by at least one aquifer and in most localities there ore several fresh- 
water artesian aquifers at depths ranging from shallow to more than 2,000 feet. Westward dipping aquifers and 
a westward sloping land surface combine to give large areas of artesian flow. Water levels in the artesian aquifers 
have declined enough during the past 25 years to cause cessation of flow in many localities. Artesian pressures 
are still high in much of the eastern part of the Delta. 



Vice-iP/es'idei\t 
Highway t)l S 

ClevelanajVi,ss3^52 




f)lf}f^^^>^^^^^}f}f^^^^^^^^}f}f^lf}fif^^^^}f^^^^^^^ 



CUTEST KIDS Continued 






Mick Tosch. son of the Bobby Tosches and grand 
of the R.M. Wards. 



Pat Walton Denton. Jr., son of Mr. S Mrs. Pot 
Denton. Grandson of the Jack Dentons, all of 
Shelby. 



Duff Green Holcomb IV. son of Mr. and Mrs, Duff 
Green Holcomb III. Grand of Mrs. M.H. McDowell. 



lEiifriioira 




.".■ -■•^'.ZfSl^i^V-^' 



THeR.v.^Mvs.Glchn?y<| 



a M^aujL '^Jixpmment!' UL LU7?^yj£aAy 





T\ v.; TD \\T\ Die "ev.!tM)rs.H.fi. Wallace 

IheUev.^ lVirs.,.11uSS€n !VU.«ark (Continued on next page] 



CUTEST KIDS Continued 




Dovid West, son of the Johnny Wests & grandson 
of Ben Congers and Clayton Wests. 




Lone Eostlond. daughter of the Woods Eostlonds 
of Indionola. 



H.K. H/\^PO\.H,chairvnan o? the \>Q^rd 
WUD 8UCKlt?,JR.^vK«-chairn\ay\«jft^«bo<xr£j 

RONNIE VAUGHKl,py€sU«5«t 

MRS.L0lllSt"6.VAUGHN,v,ce-pres^assUtcnrstcj 
VnIUUKWI E.O'HBRE.attorneu 



.^^ 



^o 










MEMBER 



FSLTC 

FvdtralSivmgi&Loin InsumtCorp 



YcNjr Saving! fnuirad to MO.OOO 



^ 



Betsy Barry Winn (Mrs E H. Winn) age 12 
side saddle on her pony 



[Continued on next page) 



l¥¥¥¥¥¥>¥^¥¥¥¥¥¥¥¥¥¥¥¥'52¥¥¥¥¥¥>V'¥¥¥¥^¥^¥¥¥¥¥ 



ItM CHILDREN , LEFT MftNE. PERISH, IN RREtqp.fied stones 

dotting the news pflpers. Ruth brent did som€tt\"m9 obout it. 

TWentvj-Fivc v^fiarj ac^a she. p\\xY\<\t^ \r\io "th-e CTecvtloVi of o^ Greenville. 
M«\<^ViboYV>oo<J Center proVidmcj ciall4 caret© cK'il<lreh of a^^^K^■^1^ parents- 
She substfi^uev^t (4 5tt€r«<i t In-e. C«\^ter nr\to <\ pervnctJi^ht estab lisHjrrjf Ht 
Supported bi^ Feiero^l.State^avNcI local fands. 

To-dav^ tWe B/^rft 5ovxt\ns\de. Cey>t<r hosts an ai/^ra<ye of 120 

children a dau Avi<i has 19> f u\\ time emploc^«€s. iv/irs.Brcvit, a. 

Vcjiunteer alHhe a;<K<{^ passed up c^ 
lif^ of leisure for a ph'vlantWopic 
Veritare th<xt has irc^ire<J her 
fall attention for tu^o and 
o(ae-half decades. 

because She has v)i«\<{eSo 
irwantf lives So ify\ucli better 
LUe plAce (X st<\r *«\ the. Crov^^n 
■ihal ^undre^s of cerate fu.1 
pareviis a^%<l ch\l<lren thivik 
l?uiVi Brent shou.U su.rtlij wwr, 




^^lf^^^^^}f^^^^^^^}f^^^^^^^^^}f^^^^^^^^^lf^X 



CUTEST KIDS Continued 



l» 




John Mason Denton, III, son of the J.M. Dentons of 
Clark sdale. Grandson of the Jock Dentons of 
Shelby. 





Barbara Shackleford, daughter of the Edward 
Shoscklefords of Hollandole. 



Lee Margaret McLourJn. doughter of the Joe 
McLourins of Hollandole. 




Cc(?v/fUA (^D 



lOooKJ U\oy>jS 






SIGHT a^yvcb 





[Continued on next page] 



CUTEST KIDS Continued 






Marian Valliant McBride. daughter of the Nick 
Reynolds, grand of the Joe Eddins and great- 
grand of The Walter Lee Sheltons. 



Lee Lewand, son of the R.L. Lewands & grandson 
of Mrs. Leo Gerdes. 



Keith Dil worth, son of the Lyie Di I worths ond 
grand of the H.B. Hoods. 



Dependable produces from dependable people. 




RICELANO FOODS 

@>1 P. 0. BOX 927 ■ STUTTGART, ARKANSAS 721 BO 



[Continued on next page] 



k^^^^^^^^'V'^^^^^^^^^ss^^^^^^^^^^^^^^'^'^MM^^ 



COMPLIMENTS OF: 



ODmnnonujeQlth 

flQt^ionQl 

Life. ln6uroncG Compony 



<l^^-'9. Mr'xi 







HOME OFFICE — HIGHWAY 61 SOUTH — CLEVELAND. MISSISSIPPI 



:UTEST KIDS Continued 





Jav Clifton, son of the Homer Cliftons. 



Willie Earl Clark. Shaw. 





Jim Erwin. son of the Jimmy Erwins of Boyle. Ms. 



Celeste Willis, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Rusty 
Willis of Hollondole. 



I 



\ 



\\ 








Richard. Lisa S Michael Mills, oges 7, 5 S 2. grands 
oi the H.G. Mills. Benoit. 




Michael. 5. ond Leigh Carol. 9. children of Mrs. 
Betty Goodell. Greenville. 




\ 




/ 




Power Association 

WelltHlT-yifyoarllues 

Service in 13 Counties 



WINONA 



GREENWOOD INDIANOLA CLEVELAND 

[Continued on next page] 



CUTEST KIDS Continued 







Mark, 6, and Scott, 3. sons of the Bunny Newtons 
of England and gronds of tfie Jimmy Newtons. 




Ruth King Nabors, Leah Hoiley Nabors. Geoffrey 
Burris Nabors, Elizobeth King Burris and Margaret 
Anne Burris, the grands of Mr. & Mrs. James O. 
Burris, Jr., Clarksdale. 



slU 




Kirk Salterfield, son ot the Trovis Solterfcelds. 




[Continued on next page] 




Q Commercial National Bank 

^^ Greenville/ Leiand, Mississippi Member FDlC 

Branch of First National Bonk of Jacl<son, Mississippi 



CUTEST KIDS Continued 




Lauren. Amanda 8 Mollie, the daughters of the 
John A. Letchworths of Shelby and the gronds of 
the M.P. Letchworths. Shelby 



Allen Richard Votes, Jr.. son of Dr, & Mrs. Allen R. 
Yates, Jackson; grond of the J.W. Yates, Jr . 
Shelby 



Christopher & Stephen, sons of the Jimmy 
Mathews of Jockson and grands of the Hamp 
Mathews. Greenville 



E^E3 



BRANCH OF GUARANTY BANK ft TRUST CO, BELZONI. MISS 

HOLLANDALE, MISSISSIPPI 38748 
P. O. Box 306 



BOBBY STEINRIEDE 
PRESI DENT 



Uitidher its a big sack or a little one, 
LUe ojcmt Ljoato banH and giue uullh us, 
UJe'll make yourifnoney lu^rk Chardjfor uoa. 



mm 




[Continued on next page] 



Jf>lf}f^^}f^^i^}f^^^^^^^^^^^>f>^^^^^}f^^^^^^^^^^\ 



lUTEST KIDS Continued 






Jimmie and Bob, the children of Mr. and Mrs. 
Leslie Walker, with their mother. Gronds of Mrs. 
Robert James, Shelby. 



Mott McCollum, son of the Johnny McCollums of 
Hollondale. 



Jason and Jennifer Barnard ond Kim Wochter. 




FICE OF THE MAYOR 



Wm. C. BURNLEY. JR. 



MAYOR 



Comp\\mer\U of the Gt/ of 6yeenv\\\e 






jrRRY LA^kAE, Cou we'll W» an 
BOVS) V»<^ 6«UGH,Councj\»wark 



WVRS,8eTTY ELUS.counalwoman 

ROQERT hAftY,Cc7UWc!lman 
PEYTON XR6Y,couwc*i\rina»a 



?OKT CITYoftiuDELTA 



[Continued on next page] 



CUTEST KIDS Continued 



1 




*^ ^m 



r«^ 



Norman McLeod Orr, son of the Wayne Orrs of 
Clarksdale and grand of the Normon Henrys of 
Clevelond. 




Alan and Lou Ann. the children ot the Kennetn 
Hoods. 



iW?? 




m^ 



%.. ^ 



Porker and Hiram, the sons of the H.L, Dilworths; 
grands of the Mox Dilworlhs. 



Tte id-atio 
Has Got To Go 

and il v(7iH^ 




Meitvker Smce 195^ - Box 69 - Clevelanci,Ms.38752 
JOHKl B-DELAHoassAYE-exectdive vice-pres 

w.A.w£LSHi^Ns,JR-5ecy■etary.tTeasarelr 

TRWis p/\RKER-\/ice -president 
EDWARD A. LYows- first vite-presiJent 
KMHETH FRCY- second VI ce* president 
BRaOY COLE - thiri vice-president 



J 



IContinued on next page] 



CUTEST KIDS Continued 




'1 



V 



'^ 



Jenny Beth Dreher, daughter of the Roy D. 
Drehers and grand of the Roy Drehers, all of 
Elenoit. 




Michael McCloin Causey, son of Dr, & Mrs. W.M. 
Causey. Ole Miss professors- Grand of Mrs 
George Causey, Shelby 





John Cope, son of the John Copes of Hollandole 



IContinued on next page] 



CUTEST KIDS Continued 






Woyne Farmer, son of the Delbert Farmers. 



Mary Amanda Weilenmon, daughter of Mr. & Mrs. 
John W. Weilenmon, Jr. 



Cory Rodicioni. son of Mr. and Mrs. Louis 
Rodictoni and grond of the Chester Wotsons, 
Shelby. 



GREENVILLE 



PRODUCTION CREDIT ASSOCIATION 



"Owned by Those We Serve" 



DEPENDABLE SOURCE OF CREDIT FOR DELTA AGRICULTURE 



Central Office: 

250 South Shelby Street 
P O Box 876 

Greenville, Mississippi 38701 
Telephone 378-2fjOO 



Branch Offices: 

Cleveland, Mississippi 
Rolling Fork, Mississippi 
Hollandale, Mississippi 



[Continued on next page] 



CUTEST KIDS Continued 





Su^. ^^4^^,i 



Tom & Gin who belong to the Jimmy HoHings- 
worths of Hollondole. 



Jim Powell, Robert Powell and Patricio Powell 
belong to the Jimmie Powells of Benoit and are 
the grands of Mrs. B.J. Powell of Gulf Breeze, 
Florida 




Meg Bradley and Amy Kathryn McGee belong to 
the Leo G McGees of Shelby, the gronds of the 
S.R. Pitts. Cleveland. S the Leo H. McGees, 
Gunnison. 



MIM 





^/icb.cnaAd's 



FROf^l: Fnendln Ftxrw Cre<iit 
1000 StoheViavtStr«et 
l//aslriirioto»i,D,C. 

3 hour OTQce 
TO '" forec losoDtgTlept, 



RE- OLD M^DONftLB'S FARM 

To^ OMnYDonddmtof Jj 

M£/it of c/ia.^^ oy/id/aJ^ PAID OQX 




[Continued on next page] I 



CUTEST KIDS Continued 




Susan 5, and Wade, 17 months, children of the 

Bart Smiths, Louise, Mississippi. 




Sarah Kelly Young, daughter of the James 
Fornsworth Youngs of Dallas, grand of Mrs. Poul 
Evons Sexton ond Mrs. Peter Young. 




Dolton Alley, son of the F.D. Alleys & grandson of 
the C.C, Jacobs & Warwick Smiths. 




/ 



RVT\«ttv\eNT HOWllT 



3ST40 




INTERMEDIATE CARE FKCUITY 

^ 5i Beds * IVi^dicaio Appro/ed 
CHftRLES E. SmiTH • admwi^strcxtor 

HA^S.EYA ANN BOS CH eRT- ass.stcht odmimstraCorSsoaa/ ^^re^^or 



[Continued on next page] 



CUTEST KIDS Continued 



i r* 


X 

s. 


hi 


&s^ 


Cy 1 1 II /^ 


)HEs 





Mira, Denise and Amy. children of the John 
Dentons. Grands of the Dave Dentons, all of 
Shelby. 



Alon Joseph Mills, 3, grandson of the H.G. Mills, 
Benoit. 



Amanda Nunnery, doughter of the Bob Nunnerys 
of Hollandole. 



Energy Savers 




Easy-on-Energy 
Heat Pump 

Single system that both heats and 
cools. Delivers two units of heat for 
each unit of electricity it uses. Save 
energy and money 




Ml DOLE SOUTH 
UTILITIES SYSTEM 





Energy Efficient 
Electric Home 

Records prove savings of 60% or more 
on heating and cooling costs. 



Save Energy and Money 

Add insulation, install storm windovw 
and doors, caulk, weather strip. 



Energy Information Center 

If it involves the use of energy in your home, business or 
plant, call MP&L for literature and answers to your 
questions. 

/Mississippi power & light 

He/ping Build Mississippi 



[Continued on next page] 



CUTEST KIDS Continued 




Joson Marshall Waller and Phillip Brandon Waller, 
sons of Dr. and Mrs. Richard E. Waller- 




Donna, Danny & Clay Mills, grands of the H.G. 
Mills. Benoit. 




Robert Hayes, oge 9. grandson o( the Chorles 
Venutis. Show 



VICKERSTOWmG CO. inc. 

Uke Ferguson^ Box \\35 

n ^ ,'lUVi^ PHONE 331- (i.lS7 

ijuants u\sitors to meet some 




' - ' but" row rocQus 70 v-^fl«_^^R^WAr5-_ 









[Continued on next page! 



JTEST KIDS Continued 






Ryan i Matthew Short, children of the Dennis 
Shorts and gronds of the Marlow Montesis, Shaw. 



Jennifer Mitchell, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Ned 
Mitchell. 



Ryan MiKer. son of the Anky Millers. Grandson of 
the Adiia Morgans, oil of Jackson. 



A couple of words to travelers 
in Mississippi who don t bother 
calling ahead for reservations: 



Be smart. Phone ahead. 



m 



au 



South Central Bell 



f>»-#. 



IContinued on next page] 



CUTEST KIDS Continued 






Chris Brunetti, son of the Alex Brunetris, grand of 
the Charlie Boy Williams. 



Hugh Com Smith, V, son of Dr. & Mrs. Hugh C. 
Smith 



Mary Hayes, granddaughter of the Charles 
Venutis. Shaw. 




irr^ ^^ ^ 



T\\e,Yix)eTehaa\\^q^\t toiJhea'in like tWis uo^ey^t\^G 

BKNK OF HOlUUmit 

MEiviBER fDic Opened up m HOT. 

COME B\ lV\e 81^M\^ a? HCLLPiMDRLi 

Wov/,oistt€\|U)erethen, our easterners are oar specialties 



# # « 



.}fJf^^^^}f^^}f^^^^^^^}f^y,.}f^^}f^^^^^^Jf^if^^^^^X 



Of I week-ends t/iey'r^ crouuded, but the. 
delta h(^s SI m E P/]RKS.^'^^^^^'^'^'^^^'^- 



1] LEROY PERCY STATE PARK, six miles 
west of Hollandale off Ms. Hwy. 12. Has 
everything state parks can have except minia- 
ture golf, equipment check out, water skiing, 
boat launching, tennis, sailboats and Kayaks. It 
has camping, cabins, group camping, restau- 
rant, pool, refreshment stand, lodge, picnic 
area, bikes, alligators in captivity, fishing, 
fishing boats, etc. But be wary. The public with 
a capital "P" is there every weekend. Park is 
built in a low place and gets muddy in bad 
weather. There's Spanish moss in the trees. 
Bird watchers' paradise. 

The Mid-Delta 



2] GREAT RIVER ROAD PARK off Hwy 1 on 

south edge of Rosedale. Offers primitive 
camping, nice looking playground for children, 
large open air pavilion, picnic tables (some in 
shade, most in sun). The hardy souls can walk 
the short distance through the thin line of trees 
to a real sandbar in the Mississippi River. 
Probably your best bet, in fact, to get on a 
sandbar. Climb the lookout tower (plenty 
strong looking) and take pictures and get a 
really great view of the Mississippi, the Father 
of Waters. On weekends it is crowded. If it's a 
river view you're after, this will be your easiest. 
The trees on each side of approach deserve 
notice. 



Campsite construction set 

ROSEDALE— Construction is scheduled to begin next week on 60 
campsites at the Great River Road State Park here. 

The sites are expected to be completed in time for the 1979 fall 
camping season, according to Frank Alley, director of planning for 
the state park commission. 

Roy Collins Builders & Contractors of Cleveland has been awarded 
the contract for construction of the sites. Alley said. 

The park official said the campground will be financed with a 
$205,250 grant with a federal agency putting up 50 percent matching 
funds. 

The grant was announced Monday by Congressman David 
Bo won 's office. 

Roy Collins Jr. said sewer, water and electric lines will be 
installed in the area and then blacktop roads built. 

"It will be complete campsite," he said. "Although it is not in our 
contract, picnic tables and eating areas will be built later." 



3] THE WINTERVILLE MOUNDS PARK on 

Hwy. 61 SIX miles north of Greenville has a 
picnic area (small charge) and a museum of 
Indian artifacts. This is a well managed park but 
a weekend visit might be frustrating because 
clubs, schools, etc. come in droves on the 
weekend. No refreshment stand. Playground 
equipment there, but it is usually filled. 
However, on the west side of the Delta this is 
your best opportunity to see Indian artifacts. 

4] FLOREWOOD, two miles west of Green- 
wood off U.S. 82. This is the grandest of all the 
state parks in the Delta. A living plantation, it 
has the big mansion home, the outbuildings and 
.the general layout of a real plantation, the 
difference being that a real one was never so 
clean or so well run as this one. This is a must 
for everyone traveling on the east side of the 
Delta. 





lT5TmeF0RAl£SSON (M 

miSIOHC SlliS latneDEUft 



they're all ooer the place 



Academic historical sites in the Delta are 
divided into four categories. Academic in this 
instance means the site is recorded and verified 
by the Mississippi Department of Archives and 
History. THe four categories are: 1) The State 
Markers; 2) National Register Sites and Build- 
ings; 3) National Historic Landmarks; and 4) 
Prehistoric National Register and National 
Historic Landmark Sites.* 

[1] The SUte Markers. In 1948 the State of 
Mississippi began a program of Installing 
permanent markers (about 3x2 ft. metal with 
green background topped by the magnolia, the 
state flower) at points of historical interest. 
These markers designate historically interest- 
ing sites but the marker does not necessarily 
signify National Register, National Landmark or 
prehistoric. Sad to say, many of the 
"permanent" markers are gone, the victims of 
vandals or errant vehicles. The existing ones 
tell short, interesting, and TRUE stories. 




/i£ 



Preservotionists 

[2] The National Register of Historic Places 

To be listed on the Register a site, building or 
place must be recommended by the State 
Historic Preservation officer who, in the state of 
Mississippi, is Mr. Elbert Hilllard, director of 
the Mississippi State Department of Archives 
and History. The advantage of being on the 
Register is that the property, having been 
certified through research by competent histor- 
ians as being of historical significance, becomes 
eligible for Federal grants for historic preserva- 
tion. Also, the private sector often elects to use 
the Register listing as its criteria for making 
grants. No other arm of the government can 
finance the demolition of a National Register 
property. The National Historic Preservation 
Act of 1966, a belated but real rescue effort by 
the nation to save historic properties, set up 
the register. Being on the Register does not 
assure a property of getting money, it lust 
means they can get their name in the pot 
[3] To be a National Historic Landmark the 



building or site must have national historical 
importance. The Landmark designation has 
been bestowed only twice in the Delta. 

[4] The Pre-historic National Register sites. 
Archaelogical surveys have verified 14 sites 
with evidence of pre-historic life. In most 
instances the sites are on private property. In 
all instances it is against the laws of the state of 
Mississippi for anyone to dig or trespass on any 
Indian mound in the state. 




Robert Boiley of Archieves Deportment 

A 1] State Markers in Bolivar County— Loca- 
tion and significance of site. 

1) GEORGE WASHINGTON ELM, Highway 1, 
east side, south outskirts of Rosedale, Hwy 8 
junction. Descendant of "Tree of Liberty" 
under which Washignton took command of 
Continental Army at Cambridge, Mass , 1775. 
Awarded to Miss. Delta Chapter, DAR, for its 
conservation activities, 1948. 

2) GUNNISON, Highway 1, east side, south 
outskirts of Gunnison. Founded 1889 on 
plantation of Arvin Nye Gunnison (1824-1882). 
Gunnison made cotton gins in New Orleans 
prior to Civil War. During the war he and 
Samuel Griswold of Georgia produced revolvers 
for C.S.A 

3) ROSEDALE COURTHOUSE, Rosedale, 
Hwy 1. The county's second brick courthouse 
stood here, 1889 to 1923 when foundation gave 
way to flood seep water. First brick courthouse 
at Prentiss was destroyed in 1863 by Federals 
and later was covered by Mississippi river. 

4) OLD PRENTISS, b'/i miles Vest of 
Highway 1 South of Beulah Early Choctaw 
settlement on Mississippi River, named for 
Sargeant Prentiss (a famous orator), seat of the 
county from 1852 until it was burned by 
Federals m 1863. Entombed by flood in 1865 
and unearthed by drought in 1954 

5) MOUND BAYOU, US 61, east side of 
highway in front of hospital Largest US Negro 
town; settled July 12, 1887 by ex slaves of Joe 

.72, 



Davis, who conceived idea before Civil War. 
Founders were Isaiah T. Montgomery (member 
of the 1890 state convention) and his cousin, 
Benjamin T. Green. 

6) DUNCAN, Highway 61, between Clarks- 
dale and Shelby. First settled in early 1850's by 
Col. James Brown. Named for an early settler, 
Robert Duncan, and incorporated in 1890. 
Andrew Jackson Donelson, nephew of Pres. 
Andrew Jackson, owned a plantation near 
here. 

7) DORO PLANTATION, west side of Highway 
1, a mile south of Beulah. Received as a fee in a 
famous Indian lawsuit in the 1940's by Charles 
Clark, later a Civil War governor, 1863-65. He. 
and some of his descendants are buried on an 
Indian mound on grounds of this plantation. 
Privately owned. 




"fc■^^v<{.Aii'V'^^ 



.* 



liirjj. '^^i'::t\^T-^4:K:^ 



The Jocobs-Clork Cemetery near Beulah on old Doro 
Plantotion. General Chorles Clark's grave is lollest 
monument on the old Indian mound. Privote 

8) DELTA STATE COLLEGE, Highway 8 West 
of Cleveland. Established as Delta State 
Teachers College by act of Legislature in 1924, 
Site donated by Bolivar County Officially 
opened September 15, 1925. In 1955 name 
changed to Delta State College. In 1975, to 
Delta State University. 

9) CONCORDIA CEMETERY, Highway 1, two 
miles North of Gunnison. Oldest cemetery in 
the county Used by Concordia settlers as early 
as 1848 Concordia Methodist Church, first 
church in this area, built on this site. 

10) CHOCTAW LINE At intersection of 446 & 
1, north of Benoit and on U.S. 61 four miles 
south of Shaw Boundary between Choctaw 
cessions of 1820 (Doaks Stand) and 1830 
(Dancing Rabbit Creek), going from Southeast 
corner Simpson County northward into Holmes 
and thence through Bolivar County, (several 
markers designate the Choctaw Line) 

11) FIRST BOLIVARCOUNTY COURTHOUSE 
intersection of Highway 1 and Bolivar Road. 

IContinued on next pagel 



HISTORIC SITES Continued 

South of Benoit. William Vick's house on Old 
Lake Bolivar, site of first meeting of the Bolivar 
County Board of Police, May 30, 1836, was 
used as first courthouse. The house site, two 
miles northwest of marker, caved into the 
Mississippi River. 

A 2] State Markers in Washington County- 
Location and signicance of site. 

12) WINTERVILLE MOUNDS, Highway 1 at 
Winterville State Park and Museum five miles 
North of Greenville. Ceremonial Indian mounds 
built around 1000 A.D. They comprise one of 
the largest mound groups in Mississippi Valley. 
Great Central mound is 55 feet in height. Ms. 
Park Comm., owner. 

13) MISSISSIPPI, THE MAGNOLIA STATE, 
U.S. Hwy. 82, Entrance to Greenville-Lake 
Village Bridge over Mississippi River. Explored 
1540-1541 by DeSoto. Colonized first by 
French in 1699. Became a colony of British in 
1763; the Spanish in 1779; territory organized 
by U.S. in 1798. Became 20th state in 1817. 



18) BELMONT PLANTATION, Highway 1 
South of Greenville. One of few ante-bellum 
houses remaining in the Mississippi Delta; built 
in 1857 for W.W. Worthington. Plundered by 
Federal troops in 1863. Belmont Hunting Lodge 
founded in Jackson and mansion is still today a 
hunting club. 




Famous lunch box used by The Hon. Cliff Finch during 
gubernatorial campaign. 

14) HAMPTON PLANTATION, intersection of 
Vliss. Hwy. 1 and 436 at Hampton, south of 
Sreenville. Purchased in 1840's by Hampton 
■amily. In fifties, sixties, & seventies operated 
Dy and at intervals was residence of Wade 
Hampton III, distinguished CSA General and 
tirst governor of S.C. after reconstruction. 

15) DEER CREEK. The source of the Creek, 
'lowing from Lake Bolivar, is seen at the bridge 
at Scott on Highway 1. It flows SE through 
Bolivar & almost all of Washington Cunty. The 
soils along this lengthy and lively tributary of 
:he Yazoo River are among the most fertile in 
:he world. An agriculturally based, prehistoric 
ndian culture thrived along the creek as early 
as 1200 AD. 

16) ST. JOHN'S CHURCH, on blacktop road 
:ircling Lake Washington, 3.5 miles southwest 
)f Glen Allan. First Episcopal church in Delta, 
jite donated by Jonathan McCaleb, 1844. 
Constructed, 1852-1856. Window lead was 
jsed during Civil War for bullets. Structure 
vrecked by tornado in 1904. Ruins still there in 
old cemetery. 

17) GREENVILLE, on Lake Ferguson across 
[he Mississippi River from Lake Village, Ark. 
'ort City of the Delta; named for Gen. 
■Jathanael Greene. Washington County seat 
iince 1846. Destroyed in Civil War. Rebuilt on 
present site, 1865. Home of W.A. Percy and H. 
Carter, pub. 




Mr. and Mrs. William Winter at historic preservation 
meeting 

A 3] State Markers in Sunflower County— Lo- 
cation and significance of site. 

19) "WHERE THE SOUTHERN CROSSES 
THE DOG", Morehead near the crossing of the 
Illinois Central and the Columbus and Green- 
ville Railroads. This intersection of the South- 
ern Railroad (now the C&G) and the Yazoo 
Mississippi Valley (now the Illinois Central) 
inspired countless folksongs, stories and paint- 
ings. Crossing dates from 1895. 

20) CHOCTAW LINE at Hwy. 49 North and 
Miss. 3 intersection north of Inverness. Bound- 
ary between Choctaw cessions of 1820 (Doak's 
Stand) and 1830 (Dancing Rabbit Creek) going 
from Southeast corner Simpson County north- 
ward into Holmes and thence through Bolivar 
County. 

21) CHOCTAW LINE on South side U.S. Hwy. 
82 two miles west of Indianola. (Significance 
same as above Number 20). 

A 4] State Marker in Simpson County [not in 
Delta]— Location and significance of site. 

22) CHOCTAW LINE, Mississippi Highway 20 
near Magee, (Significance same as above 
Number 20). 

A 5] State Marker in Sharkey County— Loca- 
tion and significance of site. 

23) HILL'S PLANTATION, North side Miss. 
Highway 1, seven-tenths mile west of intersec- 
tion of 1 & 61 at Onward. U.S. Admiral Porter's 
gunboats reached this juncture of Black Bayou 
and Deer Creek March 16, 1863 in Steele's 
Bayou Expedition. Sherman camped here, then 
moved north to protect boats from C.S. Army. 

A 6] State Marker In Issaquena County— Lo- 
cation and significance of site. 

24) MAYERSVILLE, MISSISSIPPI, due west of 
Rolling Fork on the river. Issaquena County, 
created 1844, established its seat of govern- 
ment at Mayersville in 1872. David Mayer 
donated this historic Mississippi River port site 
to the county for the founding of the town in 
1871. 

A 7] State Markers in Leflore County— Loca- 
tion and significance of site. 

25) SIDON on U.S. 49 East at Sidon, 
Mississippi. Formerly Marion and the earliest 
boat landing in area. Later named for the Dr. 
WW. Durden plantation, one time home of 



.73. 



James K. Vardaman. editor, soldier, governor 
and United States senator. 

26) POINT LEFLORE, the courthouse lawn. 
Greenwood on U.S. 82. Northeast two miles at 
junction of Tallahatchie & Yalobusha Rivers is 
site of extinct town founded in 1830's by 
Greenwood Leflore. Achieved great prosperity 
in year before the Civil War. 

27) FORT PEMBERTON on U.S. 82 the west 
side of Greenwood. Here is site of fort at which 
Grant's gunboats, bound for Vicksburg early in 
1863, were halted by fort batteries and by the 
sunken hulk of the "Star of the West" in 
channel, Tallahatchie River. 

28) OLD GREENWOOD CEMETERY in the 
town of Greenwood. Burial spot of four wars. 
Among 40 Confederates there is grave of Lt. 
Azro A. Stoddard, who carried out orders to 
scuttle the "Star of the West", thus preventing 
federal use of Yazoo River route to Vicksburg. 

29) McNUTT, near Schlater, Mississippi. 
North '/2 mile on lake said to have received its 
name from Governor Alexander G. McNutt. 
Was the county seat of Sunflower County, 
1850-71, becoming part of Leflore County in 
1871. 

30) ITTA BENA ("Home in the Woods"), at 
Itta Bena, Mississippi on Hwy. 7. Plantation 
home site (from which town was named) of Brig. 
Gen. Ben|. G. Humphreys, CSA. Elected 
governor of Mississippi October 1865. Forcibly 
removed by Carpetbag regime in June, 1868. 

31) GREENWOOD, Courthouse lawn, Green- 
wood, Mississippi. Founded by John Williams as 
Williams Landing, 1834. Chartered as Green- 
wood, 1844; since 1917 has been the world's 
largest long staple cotton market. 

32) FIRST UNITED METHODIST CHURCH, 
Greenwood, Mississippi. Built in 1898-99 in 
spite of yellow fever quarantine which hamper- 
ed construction. J.H. Mitchell was its first 
pastor. Fifteen hundred people attended the 
1899 North Mississippi Conference to hear 
Bishop Warren Candler speak. 

A 8] State Markers in Coahoma County— lo- 
cation and significance of site. 

33) YAZOO PASS, thirteen miles north of 
Clarksdale, east side of Highway. Here in 
February 1863, United States forces dynamited 
levee to enable flotilla to get through to Fort 
Pemberton at Greenwood. The effort to use the 
Yazoo River to reach Vicksburg via Fort 
Pemberton was futile. 

34) ANDREW JACKSON PLANTATION, Hwy. 
1 at Sherard, Mississippi. Here from 1839 to 
1849 the President owned a plantation of some 
1100 acres, lodayall of this property is covered 
by the Mississippi River. 

35) INDIAN MOUNDS, at junction of U.S. 61 
and old U.S. 61 three miles South of Lula. Built 
c. 700 AD. on Mississippi river banks. Surface 
pottery indicates extended occupation. Here 
ceremonial temples were built and in plaza 
between mounds rites were held. 

36) FORREST'S PLANTATION, Highway 1 at 
Green Groves. Owned by Gen. N.B. Forrest, 
1858-1866. On this 1900 acre plantation the 
General for a time maintained homes for 
Confederate veterans. 

37) DELTA, Highway 1. Inside levee is site 
Coahoma's first county seat, settled about 
1843. Town was abandoned during 1870's 

[Continued on next page] 



HISTORIC SITES Continued 

because of change in course of Mississippi 
River. 




Ed Hollingsworlh, Elbert Milliard, Ron Miller, Fred Wagner, 
and T,J. Foster 

38) CLARKSDALE, Clarksdale, Miss, at 
intersection of U.S. 61 and U.S. 49. Site where 
Indian trails crossed. Founded In 1868 by John 
Clark who bought land In 1840. Chartered In 
1882. Coahoma co-county seat in 1892; sole 
one since 1930, Home of Gov, Earl Brewer. 

39) CHICKASAW-CHOCTAW LINE, Tunica- 
Coahoma line, U.S. 61. Fixed In 1786 by 
Chickasaw Chief Plomlngo In Treaty of Hope- 
well. Last of area to south ceded by Choctaws In 
1830. Area to north opened to whites by 
Pontotoc Treaty with Chlckasaws in 1832. 

40) CHARLEY'S TRACE, Dublin, Mississippi 
on Hwy, 6, Old trail leading to the Mississippi 
River, Dating from the 18th century. It was 
named after a Choctaw Indian who lived on it 
and Is reputed to have served as a guide, 

41) JAMES L, ALCORN (1816-1894), U.S. 61 
on Eagle's Nest Road. General, U.S. Senator, 
and State Governor. Founder of the state levee 
system which opened the Delta for cultivation. 
His plantation home, "Eagle's Nest" is three 
miles east. 

A 9] State Markers in Tallahatchie County- 
Location and significance of site. 

42) TALLAHATCHIE COUNTY, at Hwy. 49 
east, Webb, Mississippi. Organized Dec. 23, 
1833 after Third Choctaw Cession. Name 
means "River of the Rock". Before Charleston, 
Tillotoba briefly served as county seat. Three 
adjacent counties contain part of original 
county. 

43) PAYNES, west side Hwy. 35, five miles 
south of Charleston. Community dates from 
1830's. Originally "Page's on Sculmore": the 
"Dogwood Flats". In 1870's took name of Payne 
family. Dr. George W. Payne was early resident. 
His son, George H. Payne, was prominent 
planter of area. (See Home Insurance ad. The 
Cossars are Payne descendants.) 

44) LOCAPOLIS, Hwy. 32, west of Charles- 
ton. Ten miles west on east bank of Tallahatc- 
hie. First port in county. At times in 1830's with 
40 boats In port, It rivaled Memphis. Here In 
Civil War the Union forces sank several C.S.A. 
boats. 

45) CHARLESTON, east side of Hwy. 32 at 
Charleston. Named for South Carolina city, 
from which many of earliest residents came. 
Old Tillatoba, original settlement, was aban- 
doned In 1837 when present site became 
county seat. 



46) CASCILLA, Leverett-Grenada Road, 
Cascilla, Mississippi. Early town site in Tallaha- 
tchie County, formed 1833 after 1830 Choctaw 
Cession. Cascilla post office dates from before 
1870 Homes of State Attorney General Greek , 
L, Rice and Congressman Jamie Whitten, 

A 10] State Markers in Yazoo County— Loca- 
tion and significance of site, 

47) B,S, RICKS MEMORIAL LIBRARY, Yazoo 
City, Mississippi, Built in 1900 and given to the 
Yazoo Library Association by Mrs. Ricks In 
memory of her husband, this example of Beaux 
Arts Classicism continues to serve Yazoo City 
and County as a public library. 




At historic preservation meeting, 
Lutken 



Mr, and Mrs, Donald 



48) CONFEDERATE NAVY YARD, Yazoo City, 
U.S. 49 North. Here In 1862 Confederates set 
up Navy Yard where they built the Ironclad 
ram, the "Arkansas", which victoriously engag- 
ed four U.S. fleets on the Mississippi River and 
lifted the Vicksburg siege. 

49) CASEY JONES, Vaughan, Mississippi. A 
famous ballad, the folklore of American rail- 
roading, and a postage stamp commemorate 
the colorful and courageous engineer who was 
killed in a wreck here in 1900. 

50) BENTON, at Hwy. 16 approximately 
one-half block west of intersection of 16 and 
433. Was Yazoo County seat from 1829 until 
1850 Settled by William Y. Gadberry In 1828, 
first court being held in his log home. Chartered 
In 1836, Nearby Cedar Grove Plantation was 
home of Col. John Sharp and of famed Sen. 
John Sharp Williams. 

B 1] The National Register listings in Bolivar 
County: 

51) THE BURRUS HOUSE on 4 acre Holly- 
wood Plantation on Hwy. 448 near Benoit. 
Construction started In 1858 by John C. 
Burrus, one of first settlers in county. Bolivar 
County lands opened up the Treaty of Dancing 
Rabbit Creek in 1830. Although in a state of 
deterioration, the house Is the only extant 
"mansion type" structure remaining In county. 
Now owned by Bolivar County Historical Society 
and being restored by Friends of the iurrus 
House. 

52) The Donelson House, near Duncan. 
House was on plantation of Andrew Jackson 
Donelson (1799-1871), a prominent soldier, 
lawyer, politician, diplomat and nephew of 
President Andrew Jackson. Donelson, a native 
of Tennessee, was engaged In cotton produc- 
tion in the Delta In early 1840's. During 
Jackson's administration he was private secre- 



-74- 



tary to president and ran for vice-president In 
1856 on the Know-Nothing ticket headed by 
Millard Fillmore. Owned by Mrs. Joe Yates, 
Shelby, Mississippi, 

B 2] The National Register listings in 
Washington County: 

53) FIRST NATIONAL BANK OF GREEN- 
VILLE, Main & Walnut Streets, Greenville, Ms. 
The bank was the first federally chartered bank 
In Washington County and Is today one of the 
oldest federally chartered banks In continuous 
operation In the state. It Is built In the 
Neo-Classlcal style. Owned by First National 
Bank of Greenville. 

54) WETHERBEE HOUSE, 509 Washington 
Ave., Greenville, Ms. As the single residence 
remaining on Greenville's primary downtown 
thoroughfare, the Wetherbee House is a rare 
example of the modest cottage type of domestic 
architecture common to this town in the 
post-Civll-War decades. Owned by Greenville 
garden clubs. Open Monday afternoons. 

18) BELMONT for info see marker listing. 
Historic American Buildings Survey. Owned by 
.Belmont Lodge, Inc., Box 899, Jackson, 
Mississippi 

55) MOUNT HOLLY, between Lake Washing- 
ton & Hwy. 1. Built c. 1855 by Margaret 
Johnson Erwin Dudley, daughter of Henry 
Johnson, large landholder in Delta. Later 
owned by planters and politicians William 
Hezeklah Foote and Huger Lee Foote. One of 
few remaining mansion-type ante-bellum 
homes in Delta. Design attributed to Samuel 
Sloan, although similar to one of Calvert Vaux. 
One of two best Mississippi examples of Italian 
villa style (other being Ammadelle in Oxford). 
Privately owned. Trinity Methodist Church of 
Greenville owns Mount Holly. 

56) ERWIN HOUSE, on Lake Washington. 
Constructed c. 1830 by Junius R. Ward, it Is 
believed to be oldest extant structure in the 
county. A classic example of an early Mississippi 
plantation home. Privately owned. Mr. and Mrs. 
William J. Shutt are owner-residents. 

12) WINTERVILLE SITE (See Marker listing). 
Open to public. Museum, fifty cents; picnic 
area, 25c each; Represents Zenity of pre-histor- 
Ic developments In that part of Mississippi 
Valley. Contact between Plaquemine & Miss, 
cults. 

B 3] The National Register Listings in Leflore \ 
County. 

27) FORT PEMBERTON (See Marker listing) 
Owned by U.S. Corps of Engineers. 

57) STAR OF THE WEST, at Fort Pemberton 
In Leflore County, two miles west of Green- 
wood. Built in 1852, she was the recipient of 
the first shot fired In the American Civil War in 
Charleston Harbor on January 9, 1861. Captur- 
ed by Colonel Earl Van Dorn off the Texas coast, 
she was taken to New Orleans and renamed the 
CSS St. Phillip. The vessel was scuttled in the 
Tallahatchie River to successfully obstruct the 
federal fleet attempting to attack the Confede- 
rate Fort Pemberton. Owned by General 
Services Administration of Washington, D.C. 

58) THE BLACK SITE, near Greenwood 
Mississippi. A combination village and mound 
site, the Black Site could provide Information 
pertaining to both mound construction and the 
pattern of houses In relation to it. Private. 

B 4] The National Register listings in 
[Continued on next page] 



HISTORIC SITES Continued 

Coahoma County. Coahoma means "red 
panther". 
t 33) YAZOO PASS LEVEE, thirteen miles 
north of Clarksdale in Moon Lake vicinity. See 
Marker listing. Before levee construction bet- 
ween Moon Lake and the Mississippi River in 
1856, the Yazoo Pass was used to link the 
Mississippi, Coldwater, Tallahatchie, and Yazoo 
Rivers. Federal forces broke the levee at Moon 
Lake on January 30, 1863 as the initial phase of 
Grant's Yazoo Pass Expedition. Nine gunboats 
and 27 transports carrying five-thousand infan- 
try slowly pushed their way through to Fort 
Pemberton on April 5, 1863. Owned by 
Yazoo-Miss. Delta Levee Board. 

59) CARSON MOUNDS, Clarksdale vicinity, 
Mississippi. The significance of this site lies 
both in its historical value as one of the possible 
sites of the villages of Quiz-quiz, visited by 
DeSoto in 1541 and in its pre-historic context 
as a large Mississippi Period ceremonial 
complex, settlement and cemetery. Owned by 
John P. Pelegrin of Oasis Plantation near 

Clarksdale. 

60) RUFUS DAVIS SITE, Clarksdale vicinity, 

Mississippi. This site five miles northwest of 
Clarksdale consists of a large, well-preserved 
Mississippi Period platform mound. The site is 
archaeologically significant because it probably 
contains undisturbed structural remains and 
historically significant because of its possible 
connection with the 1541 DeSoto expedition 
through the present state of Mississippi. 

B 5] The National Register listings in 
Tallahatchie County. [No. 61 is not in Tallahat- 
chie County & not on Delta area map.] 

61) CIVIL WAR EARTHWORKS, Tallahatchie 
Crossing of the old Oxford-Holly Springs Road. 
Fortifications erected in December, 1862 by 
Maj. Gen. James B. McPherson for the purpose 
of controlling the vital crossing of the Tallahat- 
chie on the old Holly Springs-Oxford Road. 
McPherson evacuated the positions following 
Van Dorn's destructive cavalry attack on the 
Federal forces at Holly Springs. Later action at 
the site occurred in the fall of 1863 and on 
August 7, 1864. Owned by the U.S. Corps of 
Engineers, Vicksburg District. Part of the 
Sardis Reservoir property. 




All with historic propf-'.r-5 to ^ove 

62) SPIVEY SiTb at Crowder. Mississippi 
This site which has yielded surface material 
representative of 3 pre-histonc periods A good 
site for study of cultural change and of 
interaction among aboriginal peoples Protect- 
ed until recently from agricultural intrusion by 
swampy environment Unlike many others in 



the Yazoo Basin, the .site is in a relatively 
pristine condition Bore holes indicate a fairly 
undisturbed midden deposit of at least two 
feet. The lithic assemblage from the site offers 
data for study of pre-historic tool making and 
certain features suggest potential information 
concerning pre-historic architect, development 

B 6] The National Register listings in Yazoo 
County. Yazoo means "the death". 

49) CASEY JONES WRECK SITE at Vaughan 
vicinity in Yazoo County. Jones was an Illinois 
Central engineer. See marker listing. Owned by 
Illinois Central Gulf Railroad. 

47) B.S. RICKS MEMORIAL LIBRARY, Yazoo 
City, Mississippi. Building was designed by 
Alfred Zucker in the Beaux arts style. Edwar- 
dian proportion and classical ornament com- 
bine to give it pronounced monumentality. 
Open to the public. Owned by Yazoo Library 
Association. 

B 7] The National Register listing in Tunica 
County. Tunica means "the people". 

63) BEAVERDAM SITE, at Evansville near 
Tunica. The significance lies in its potential for 
future research within a phase framework, as: 
well as within its own intrasite cultural 
framework. The mound has much remaining 
undisturbed context and there may be intact 
subsurface features in portions of the habita- 
tion area. House patterns, refuse pits, burials, 
various activity areas, mound construction 
phases, and pre-mound construction features 
could be expected. Information with relation to 
Kent Phase characteristics and natural envir- 
onments could possibly be there. Private. 

B 8] The National Register listing in Benton 
County. [No. 64 is not on Delta area map.] 

64) DAVIS' MILLS BATTLE SITE at Michigan 
City, Mississippi. Scene of December 21, 1862 
defense by Federal garrison of Mississippi 
Central Railroad trestle over Wolf River 20 
miles north of Holly Springs. Failure of Maj. 
Gen. Earl Van Dorn's 3000 Confederates to 
defeat Federal force of 250 and destroy trestle 
was an humiliation, but raid was tactical 
success in that it forced the Federals out of 
North Mississippi and caused Maj. Gen. Ulysses 
S. Grant to forego plans of inland attack on 
Vicksburg. (Site is not in Delta but action here 
affected war in Delta.) 

B 9] The National Register listing in Carroll 
County. 

65) MALMAISON, in the Carrollton vicinity of 
Carroll County. On the edge of the Delta. This 
was mansion home of Greenwood Leflore, 
half-French, half Choctaw leader who negotiat- 
ed with the US. on behalf of the Choctaws for 
the Treaty of Dancing Rabbit Creek. It was by 
this treaty that the Indians gave up their 
primary claim to Delta lands and moved on 
Westward to the "land of the setting sun". The 
Indian heritage is first and foremost in the 
Delta and they were indeed the "original 
settlers". This home of the Choctaw leader 
burned in 1942. Listed in the Historic American 
Buildings Survey Site privately owned, 

CI] The National Historic Landmarks In the 
Delta. 

66) THE ISAIAH T MONTGOMERY HOUSE in 
Mound Bayou, Mississippi. (See Marker listing 
number 5) This is a red brick two story 
structure built over a full above-grade base- 
ment Built c 1910. this was residence of one of 



,75. 




Elegant corriage of Greenwood LeFlore. owned by French 
Comp Academy 

Mississippi's early Black leaders. Montgomery, 
a former slave of Jefferson Davis, founded the 
all-black town of Mound Bayou to afford Blacks 
the opportunity to exercise self-government. 
Private. 

67) HOLLY BLUFF SITE in the Holly Bluff 
vicinity of Yazoo County, Archaeological type 
site for the Lake George phase of the 
Mississippi culture. Private, 

D 1] Pre-historic National Register Sites in 
the Delta. All privately owned. 

68) THE ALLIGATOR MOUNDS, one mile 
west of Alligator in Bolivar County. Significant 
archaeologically because of its potential for 
answering questions on economic base and 
settlement patterns of several pre-historic 
cultures— the Marksville, Baytown, Coles 
Creek and Mississlppian periods, 

69) MONTAUK MOUND OR ROLLING FORK, 
west side of US, 61 North at Rolling Fork, 
Mississippi. The ancient Indian Mound, bet- 
ween Deer Creek and U.S. Hwy. 61. Federals 
Sherman and Porter were stopped at this site 
by a small Confederate force under the 
command of Brig, Gen. W.S. Featherston on 
March 22, 23, 1863, Sharkey County 

70) PARCHMAN PLACE SITE, Rudyard vicini- 
ty, Coahoma County. Type site for the Parch- 
man Phase, C. 1450 AD. Three platform 
mounds survive along with remnants of other 
smaller ones. 

71) HUMBER SITE, Coahoma County, Missi- 
ssippi. Site is a Late Mississippian Period (C. 
1400-1700 AD.) village and cemetery complex 
occupying two miles of a natural levee in West 
Central Coahoma COunty. Impressive in size, it 
represents the florescence of native American 
cultural achievement north of Mexico. At least 
"two native populations are represented at this 
site, 

72) WILSFORD (WILFORD) SITE, four miles 
SSW of Lula, Mississippi in Coahoma County. 
Site consists of a prehistoric village and a small 
rectangular platform mound. The apparent 
method of constructing the two houses which 
were in the construction area is unusual, there 
being nothing comparable mentioned in 
archaeological literature of the area. 

73) OLIVER SITE, Coahoma County. Excava- 
tions at the Oliver reveal two distinct occupa- 
tions of the area, the Coahoma (Baytown) 
period and the Huspuckena-Oliver (Mississippi 
Period) No evidence of transition from one 
period to the other has been found. For this 
reason as well as for questions concerning the 



Continued 



■v«l^^^v^N'^,'*l*•v•v^*■w^ 



\xi\ 




HISTORIC POINTS OF INTEREST IN 
THE YAZOO-MISSISSIPPI DELTA AREA 

INCLUDING THE NARROW BORDER OF HILLS 
WEST OF INTERSTATE HIGHWAY 55 AND NORTH 
OF INTERSTATE 20 

DENOTES THE APPROXIMATE LOCATIONS 
OF (1) STATE HISTORICAL MARKERS AND 
LOCATIONS OF PLACES ON THE NATIONAL 
REGISTER OF (2) HISTORIC PLACES, (3) 
NATIONAL LANDMARKS AND (4) PREHIS- 




This page is sponsored by the Jere Nash Foundation of Greenville, 
Mississippi. 








S9 



£Q 



~y\ 



TOPIC SITES. REFER TO PAGE 72 FOR A 

DESCRIPTION OF THE PLACES AND THEIR 

SIGNIFICANCE. 

DENOTES MAJOR ACCESS AND INTERIOR 

HIGHWAYS. 
PREPARED FROM MATERIAL FURNISHED BY THE 
MISSISSIPPI STATE DEPARTMENT OF ARCHIVES 
AND HISTORY, DELTA COUNCIL, AND W.A. 
PERCY LIBRARY. 



"V 



This page is sponsored by Mr. and Mrs. Bilbo Williamson of 
Greenville, Mississippi. 




HISTORIC SITES Continued 

area srelationship with the historic period, the 
site is very significant. 

74) THE NORMAN SITE, Quitman County, 
Mississippi. Site consists of a village occupation 
area of approximately 40 acres comprising 
three small mounds. Site has one of the most 
varied accumulations of prehistoric pottery 
types in the Yazoo Basin, especially those types 
associated with the Tchula period. 

75) JAKETOWN SITE, Belzoni vicinity of 
Humphreys County, Miss. One of the most 
significant archaeological sites in Mississippi 
because of its long, almost continuous occupa- 
tion through part of the Poverty Point period 
(C. 1700 B.C.-400 B.C.) and all subsequent 
archaelogical periods of the Lower Mississippi 
Valley. Probably initially settled shortly after 
1000 B.C. This site has yielded the only house 
patterns discovered to date for the Tchula and 
Poverty Point culture. 

76) THE WHALEY SITE, Whaley, Mississippi 
in Leflore County. Located at the confluence of 
the Little Tippo Bayou and the Yalobusha River, 
the Whaley Site is situated on a high natural 
levee on the outside loop of a large relict river 
channel. Testing of the Whaley Site could 
provide additional knowledge of the Baytown 
and Mississippian Periods. 

77) THE NEILL ARCHAEOLOGICAL SITE, 
Whaley, Mississippi, Leflore County. This site, 
situated on a natural levee formed by the 
Yalobusha-Tallahatchie River, lies on the north 
side of an old channel loop. Its primary 
significance lies In Its deep, undisturbed 
midden— a buildup of approximately eight 
hundred years. 

78) LANE'S CHAPEL SITE, Leflore County. 
Information available from Dept. of Archives 
and History in Jackson. Trespassing and 
digging on any of the state mounds Is against 
the laws of Mississippi. 

79) JACKS SITE, Phillip vicinity, Tallahatchie 
County, Miss. This site is a small village site on 
a natural levee of an old river channel loop, 
probably a relict Mississippi River course. 
Testing of the site could add Information on the 
Poverty Point cultural sequence. 

80) HOLLYWOOD SITE, Tunica County. One 
of the most well preserved archaeological sites 
with earthen enclosures. Construction of the 
site approaches the St. Francis type. Possible 
site for Quiz-quiz, pre-hlstoric town visited by 
DeSoto. 

*AII Information obtained from Miss. Dept of 
Archives and History, Box 571, Jackson, 
Mississippi. 




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LEFLORE COUNTY 

Every Delta town welcomes tourist or visi- 
tors. Most have some central spot for informa- 
tion but Leflore County ain't fooling. They make 
no bones about it. They want the visitors and 
they are ready. 

Greenwood is the heart of Leflore County. It 
is at the junction of Highways 82, 49E and 7. It 
has fine motels, eating places and peachy 
people. The town has seven parks. It is really an 
inland island formed by the Tallahatchie and 
Yalobusha Rivers meeting together to form the 
Yazoo River. There is a boat landing in the 
middle of downtown . A magnificent setting for a 
residential area is old Grand Boulevard. A 
visitor should ride down this street to see the 
homes and trees. 

The Staple Cotton Association is one of the 
world's largest and oldest cotton markets and 
will give interested visitors a tour through their 
offices. Federal Station in Greenwood is an old 
caboose made into a museum of railroad 
artifacts. In an old residential area Greenwood 
Cemetery is old and interesting. Visit Green- 
wood. This is the way to see the South. 

From the Board of Supervisors to the 
Chamber of Commerce to the daily newspaper 
to the people themselves, Greenwood really 
wants you to come. Be sure and visit Fort 
Pemberton Park on Highway 82 and get 
acquainted with The Star of the West. 

Visit historic Blantonia House, in walking 
distance of Williams Landing and Cotton Row in 



downtown Greenwood, the corner of Walthall 
and Church Streets. There are so few homes on 
tour in the Delta. This one, full of antiques and 
history, is open Sundays 1 'til 5 and Monday 
through Saturday, 10 until 5 p.m. Admission, 
$2.00 adults; children, $1.00. Tours, too. 

If you've only got a dollar to spend, save it to 
get into Cottonlandia on Highway 82 west. 
Private citizens pooled artifacts and money to 
set up this wonderful collection of primitive 
farm implements and tools, Indian artifacts, 
photographs and records in permanent housing 
for posterity and the tourist. Cottonlandia is not 
a quiet, eerie museum. It's a barrel! of fun for 
the light-hearted and a terrific educational 
experience for the serious. Cokes and souve- 
nirs are here. Cottonlandia is the Greenwood 
people. Everything in the museum is document- 
ed, correctly labeled and well displayed. Betsy 
Caldwell is curator of the Indian museum. 
Peggy McCormick (don't miss her classified ad) 
is head of the whole shebang. Special tours: 
Box 1635, Greenwood, Ms., 38930 or tele- 
phone Mrs. McCormick at 601-455-1416. 



-:W' i I 



ra 




Whether you're a tourist or not, act like one, 
put on low heeled shoes and get out to 
Florewood which is two miles west of Green- 
wood off Highway 82. It is owned by the State of 
Mississippi and operated by the Mississippi 
State Park Commission. Jane Biggers, energe- 
tic and fast moving, manages Florewood and 
produces the "extra-curricula" activities that 
are generated by it. It is a replica and 
reenactment of an 1850 Old South plantation 
with everything there but the mortgage. The 
plantation covers 101.4 acres. Its 22 buildings 
include the mansion, the cookhouse, gazebo, 
brick plantation office building, the outhouses 
(for men and women), carriage house, smoke 
house, laundry and servants' quarters. There's 
a lattice fence and a rose trellis. Costumed 
craftsmen show tourists how they make their 
wares which can be bought in the gitt and craft 
shop. A visitor can ride in a mule drawn wagon. 
Cotton can be seen growing or being harvested 
in the right seasons. Also on the plantation are 
a poultry house, commissary, loom room, 
schoolhouse, blacksmith shop, wagon shed, gin 
house, sorghum mill, animal pen, overseers 
house, hospital and driver's house. Everyone 
will enjoy a trip to Florewood but you can 
imagine the delight of a city child. Two dollars 
for adults, one dollar for students and children 
under six free. Special group rates by writing or 
calling: Florewood River Plantation, Box 680, 
Greenwood, Ms., phone 601-455-3821. 

[Continued on next page] 



Claudine Gar^ 
Cottonlandia. 



and Peggy McCormick, Friends of 



This page is sponsored by Mrs. Claude Youngblood, nee Naomi 
Law, of Shreveport, Louisiana and by Mr. & Mrs. Guy Simpson of 
Shaw, Mississippi. 




i^ h^ k. k- h- h. h. ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ 



•^w^^C^ -^^^^r^ -^^^^^ •^^^pj^ .^^^w^ <^^^m^ ^^^^^ t^^^m^ -^^^^^ ^^^^^^ -'P*^ » •• p ■ "^ ^ " »' ^" 



RIDING TOURS Continued 




Pl/>M//9//l}A 



V£ I'Vaa^ 



INDIANOLA 

Indianola, chartered in 1886, is a clean-cut, 
classy town of around 10,000 at the intersec- 
tion of Highways 49 W and 82. It has all the 
things a progressive town has— a newspaper, 
industry, a fine private as well as public 
educational system, parks, library, civic clubs 
and churches. Indian Bayou, which runs 
through the town, makes Indianola outstand- 
ing. It is a short drive along the Bayou, but so 
beautiful. This is one of the prettiest "collec- 
tions" of cypress trees in the Delta. Cross 
Highway 49 and continue along the Bayou to 
Pearson's Nursery. Another outstanding thing 
about the town is the unusual number of really 
fine homes, both new and old. Anyone interest- 
ed in homes, whether professionally or person- 
ally, will enjoy a slow drive around the 
residential areas. The downtown area has well 
known clothing shops. H/lany Deltans go to 
Indianola to buy clothing. The people in 
Sunflower County are independent and do not 
take any foolishness off anyone— strangers or 
residents. Good food is available here. 
INVERNESS 

Ride around Inverness on Highway 49 W 
south between Indianola and Belzoni. A 
tornado in 1971 destroyed most of the town 
and it is amazing the way the people built back 
so quickly, capitalizing on the storm's damage 
to the extent that they made an attractive and 
modern community. The library in the city hall 
is a delightful place to visit. The Memorial Park 
has a magnolia tree for each service man killed 
in World War II. 

If you can leave home on Christmas Eve 
night, the luminaries on the bayou will give you 
much pleasure as you ride along. This is a 
beautiful holiday sight and you do not even 
have to get out of your car. 

South of Inverness is one of the world's 
largest cotton gins— The Duncan Gin, Incorpo- 
rated. Tours and a briefing on the cotton cycle 
from plant to fiber can be arranged by calling 
the manager, Hunter Pratt at 265-3591 or 
265-2821. 

You can get good barbecue here at the local 
stand. 

MIDNIGHT 

Midnight is located between Belzoni and 
Yazoo City on U.S. 49 W. About the hottest 




thing in Midnight is the post office, zip 39775. 
Travelers and out-of-towners like to mail their 
letters with the Midnight postmark. Legend has 
it that during one of the poker games of the 
Silver Creek crowd, one of the players lost his 
money and then his plantation. The winner 
looked at his watch and said, "It's Midnight. 
That's what I'll name my land". 




r 




iGOO) LOOKING i)ELTA| 



A post office was established there in 1897. 
Mrs. Mary Robertson is the postmistress and 
she understands why her establishment is the 
big attraction in town. It's the only Midnight in . 
the U.S. Postal Directory. 




■~*'ife^ 




Colonial Domes in the Delta 



HIGHWAY 82 

Highway 82 goes across the United States. In 
the Delta going west, it goes by Greenwood, Itta 
Bena (drive around Mississippi Valley Univer- 
sity Campus here; a predominantly black 
university), Moorhead, home of Mississippi 
Delta Junior College, the school where many of 
the state's professionals have received their 
foundations for higher education; and don't 
forget Moorhead is where the Dog crosses the 
Southern. On through Indianola, Leiand, 
Greenville. If you have money, stop in Green- 
ville. You can buy anything here— a plantation, 
a fur coat, liquor, delicious hamburgers, waxed 
thread. Usually when a Deltan gets some big 
change (an inheritance or a big crop, etc.), he 
heads for Greenville. Highway 82 heads over 
the bridge into Arkansas here. 

MUSEUM AT FRIARS POINT 
To get to the North Delta Museum on the 

levee at Friars Point, turn west off Highway 1 
between Sherard and Moon Lake at a sign 
saying "Friars Point". The museum is closed 
Monday. There is a small admission. It's open 
until 5 p.m. all day Tuesday through Friday and 




«»■ ♦ 



National officiol of the Huegenot Society. 

open from 1 until 5 p.m. on weekends. 

There is a collection of articles here ranging 
in age from 80,000 B.C. to World War II. Most 
items are from the Delta. There is a wide 
variety from Indian artifacts to World War I and 
II uniforms. There is even an old horse drawn 
hearse plus primitive farm implements and 
Civil War pieces. There's lots of fun to be had 
here but allow plenty of time to make the visit. 

[Continued on next page] 




This page is sponsored by Rudy and The Burn Plantations, Glen 
Allen, Mississippi. 



J 



h^ h- h. h^ ki^ h. '.^li. h- ^ ki. h^ h^ h 



Cottonlandia is the history of the South; the land 

and the people who lived on it, worked it, fought for 

it and lie buried in it. From 10,000 B. C. to the 

present, their history is tangible here. 

Located in Greenwood in the heart of the Mississippi 
Delta. Hours 10 a. m. to 5 p. m., Tuesday through 
Friday; 1 p. m. to 5 p. m. Saturday and Sunday. 
Closed Mondays and major holidays. Located on 
Highway 82 West. Groups and Tours are welcome, 
but we ask that you make reservations in advance. 
Telephone: (601)433-0925 



h.h~h~h^kk^h~h~h.h.h~h~h~ M 



RIDING TOURS Continued 




THf DEVItS RACtlRMK 



An unexplained phenomenon called "The 
Devil's Racetrack" can be seen south of 
Lambert in Quitman County. It appears to be a 
man-made prehistoric engineering feat which 
looks like a canal. It is a shallow depression 100 
feet wide that extends from the west side of 
Highway 3 south of Lambert thence west along 
the north side Highway 322 toward the 
Mississippi River. It cuts all the way across 
northern Mississippi into an unknown distance 
in Alabama. Observers have reported that 
when it is flooded the water depth is uniform. 
Although many studies have t)een made no 
conclusions have been reached as to its age and 
origin. 

The three most commonly "accepted" causes 
of it are: 

1) It was a canal route of the Indians to 
connect the Tallahatchie and the Cold- 
water Rivers. 

2) It was caused by an earthquake. 

3) It was caused by drought. 

Another real puzzler about it is that no one 
knows how or why it came by its name, "The 
Devil's R?cetrack" 

■rSk 

YAZOO NATIONAL WILDLIFE REFUGE 

Go south of Greenville on Highway 1. The 
refuge is on the east side between the U.S. 
Navy Tracking Station and the turn to Glen 
Allan. The best times to visit are early in the 
morning or late afternoons, when the wildlife is 
more likely to be seen. All types of woods 
animals are here; birds that really sound off and 
alligators sometimes seen by the side of the 





road. The manager of this and the refuge at 
Tchula IS Mr. James M. Dale. He says the 
alligators are not vicious. They simply eat 
anything in their paths if they're hungry 
whether it's you or a possum. Drive slowly. 
Take your binoculars. And be grateful to our 
national program of wildlife preservation that 
the species here are protected. None of the 
inhabitants of the refuge were brought in. All 
are natives; even the alligators. Mr. Dale said 
this is about as far north as they do live 
naturally. 'Vou may contact Mr. Dale at his home 
and the office headquarters in the refuge. The 
phone number is 839-2638. It is listed on the 
Glen Allan exchange under— of all things— the 
Department of Interior. 




W.A. Speokes home neor Benoit during 1927 flood on 
Wovelond Plantation 

HIGHWAY 1 

Highway 1 or the Great River Road starts at 
Moon Lake and comes down by Friars Point, 
Sherard, Rena Lara, Hillhouse, Round Lake, 
Perthshire, Gunnison (the Warfield Quail Farm 
is here), Rosedale, Beulah, Benoit, Scott, 
Lamont, Winterville, Greenville, Wayside, 
Avon, Yazoo National Wildlife Refuge, Glen 
Allan, Grace and then runs into Highway 61 at 
Rolling Fork. 

WALTER REYNOLDS' PIZZA PLACE 

How about a delightful visit to a sidewalk cafe 
that is not on a sidewalk but on a beautiful lake? 

Turn off Highway 1 just south of Greenville at 
the Deerfield Park sign. It's about four miles off 
the highway. When you get to Deerfield Park, 
it's not hard to find Walter Reynolds' Pizza 
Place. You'll be glad you found it because you 
can order cold beer and pizza. It's all open air 
under a roof. If the air is still, a big breeze as if 
by magic comes off beautiful Lake Lee via a 
huge fan which Walter has placed on the lake 
bank. Spotless, all handmade by Walter 
Reynolds, it is really a sidewalk cafe in a remote 
setting, open only in summer. 

Across the road is a store handling everything 
for fishing. If, while eating a pizza, you're 
suddenly struck with an urge to go fishing, it's 
all there. 

But the best thing is just sitting, munching on 



a pizza, looking at the lake and drinking a cold 
coke or beer. 




Downtown Belzoni 



HIGHWAY 49 

Highway 49 comes into the Delta over the 
Mississippi River Bridge at Helena. It picks up 
at Clarksdale (formerly Quiz Quiz) to head 
south to Tutwiler. Here it splits into 49 E and 49 
W. Going southeast 49 E goes to Sumner, 
Webb, Minter City, Greenwood, Sidon, Cruger, 
Tchula and Thornton out of the Delta into Yazoo 
City, where it joins 49 W. 




Dick Holmon owns one of the Delta s 
planters. 




Belzoni Church 



[Continued on next page] 




This page is sponsored by the First Notional Bank of Bolivar County, 
Cleveland, Mississippi. 



tt^i*^ h^h^k^hi^hi^hi^h^hi^hi^h^hi^ 



RIDING TOURS Continued 

The companion highway, 49 W, leaves 
Tutwiler to go southwest through Rome, 
Parchman {the state penitentiary), Drew 
{Sklar's antiques and a good little restaurant 
here), Ruleville (hamburgers, shakes, etc. near 
intersection 49 W & 8 on E side), Doddsville 
(Senator James Eastland's hometown). Sun- 
flower, (look for Dodd's Store somewhere along 
here for sandwich and coke), Indianola, Isola, 
Belzoni, Silver City, Midnight. Louise and joins 
49 E to go out of the Delta into Yazoo City. 



MOTELS 

Not too many years ago if you didn't have 
relatives in the Delta, you couldn't spend 
the night here because there were no 
motels. You'll find several in each of the 
larger towns now— Tunica, Clarksdale, 
Cleveland, Greenville, and Greenwood. 
In most of the smaller towns there is at 
least one. The word is that the relatives 
got them built. 



DOWN 61 

Before you get to Tunica, going south from 
Memphis on Highway 61, be sure and stop at 
Watson's Store on east side of highway. There's 
a yarn and knit shop upstairs and there is talk 
in the South Delta that right in the town of 
Tunica there's a barbershop— Lane's— where 
haircuts are still a dollar and that the 
barbershop is the same as it was in 1901. 

After you've left Billy Holcomb's Sunflower 
Mall in Olive Edwards' Clarksdale, head south 
on U.S. 61 and take a spin through Duncan. The 
Oak Grove Retirement Home here is a swinging 
place run by loving people. They have a band, 
good food, trips and a full activity program. In 
little Duncan itself there is a house which 
formerly had a ballroom. A storm blew it away 
and It (the ballroom) was not replaced. Duncan 
is a good small town well tendedd by its town 
fathers. You can eat lunch here at the Booga 
Bottom Store. 

When you get to Shelby on 61, spend some 
time there. The old depot made a quaint and 
spacious library, light and airy— right on the 
railroad track on 61. There are beautiful murals 
in the Catholic church here, the work of a local 
artist. 

Leaving Shelby several miles south on 61 is 
the all Negro town of Mound Bayou. One of the 
two National Landmarks in the Delta is here, 
the home of Isaiah Montgomery, founder of the 
town. The medical centers here have saved 
many lives and performed a great service for 
the black people of the Delta. 

A little north of Merigold on Highway 61 
watch for the Airport Kitchen. There's some 



m 



good home cooking here. In Merigold ask for 
directions to the McCartys. Mr. and Mrs. Lee 
McCarty are potters. They think of things they 
want to make and then make them with their 
hands. Although the potter's art is deemed a 
fairly simple one, the injection of the wide 
ranges of earth colors and shapes and the 
subtle glazing definitely separate the McCartys' 
creations from the simple and the ordinary. 
They are popular both as people and as 
so-called commercial enterprisers. Whether 
they ever sold their work or not, they would 
probably continue as they are. They have never 
advertised or thrashed about trying to hawk 
their wares. The people who like the combina- 
tion of quality, originality and human pleasantr- 
ies while looking for artistic appointments will 
enjoy a visit to their home and business. 




McCarly s Tulip Garden ot Merigold 




Ole home in Merigold 

South of Merigold on Highway 61 on the east 
side of Highway 61 is the Rushing Winery. They 
welcome visitors and tasters. It is a new 
establishment, the first and the one and only in 
the Delta. 

Cleveland, the largest town in Bolivar County 
and home of the Delta State University and its 
former U.S. Women's basketball champions, is 
a busy business center. Anyone in the county 
with important business usually ends up in 
Cleveland to conduct either all or part of it. A 
traveler can find bed, board, movies and 
probably some night entertainment in field of 
sports, drama, music or art at Delta State 
University. Visit the Fielding Wright Fine Arts 
Building at Delta State. It offers a permanent 
and rotating gallery. Also, the Union on the 
campus displays thrilling works of art and they 
are not imported. 




FAITH healer: 

4» 



EasI of Highways 8 & 61 intersection, Cleveland 




^' CHINESLBAPTlST_CHURCH_j^ 

Eost of Intersection of Highways 8 and 61. Cleveland 

ROSEDALE 
by Joy Stubbs 

Rosedale, around 3000 population, was 
established in 1876 and incorporated in 1890. 
The Valley Bank, oldest in the county of Bolivar, 
was organized in 1898. Grace Church, Episco- 
pal, will celebrate its first 100 years in 1979. 
Other churches are Baptist, Methodist, 
Catholic, Presbyterian and Assembly of God. 

The new clock on the courthouse was a 
bicentennial project and was dedicated to the 
memory of Florence Stillers Ogden who initiat- 
ed the proiect to get the time piece installed in 
the spot provided for it 54 years before when 
the courthouse was built in 1922. The city 
park on Highway 1 offers a shady spot to picnic. 
Directly across from the park is the home of the 
late Sen. W.B. Roberts. Built in 1892, this 
home is now owned by his daughter, Mrs. LB. 
Austin. 



^j>^^m, 





' V*^* '^ 









•• i' « 



i^.ti 



i ROSEDALE ^ 

i COUJTTOUSE 

iBolivar County's second brick 
jcourthouse stood here. 1889 to 
1923. when fciundationqa\e way 
'to flood seep-watcr. First brick 
courthouse, at Prentiss, was 
destroyed in 1862 by Federals & 
later covered by Miss, waters'. 



[Continued on next page] 



jS 



This page is sponsored by Mrs. Robert Joseph Whitfield of 
Greenville, Mississippi and by Hollandale Agricultural Services of 
Hollandale, Mississippi 



/ 



ki^ ^ ki^ h^ h^ t^ h^ h^ h^ h^ h^ k^ 



CEZKlVb, (MISSISSIPPI 

'^W ^eaojct-Lr Spo"t of i:ke J^eVta 

oKis lovet-u ti.'ttle' viUaQe' located at t1n.e irctersec- 
i;\on_ oj" 3i.\oKwajjS ^1 aTii 8Z is kuown for Hs cWvnx 
and Kospi'tali'tx) . visii^ors are \nv\"tea to stop 
at: tVie attractive wf or mation cervter on t:1ae 
creek. bank, picnic at tW areas proviaecL neoxvxi^ 'j^eed 
t1ae resident iuucks , tkeu 'follow "tke crecL aown-^ 
down to tke spacions new liorarij and jriendly sloops. 

After a^yisid mtKe lousiness district wW.1a stilt re- 
flects its earlu Kistoru as a railroad town, still -j^ollowing 
tKe creek, atrip tKrouqK tlie loveli^ resideutial area leads 
do Sdoneville and tke T^elta'BrancKtxperimerrtSta'- 
dion. Xna exdra dread is in store -for Jjecemoer visitors 
iri tke aisplaij oj" Ckristttias drees and jloats m dke creek. 

Iceland , wkick was known la ds (nyemcy as dke, duell dlole 
of dke Jie.tta/' kas kecome dkrougk tke dedication and 
kard work (^ ker devoted cdizen^ '^ a nice place to vis id 
and an even nicer placedo uve . 



^U^h^h^ki^ki^ki^h^ is^dkia^ia^dk 



RIDING TOURS Continued 

Downtown at the corner of Front and Court 
Streets, Cobb's Restaurant has short orders 
and hamburgers. Further down Highway 1, The 
Cotton Boll has barbecue and sandwiches. 

A ride down Levee Street west of Highway 1 
permits a visitor to peek behind the houses on 
the west side of the street and see the levee 
practically in their back yards. The huge white 
Sillers home built in 1899 is on this street. Now 
owned by Mrs. John Pearson, it is across from 
the corner home of the late Walter Sillers, Jr. 
who served in the Mississippi House from 1916 
until his death in 1966. He was speaker from 
1944 until 1966. Mrs. Sillers resides there now. 

South of Rosedale off Highway 1 is the Great 
River Road State Park and even further south 
off Highway 1 is the new port which may turn 
Rosedale, now a small town, into a metropolis. 
At the junction of Highway 1 and Highway 8 is 
the industrial park. 

The soil in this small town must be very good 
(because of its closeness to the river') as 
evidenced by the brightest and prettiest 
flowers, trees and shrubs of any of the Delta 
towns. 




Rosedale girls make good mothers but they make 
superlotive grandmothers. 

DO YOU LIKE CYPRESS TREES? 

Ride Highway 7 from Greenwood (off 82) 
toward Holcomb and view the cypress brake 
near Morgan City. Near both Swiftown and 
Morgan City is the Malmaison Waterfowl 
Refuge. 

DOWN 61 

Continuing south on 61 you'll probably have 
to stop at Shaw for there's a traffic light in the 
middle of 61. Glance around. The residents are 
beautifying the bayou running the length of the 
town. Dinty Moore's restaurant is downtown. 




There are modern shops in Shaw. 

Next is Leiand, a town with much culture. The 
shops offer highest quality merchandise. The 
schools, both public and private, have winning 
teams. The ladies play the sharpest bridge. 
Their flower arrangements win at shows. Even 
when tennis wasn't "in", Leiand has always 
been a tennis town. Standards here are high. A 
downtown restaurant— The Pagoda; and Lillo's, 
a supper club. 

On down 61 through Hollandale, conserva- 
tive and progressive. There is a fine library here 
open to visitors. Like most of the people in most 
of the Delta towns, the people here are genuine 
and friendly and quick to spot a phony. You'll 
enjoy a visit at the Torrey Wood Memorial 
Library here 




,\ _ *.- ^,» 



A typical woodsy stream Deer Creek near Hollandale 




Small plantation house office at Percy 



The Henry Phelps at Nitta Yuma sell 
antiques. They also plan to soon open a 
verandaed museum and shop right on the 
highway. It is a very old house which they have 
moved to the highway spot. The Phelps are 
descendants of the Vick family— very old 
settlers in South Delta and Vicksburg. 

Stay on 61 and you'll go out of the Delta into 
Vicksburg, Port Gibson, Fayette, Natchez, 
Baton Rouge (red stick), and New Orleans. 




GOING TO NATCHEZ? 

Rosalie, Natchez, C 1820, hdqtrs. of Union Army 
during War Between States Grant, overnight 
guest here. Home on site of Notchez Indians' 
massacre of French at Fort Rosalie. 1729. Present 
stote shrine of Ms. Soc. DAR. Open, to public all 
year. (Sponsored by Estelle Fox White) 






■*^ 



Swimmers at Sugar Hill Swim Club neor Benoit 



This page is sponsored by Mrs. Joseph E. Stronge of Greenville, 
Mississippi. 



k.h^h.h-h.h.k-h~h~h^h. k^ h^ 




K^^^if^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^f^^^^^^yf^^^^^^l 



CUTEST KIDS Continued 





Catherine Leo Wixted, 5. granddaughter of Mrs. 
Maurine King, Show. 






Tom Eubanks, Commie Payne. Kate Eubonks, 
Trudy Poyne. Grands of the Billy Paynes, Lomont. 




Shannon Hood, 2, son of the Howard Hoods of 
Duncan. 




y 




Lilhen qcixoet to i^sedaUon Hiphu/aul 



Tc^Kz a yiciinc tour. Jn Spr'mc it's like FQin^lanci. 
Sliiie (iowh our ieve^ in cx^astfeboarcj bov; Yv hen it snows. 
Visit our stores, 



MftYOR ClTY COUHUi. 

tV\.j.5ftTreL ClYOE V/.ATCOCK 

J.Y.TftKE 



YlS'lt our 
GRk'RT RWtR RORD 
STftTG PnRKo^Hl&KWfiiYI 



Vkv^i Reviver from the fcovier. 
Dance mth< Pav'iL'ion 




iiivf VMTK. "f r<« time" off our 
n< w clock ©h our oJd cowihwftt 





?Rmc- \ou.R tsousmvT^owi 

NEW PoW Cai-itiSCTxHd viiTH 
^A^iOR WftTt^WAYS VlhTHE 

MISSISSIPPI Rwea 




[Continued on next page] 



fi^^^^}f^^^^^^^^}f^^^:^}f^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^ 



CUTEST KIDS Continued 





Frankie Winn, daughter of the Hal Winns & grand 
of the E.H Winns & Milliard Lawlers, 



Caroline, daughter of Dr. & Mrs. Allen R. Yates. 
Jackson, grand of the J.W. Yates, Jr.. Shelby. 




Cherie and Barry Fontonot belong to the Billy 
Fontenots of Hollandale. 





i 



5 \^ WftSHltioTOfi AVt'NUt' dowhfoujto greevw/Mt. 
OWt\leo&Op£R/lTtP 8Y TOKNSOM fflMlLY 5]WCe \°(iS 

DtUClOUiS HOMEMADE 




FRIEV OYSTERS 
V/EflL CUTLETS 

JIM'5 5RLFID ORESSiMG 
DESSERTS 



71 



OPfWI^ HOURS 



CLOSED SUNSnVS 




[Continued on next page] 



KJ|CJ|LJ|L:y.jy.j^:^J|L^J|L^^¥^^¥^¥¥¥¥¥¥¥¥¥¥¥¥¥¥^^^¥^^^^ 



CUTEST KIDS Continued 




TWeEDS; HERE I COME— 



*3 ^ -;N 



Kristopher Dickson, 4, Mary Viva Green, 7. Mondy Stovall, daughter of the Richard Stovalls of 
Russell Green, 4, Gwin Neol King, 1 year, the Hollondale. 
grands of Dr, 8, Mrs. George Green. 




■■'^' 


■'■? 






•'• ' 


.— ^, '' 


\ 


J 


'•' \ 








.# 








[UJhenthis Lii-tle BoYBlue 
Comes blouJinq^ his hoyr\ 
Th€ weeds wither down 
I]^ the cdton and the corn 



Comille Lovin, 6, daughter of Dr, & Mrs. Keith Rivers Diane Smith, daughter of Dr. & Mrs. Hugh 
Lovin; grand of Dr & Mrs Jock Gunn. C. Smith. 




nee 
Beans 



see 



Suzy Farmer, daughter of the Delbert Farmers. John Daniel Hewins with mother, Katie Dee 

Speakes Hewins. 



EUfrENETflRSl 

CLEVa/lWFORDmCIOR.mc. 

us Hiqj^wau^ t\ North 

FORP TRftcTc«^s Res:8^"J 8]2q 

FO«D EPavPMEWT 
XMOUSIRmu SALES 




[Continued on next page] 



CUTEST KIDS Continued 




Doty Farmer son of the Delbert Farmers 




Pendleton 8 Shoun Stovall belong to the Lee 
Slovolls of HoMandale 



Zhristopher Valentine, son of Mr. & Mrs. John Robert Torrey Nunnery , son of the Bob Nunnerys 
White Valentine. Cleveland of Hollondale 




Wary Margaret, daughter of Dr. & Mrs. John Thomos, son of Dr. & Mrs John Estes. 



(b MOORHfAD-thetovun 





s***^ 



WHERE THE SOUTHERN 
. CROSSES THE DOG" 



This intersection of the 
Southern R. R- <now the C. 
& O and the Yazoo Miss. 
Valley tnow 111. Central) 
inspired countless folk- 
.songs, stories & paintings. 
Crossing dates from 1895. 




%^>. 




wW-".A8it-ii" OF soaTtiERM csQsv.fj&DOc-: •-■■.■ 



ALLEN CANNING CO. 



on 



OISIY VE6(:TflaiE CftMNi^RVwSTftTE 




MISS. Ma ft JUNIOR COLltGE Sw.ti 
8 COUNTrtS.EXTWSlVeVOtATlOMRL 
PR06 R AWl ,mm~^.y:~r-,^... 



(Continued on next page] 



CUTEST KIDS Continued 




'%:'^ 



Mory Walcott. daughter of the Kenneth Wolcotts 
of Hollondole. 





Marydelle Hood, daughter of the Wilton Hoods. 



Wilton Travis Hood, son of the Wilton Hoods, 
Drew. 










AN INSPIRATION 

Maggie Burrus Barry lived close to her family, 
her friends and her church. 

Kindness and consideration for others endear- 
ed her to all. 




Maggie Burrus Barry, June 21, 1874 February 27. 1976 



A joyful and happy life was hers for 
ONE HUNDRED AND TWO YEARS ; 

The Barry home at Benoil, huih by Thomas F. and 
Maggie Barry in 1910. Now the home of the F,,M. 
Barrys. 

[Continued on next pagel 



¥¥¥^'¥'^^-¥''¥^¥¥¥¥¥¥¥¥¥'¥'¥¥¥¥¥¥¥¥¥^¥¥¥¥¥¥¥¥¥¥1 



CUTEST KIDS Continued 






Carolyn Ann Mills granddaughter of the H G 
Mills, Benoit 



Tony Wolker, son of the James Walkers, grandson 
of the Aubrey Wolkers 



Liso McGuffee. doughter of Mr, & Mrs. Herbert 
McGuffee. Jr of Jackson Grand of the MB 
McCortys of Ifta Bene, 



"VrRDEIN" «fe R,OBE]R,SOI«TIL.TD-A.R.CIiITElCTS 

ei© I^A.TC^ STR,EE:T / C3■R.EEa^J■"V-I:L.X^E IwIISS 3S701 / 601 333 3S3T 

P.O. :Box 1215 




ZiAA.'X'T' L. ■VIR.IDKN IIIFA-IA. 



P.A.XJI- !»■. R,0BH:R,S0I^ A.I.A 




IS 



OUR OLDER BUILDINGS ARE A VITAL LINK WITH THE PAST. THEY HELP TO EXPLAIN WHO WE 
ARE AND WHERE WE HAVE COME FROM. IN THE DELTA, WHERE RELATIVELY FEW BUILDINGS 
REMAIN FROM EARLIER DAYS, IT IS CRUCIAL THAT WE HOLD ON TO WHAl IS VALUABLE. WE 
SALUTE BURRUS HOUSE AND THE EFFORT TO RESTORE IT. 



[Continued on next page] 

¥¥¥¥¥¥¥¥¥¥¥¥¥¥¥¥¥¥^9i¥¥¥¥¥¥¥¥¥¥¥¥¥¥¥¥¥¥¥^ 



CUTEST KIOS Continued 






W- rr 



Dr. E.H. Winn, Jr., aged three. 



Warwick Alley, son of the F.D. Alleys. Grandson 
of Warwick Smitfis & C.C. Jacobs'. 



Charles Speakes Hewins, grand of the Chorles 
Speokes. 




Bloke Williamson, son of the Stanley Williamsons. 
Grandson of Ben Congers. 




\ 




Dabney Scott Young, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. 
Peter Dixon Young, Jr. and grand of Mrs. Peter 
Dixon Young and the Terrell Pottersons. 




Henry Fair Yates, 5, son of Dr. & Mrs. Allen R. 
Yates. Jackson; grand of the J.W. Yates, Jr.. 
Shelby. 



rm- 






Laney, Will and Gena. children of the Curtis 
Hoods. 



Mary Elizabeth and Belinda Dilworth, doughters 
of the Lyie Dilworths and grands of the H.B. 



Lloyd Eades Hogue, Jr. ond Mary Priestley Hogue. 
gronds of Mrs, F. Eades Hogue. 



"°°°'- [Continued on next page] 



CUTEST KIDS Continued 





/ 



\ 



y 




Margorel Blair Beckham, daughter of the C.A. 

Beckhoms o( Shaw 



Paige Gordon on her firs! birthdoy Belongs to 
Gordon family of Cleveland 



Kim, Wendy & Laura Yeager, doughters of the 
Robert Yeagers, III, Skene, 




Jay Heidel. son of the Jimmie Heidels. Grandson 
of the Buster Pooles 




Bill Kellum, son of the Stacy Kellums, Jr, 
Grandson of Stacy Kellums, Greenville, 



HSH FARMS, ,„,,,^„,, 

Rjpreg^ntina 3 generations of the //titer fam't/u 
fckrmin^ In Bolii/ar Couficc/, pre.se/it t/i-c' 
j!rtcto-rs of &ie SUS/JR HILL S'//IM CLaQ,}nC. 

CHffRTeaSD /977, 3^/^0*7 

TRAv/is SArrmFitrcD 

TCl{fl,r V-fOMPSON 
joe ROBlHSOf/ 

NOT p/crunet>: 




yeettna^ from 
'iSpaiw fairms 

lVthB.jGfcoa.t 
Sahflc^v€r^^H5. 

^n^559-»-v6 Jerry C j€fcocCt 
^iICorOefc;)cr 5hawj Ms- 

phon.3^3iJ^ SQmmyJe&flC 

OonDn-^icwans 



^¥¥¥'¥^¥¥¥¥¥¥¥¥¥¥¥¥'¥^¥ 93 ^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^: 



-2^' mm LEE 

taKesyoaonaspinaroiuf 



Lake Washington is thought to be two 
separate bends of the river, the north end 
having been formed first. Mother Nature 
supplied it with a connection to an underground 
water table making it impossible to deplete it by 
irrigation. 

Coming into view of the lake from Highway 1 
at Glen Allen, take a right at the Methodist 
Church. The first plantation you see is Linden. 
It is the site of the old Turnbull house which is 
one of the first house sites on Lake Washington. 
You will be impressed when you see the 
beautiful setting with its trees native to the 
area and as old as the Turnbull era. 





GRACEFUL BORDER 

As you continue, notice the cypress trees in 
the lake. Over a hundred years old, they 
provide a graceful border. The Oxbow Sailing 
Club is active here. You may see a sailboat race, 
as they have regular outings. The sail boats are 
colorful as they slide along the water. They may 
even cause a chuckle if one should topple over 
into the water. 

Several miles out of Glen Allen, you can see 
an authentic plantation bell on the old Skinner 
place or Caldmere Plantation. 

A few miles down the road you will see Mount 
Holly, built in 1855 by slave labor at the height 
of the Cotton Kingdom by the Dudleys. Folks, 
the man who built this house was no dud! There 
are about thirty rooms and a grand ballroom on 
the second floor Can't you picture the ballroom 
decorated with mistletoe and with boughs of 
holly providing the background for a gala 
Christmas party? I can see the huge silver bowl 
filled with egg nog and the glasses tingling with 
planters punch. 

TRINITY UNITED 

The original lighting fixtures are still there. 
The John Cox family owned Mount Holly until 



they gave it to Trinity United Methodist Church 
of Greenville in 1978. 

One mile down the road is the Ervin House of 
white frame. Part of it, the oldest residential 
structure on Lake Washington, was built by 
Junius Ward, C 1820. He was the first white 
settler on the Lake, but we understand he had 
numbers of Indians around for company. His 
descendants still live in the house. 

One mile down the road you can purchase 
minnows or crickets and rent fishing equip- 
ment. Before you go fishing, you might throw a 
few coins in the wishing well. It never hurts to 
wish a little before you fish! 

Still farther, another mile from the wishing 
well, on the right was a German prisoner of war 
camp during World War II. The farmers in the 
area used the German prisoners as plantation 
labor while they were there. 

Lakeside Grocery and Roy's Store feature ice 
cold beer and colas as well as ice cream and 
various candies. People native to the area can 
be seen here drinking cokes. 
FROM TACKS 

At Chatham you can see the once thriving, 
now abandoned. Old Stein Store. It was typical 
of the old country stores in the Delta in the 
1900's when they supplied everything "from 
tacks to coffins". 

Go left at the fork in the road and note the 
smallest post office in the state on your right. 
Get out your camera. The ones at home won't 
believe it unless you show it to them. Look to 
your left and you will see a ROUND cotton 
house which is really an antique. 

Continue to bear left. The first large house 
you see on your right is on Berkley Plantation. 
Circa 1850, the two story wooden frame home 
is owned by the Sidney Laws. 

The next house is Everhope Plantation, built 
in 1829 by Andrew Knox of Kentucky. It is the 
second oldest house on the lake. While many 
such houses can be seen in Kentucky, we are 
delighted to have one of its style down here. 
The house was built by slaves who must have 
been pretty smart as they used clay from the 
lake to make the bricks. They also built an 
architectural wonder, a self-supporting spiral 
staircase. 

POKER GAMES 

Soon you will see a sign that says Highland 
Club, the oldest private club on the Lake. In 
years gone by, plantations have been the stakes 
of poker games held here. 

You will pass through the McCool Place as 
you ride behind permanent residences and 
vacation cottages on the Lake which is a 
favorite spot for swimmers and skiers. 

After crossing a new concrete bridge, you will 



be on the Andre Worthington plantation and 
then go through the Middleton Plantation. As 
you continue, you will see a gigantic concrete 
hole on your left. This was the swimming pool of 
the old John Henry Plantation which was a 
swinging place years ago. 

Next you will ride through the Uzelle 
Plantation. 

The Paul Love Park Commission is next. It 
has a superb boat dock and overnight camping 
facilities. It is the perfect spot for a peaceful 
picnic— in a pretty park named Love. 
FOR BULLETS 

Next you will see picturesque Greenfield 
Cemetery at the ruins of St. John's Episcopal 
Church, the first Episcopal church in the Delta. 
The lead from the windows was used for bullets 
in the Civil War. 




Ruins of St. John's 

Wade Hampton, a general in the Civil War, 
was a vestryman. The building was destroyed 
by a cyclone in 1904. There are many old graves 
to explore. Here again you should get out your 
camera, for the vine covered ruins are ideal 
backgrounds for picture taking. 

You will soon find yourself back in Glen Allen, 
an easy going ante-bellum town. It is a 
farming-fishing community. It has an accessible 
public boat launch. You might stop at Harri- 
son's Grocery for refreshments. Off to your 
right near the Methodist Church is the old 
vacant Spencer home. A wooden frame house 
built about 1910, it was sold by a Mann to a 
Spencer. Drive a little closer. Can't you see a 
he-man selling this huge house to a lonely 
spinster? Seriously, it was Paul Mann who sold 
it to Marshall Spencer. No, he wasn't the 
sheriff. 

This tour can be made in much less than an 
hour's time. Any time of year Lake Washington 
is beautiful. And the fishing is almost always 
good. 



7ma 




sa. 



L 




^j 



BY EMMA LYTLE 



f 




-«*.. 



Along the WW. Denton & Sam D. Knowlton 
Memorial Highway 32 

Heading west, a ten mile section of Miss. 
Highway 32 between US 61 at Shelby and 
Mississippi Highway 1 on the riverside is a 
perfect example of the Delta countryside. 

Wide fields of cotton, rice and soybeans draw 
the eye to the monumental fringe of cypress 
trees. Some wooded land remains. Around 
Eagle's Nest Lake are good examples of native 
cypress. They stand close to the highway on a 
land fill as you cross the end of the lake. 

About a mile further, in the yard of a small 
red house on the south side of the road, a bottle 
tree "blooks". This is a bare bush festooned 
with blue, orange, and clear bottles. It is 
renewed every spring. Rumor has it that a 
bottle tree protects one from the hauntings of a 
mother-in-law. 

TRULY NOTABLE 

Next, the Keeler woods on the right and the 
Keeler home on the left. It is an impressive 
example of Victorian flavored architecture, the 



Keeler home for three generations. Truly 
notable 




The Keeler Home 

Soon, you will pass the second church of the 
local people and the end of Lake Porter. Then, 
iust before you reach Bogue Phalia bridge, on 
your left is the old Stafford house, restored 
residence of Curtis and Linda Hood. About a 
mile further is the cape cod style, old brick 
home built by the Maury Knowltons which is 
now the home of the Kenneth Hoods. 






^JW'':^^f^' :*^.^-^ 



t\ . i 








M8 



L 




*»-■ 






^ 1. 



A blooming bottle tree 

Between this house and the guest house is a 
replica of the serpentine wall built by Thomas 
Jefferson at the University of Virginia. Maury 
Knowlton, a former Delta Council president and 
a graduate of the university, built this wall. 
VISITORS WELCOME 

Next door is the Knowlton home, Bienaime, 
from a family name meaning "well beloved", on 
Needmore Plantation. Built C 1880 by Doctor 
Maddox, remodeled by Sam and Susie Gibert 
Knowlton and landscaped by Stuart B. Lytle, it 
now is the home Artist Emma Knowlton Lytle 
who will welcome visitors. 

Beyond the junction of 32 and 1 , the blacktop 
becomes Boyd Lane. Where it meets the levee 
road is the old Concordia Cemetery. On the left 
is the road to Gunnison and the Boyd family 
home. To the right, the road leads to the top of 
the levee Further north along the levee is the 
Bunge Corporation apd Dennis Landing. You 
may return to Highway 1 via the blacktop that 
services the Bunge corporation. 

Wandering around this part of the Delta can 
be rewarfling. 







The Burrus heirs September, 1978, Benoit, MS. 



n 



I— — *— 



This page is sponsored by the Corinth Video Company, Corinth, 
Mississippi 




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CHARTERED 1890 



CITY OF HOLLANDALE 



MAYOR J.W FORE 



A RAILROAD DEPOT 






A view of a corner of the Mississippi Room inside the 
depot. Notice the map. It's important. 



Shelby Public Library. View of east side along the 
railroad trocks ond facing the flag plaza. The double 
doors were formerly used for loading and unloading 
freight The former ticket office, now the Mississippi 
Room, is to the right. 



Two of the many trophies won by the City of Shelby 
The library serves as a convenient place (or displaying 
achievements won both by the City ond by individuals 



THE SHELBY PUBLIC LIBRARY 

is a part of a visit to 

SHELBY, MISSISSIPPI 

Come see more of the handsome depot/library. Appreciate the vision of the Shelby people and their wisdom and resourcefulness in keeping an 
important central structure of the past by r-designing it for continued usefulness and enjoyment— typical of Shelby people 

Tour the quiet streets scented w/ith fragrant jasmine and accented with lovely crepe myrtle. Take your time. Note with approval the individuality of 
Shelby people reflected in the interesting attractive homes with yards and gardens landscaped for the owners' personal use and pleasure 

See the churches, the schools, the cotton gins, the compress, the bean elevators, the site of the first flour mill m Mississippi, the lamp plant, the die 
casting plant, the parks, the banks— see all of Shelby 

Stop and buy at the attractive, well-stocked stores and markets. Notice with approval the outstanding records of the golf champions, the swimming 
champions, the tennis champions, the farming champions, the bridge-playing champions— and the hunting and fishing champions 

ROBERT GRAY, Mayor. JAMES E. BROWNING. City Clerk. 
Aldermen 

MRS. W.G. PHILLIPS, E.L. GRIFFIN, ROBERT PATTON, DAVID MALATESTA, ROBERT BEN BALDUCCI 

SHELBY, MISSISSIPPI 38774 



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BELZON l«« HUMPHRtYS COliMTT*"*" I'^^y^"' 





MILBRffi PEPPER 



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Humphreys, the youngest county in the 
state— consolidated on March 28, 1918, was 
formed from five neighboring counties l(Sun- 
flower, Holmes, Sharkey, Washington and 
Yazoo) and comprises over 412 square miles of 
rich agricultural acreage. The county vi^as 
named in honor of Benjamin G. Humphreys, a 
general in the Confederate army and the first 
governor of Mississippi after the Civil War. 
April 8, 1976, the county w/as proclaimed 
"Catfish Capital of the World" by Governor Cliff 
Finch because of the large volume of catfish 
raised vifithin the county's borders. 

Belzoni, the county seat located at the 
junction of Highways 49-W, 12 and 7, has much 
to offer a visitor. Do not be fooled 6y the 
small-town calm of Belzoni. Within its borders 
and a few miles are located many interesting 
people, places and events. 
PEOPLE 

Mr. Dan Bell, a member of the Board of 
Aldermen of Belzoni and Past-President of the 
Belzoni Lions Club, has a unique talent and 
hobby He makes violins. His residence is at 
505 Central and he is the local State Farm 
agent with offices on the corner of Jackson and 
Church streets. Stop by, chat a while and learn 
how Dan makes these beautiful instruments. 
Who knows, you might wish to have one custom 
made for yourself. 



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Mr Don Bell 



Mrs. Jon Cerame, the author of the recently 
published history of Belzoni entitled From 
Greasy Row to Catfish Capital, resides at 601 
Pecan where she has her pottery kiln and 



workshop. Mrs. Cerame is quite knowledgeable 
of local history and has an immense repertoire 
of humorous and quaint stories concerning the 
earlier days of Belzoni. Because of her love of 
fishing and vacationing on the Gulf of Mexico 
coast, Mrs. Cerame is most accomplished at 
shell art and jewelry as well as fired-clay 
serving dishes in the shapes of various fishes 
and shells. She accepts orders for her pottery 
and is eager and willing to demonstrate her art 
and to discuss the growth and development of 
her home town. 

Carmen Cummings, another local artist, is 
known for his rural scenes depicting old-time 
cotton life, i.e. hauling cotton onto riverboats, 
hoeing cotton, cotton field hands, and country 
general stores. Recent paintings by this highly 
popular local artist are on display at The Bird 
Cage, a quaint gift and frame shop owned by 
Mr. Cummings and located at 108 Hayden. 
Store hours are 9:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m. Monday 
through Saturday except Wednesdays when it 
is closed. Carmen and his wife, Frances, will be 
delighted to share experiences of the by-gone 
days of plantation row housing and plowing by 
mule They will also accept custom orders for oil 
paintings or framing. Do not miss their shop 
while in Belzoni. 

Rita Halbrook, the wife of state representa- 
tive David Halbrook, is a most accomplished 
contemporary artist. Maintaining a studio at 
201 Church, Rita works in abstracts and 
portraitures in the media of both oils and 
acrylics, Rita is a frequent participant in 
Mississippi Art Colony workshops and has 
exhibited extensively across the state. 

Mrs. Ethel Mohamed, the Ambassadress of 
Belzoni, has brought great fame to herself and 
her home town via her extreme talent at 
stitchery Mrs. Mohamed is constantly working 
on a new piece of stitchery which further 
delineates the escapades and history of her 
unique family Featured in the Bicentennial 
Folk Art Exhibition in Washington. DC, Mrs. 
Mohamed's works have gained national respect 
and notoriety Several of her pieces are on 
exhibit in a traveling art show sponsored by the 
Smithsonian and a European exhibit is anticipa- 
ted Mrs Mohamed resides at 307 Central and 
operates H Mohamed's Store at 115 Hayden. A 
visit with Mrs. Mohamed is a must. She is 

■ HHHaBHl98HlMHnHH 



always eager to show and talk about her work 
and her travels. Should you miss her on your 
trip to Belzoni, the Mississippi Department of 
Archives and History has published a full-color 
paperback entitled Ethel Mohamed: My Life in 
Pictures. 





Mrs. Ethel Mohamed 

Mrs. T.C. [Mildred] Pepper is a most 

accomplished sculptor who has exhibited 
throughout the state and maintains a studio at 
her residence, 705 Pecan. Of special note Is a 
series of bronze rural figures which she has 
created, i.e. a hobo, a man plowing his field 
behind a mule, two old men conversing on a 
park bench, a man leaning on a hoe, and many 
more. She is most capable of exquisite busts! 
Stop, visit, look and listen. 'You will be amazed 
at how she does her art and the degree of 
perfection which she achieves. 
PLACES 
Jaketown Indian Mounds, the oldest contin- 
ually occupied Indian site on the North 



[Continued on next page] 



BELZONI & HUMPHREYS COUNTY Continued 

American continent, are located just 3 miles 
north of Belzoni on state Highway 7. Surface 
collections and radiocarbon dating indicate that 
the site was occupied almost continually from 
1000 B.C. to 1600 A.D. Some of the site has 
been destroyed by soil moving, planting, and 
road building. The State Department of 
Archives and History presently owns only 4 
acres of this historic site and are preparing a 
road marker to designate and honor the site. 
The two mounds visible from the highway are 
protected by law from pilferaging. Please, do 
not attempt to climb or dig on the mounds. The 
Humphreys County Historical Society is seeking 
to preserve and develop the site through state 
legislation. 

Wister Gardens, at the north edge of Belzoni 
on state Highway 7, is a fourteen-acre garden 
created over the last 37 years by the late Mr. 
Wister Henry. Winner of the American Men's 
Garden Clubs' Johnny Appleseed Award, the 
garden features hundreds of brilliant spring 
tulips and azaleas, thousands of summer rose 




v#t ,■ 



Flamingos ot Wister ooraens 

bushes, and numerous autumn chrysanthe- 
mums highlighted against a backdrop of 
evergreens, winding paths, and a tree-shaded 
open lawn and lake dotted by long-legged 
flamingos. The Garden House with a glassed-in 
porch overlooks the garden and is available to 
groups as a meeting area provided, of course, 
that prior clearance is obtained from the 
garden's overseers, Mr. and Mrs. Humphries 
(601 247-3025). You may tour the gardens free 
of charge any day of the year between 8:00 a.m. 
and 5:00 p.m. 

The Humphreys County Library, the state's 
fastest growing public library located at 105 
South Hayden beside the county courthouse, is 
an excellent information center. If you need 
directions or information concerning travel and 
sightseeing within Humphreys County, contact 
the library during its regular hours of 10:00 
' a.m. to 5:00 p.m. Monday through Friday and 
10:00 a.m. to 4:00 p.m. on Saturdays. The 
library also features monthly art exhibits by 
various Mississippi artists. Featured in the past 
have been Emma Lytleof Gunnison, Bill Lester 
of Cleveland, Miriam Dabbs of Clarksdale, and 
the premiere showing of the Mississippi Art 
Colony II Traveling Exhibit. Exhibits have 
featured sculpture, oils, acrylics, watercolors, 
quilts, pottery, artifacts, stitchery, clocks, 
macrame, and Chinese Scroll Paintings. 

Producer's Feed Company, located north of 
Belzoni on Highway 49-W near Isola, is the first 



producer-owned-controlled catfish feed mill. 
Tours of this fine modern facility are available 
by contacting their main office Monday through 
Friday (601-962-7001). Tours of this mill are 
extremely educational and appealing to the 
younger traveler. 

Planter's Supply, an International Harvester 
dealer located at 104 Church in Belzoni, is a 
must see for any visitor. There is no need to 
leave your car for you may park in front and 
delight in the huge, beautiful, agricultural 
mural painted on its exterior by Johnny Purvis, 
another local artist. Various antique farm 
implements and farming techniques are depict- 
ed. You must see this work of art. 

Welfed Catfish, Inc., a catfish processing 
plant, IS located just south of Belzoni on 
Hghway 49-W. This newly constructed $1 
million plant cleans, packages, and ships locally 
grown catfish. Tours of this facility may be 
arranged by contacting their main office 
Monday through Friday from 9:00 a.m. to 4:00 
p.m. (601-247-3050). See their assembly line 
for cleaning and packaging the catfish. Learn 
the different cuts of catfish. It will be a visit long 
remembered. 




The 1978 World Catfish Eating Contest winner was Bill 
Wasser of Jackson 

Of historical note within Belzoni are the 
following homes. These homes are not 
mansions and are not noted for their unique 
architecture; they are listed because of their 
testimony to those brave pioneers who cut their 
way through the forests and braved the 
elements to form the town of Belzoni. 

The Jackson House at 402 Lee was the home 
of one of Belzoni's first and finest doctors. 

The J.B. Daniels House at 201 Jackson was 
the home of one of Belzoni's pioneer fathers 
who became a large land owner and Vice-Presi- 
dent of the Citizens Bank. 

The A.M. Levy House at 309 Central was the 
residence of one of Belzoni's first merchants. 

The L.S. Bradley House at 505 Central is 
presently being restored in honor of the town's 
first railroad agents, Mr. L.S. Bradley. 

The P.M. Pepper House at 401 Pecan has 
been occupied by the Pepper family continuous- 
ly for the past 70 years and has just recently 
been sold to Mr. and Mrs. Henry H. Gantz, III. 

Catfish farms and cotton plantations are also 
available for tour. If you wish to see how catfish 
are grown and farmed and/or how cotton is 
sowed and harvested, contact the Humphreys 
County Chamber of Commerce located at 109 
Jackson (601-247-2616), They will be more 



than happy to contact local farmers and 
arrange a special tour just for you. What an 
educational experience such a tour would be for 
you and your children. 

EVENTS 

Furniture Forum, a locally operated American 
and English antique auction house, is located at 
103 Church and opens its doors each Monday 
evening to antique dealers and collectors for a 
most enjoyable evening of antique auctioneer- 
ing. Items offered at auction vary each week but 
the entertainment is sheer joy. If you happen to 
be in Belzoni on a Monday evening, we will see 
you at the auction 

The World Catfish Festival, a genuine "down 
South" shindig held each April on the County 
Courthouse lawn in Belzoni, features an arts 
and crafts flea market, a beauty contest, band 
concerts, plays and puppet shows for the 
children, bus tours of catfish farms, catfish 
industry displays, live catfish swimming in the 
courthouse fountain, canoe races, a fiddler's 
contest, a catfish eating contest, and a catfish 
dinner on the grounds. This is truly Belzoni and 
Humphreys County at its best. 




Ms. Debbie Bridgets, 1977 Catfish Princess, and Governor 
Cliff Finch crown the 1978 Catfish Princess, Ms. Susan 
Simmons- 



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The 10,000-1- visitors to the 1978 WoHd Catfish Festival in 
Belzoni were delighted by the more than 95 different arts 
ond crafts booths in the flea morket. 

Good food, good times, good folks!!— that's 
Belzoni, Ya'll come an' see us! Ya' hea'? 



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GREETINGS from the SATTCR FIELDS of 




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Mount Holly 




Not too many old and historic homes remain 
in the Delta, for floods have taken their 
toll— also fires. But take a tour around Lake 
Washington, about 30 miles below Greenville 
on Highway 1 You will see MOUNT HOLLY, a 
majestic red brick home with the original smoke 
house and detached kitchen nearby. It was built 
on the lake bank when Lake Washington was 
part of the main channel of the Mississippi 
River. Steamboats came up to the landing 
bringing in supplies and visitors and taking on 
passengers. The house has changed hands 
many times, the last occupants being the 
Hamricks, artists and potters, who recently 
moved to Jackson leaving the house vacant. 
Still more recently the owners. Mr. and Mrs. 
John Cox of Greenville, deeded Mount Holly to 
Trinity United Methodist Church. In a beautiful 
setting with quite a few acres around it, it has a 
great potential as a retirement home. 

Across the lake stands EVERHOPE, the home 
of the late Mr. and Mrs. William C. McKamy. A 
two-storied red brick structure, it has an 
architect's dream— a beautiful unsupported 
staircase. Also, it has huge windows and 
massive doors. It is occupied by Charles 
McKamy who farms the plantation with his 
father, William McKamy. A contemporary home 
nearby is the home of the William McKamys. 

The P.L. Mann home, LINDEN, on the other 
side of the Lake, is also an interesting structure 
and is noted for beautiful murals on the walls of 
the entrance hall. 

Also in the area is a vast hunting preserve, 
formerly the property of the Swan Lake Hunting 
Club. Many of the members were from as far 
away as Chicago, Atlanta, etc. Before the days 




of automobiles the members arrived by train 
and completed the trip by wagon or coach. It 
was a wild duck paradise and a hunters heaven. 

On Highway 454 which connects Highway 1 
with Highway 82 at the Greenville-Lake Village 
Bridge is historic REFUGE PLANTATION and 
the house on the Mound. Next to it is 
HOLLYWOOD PLANTATION, once a part of 
Refuge. It was named Hollywood because the 
original house, which burned, was set in a 
grove of majestic native holly trees. Holly trees 
are no longer seen in the Delta. Old slave 
dipping vats have been unearthed on the 
plantations. Also, buttons, buckles from Union 
soldiers and even a cannon ball have been dug 
up. Presumably the cannon ball was lobbed 
from a gunboat during the Civil War. 
THE PATRIOT 

If you are an art buff be sure to drive through 
the GREENVILLE CEMETERY on South Main 
Street. To get there, turn South off Highway 82 
at the corner of Main and 82. Directly across 
the street from St. James Episcopal Church, 
drive through the first entrance of the ceme- 
tery. The handsome iron gates were given by 
the Jere Boyle Nash family in memory of Wilda 
Heard Nash. Continue through an avenue of 
ancient cedars and, in sumimer, magnificent 
flowering crepe myrtles. After a right turn you 
will see the life-sized bronze statue entitled 
"Patriot". It depicts a knight in armor and was 
executed by the famous sculptor, the late 
Malvina Hoffman, who came to Greenville to 
oversee its placing and foundation planting. A 
tribute to the late Senator Leroy Percy, the 
statue was given by his son, the late Greenville 
poet and writer. William Alexander Percy. 



Small boot on nvet 




[Continued on next page] 



This page is sponsored by the Bank of Cleveland and by Mr. and 
Mrs. Earl Warren of Cleveland. 




GREENVILLE Continued 




the steps of the bank. Children love to "ride" on 
his back, put pennies for good luck in a crevice 
in his back and legend has it that his nose was 
worn shiny by harried planters going in to make 
a loan. They rubbed his nose for good luck. How 
fortunate it is that it is all being preserved. 



Malvina Hoffman's Potriot 

The nnarkers of the poet's parents state: 
Leroy Percy-1860-December 24, 1929. (and) 
Camille Bourges Percy- 1862-October 15, 1929. 
A quotation by the poet, Henley, is on the stone 
panel. 

THE REV. DUNCAN GREEN 

ST. JAMES EPISCOPAL CHURCH, directly 
across from the cemetery, is full of beautiful old 
world stained glass windows and handsome 
brasses including the altar rail, lecturn and 
cross. In the sacristy is a window dedicated to 
The Rev. Duncan Green, rector from 1872 until 
1878, who gave his life nursing the yellow fever 
victims. Inscribed are these words, "Greater 
love hath no man than this— that a man lay 
down his life for his friends". St. John XV-13. 

Another Percy memorial is the WILLIAM 
ALEXANDER PERCY MEMORIAL LIBRARY at 
the corner of Main and Shelby Streets. In 
addition to the many valuable collections in the 
Mississippi Room, there is a bronze bust of the 
late Hodding Carter by Leon Koury and a 
painting of William Alexander Percy by the late 
Wynn Richard, also of Greenville. 

During the school year the library is open 
Monday through Thursday 9:00 a.m. until 8:00 
p.m. Fridays and Saturdays it is open from 9:00 
until 6:00 p.m. Sunday afternoons it is open 
from 1:00 until 5:00. An. interesting microfilm 
of the censuses of 1840, 1850 and 1860 are 
here. There is an auditorium where art exhibits 
are generally hung. 

NO EXPENSE SPARED 

Take a look at the FIRST NATIONAL BANK 
BUILDING on the corner of Main and Poplar 
Streets. Now the offices of Matt Virden III, an 
architect, the magnificent structure of stone 
was chartered in 1887 and is one of the m ost 
beautiful examples of its period. Elevated, as 
most buildings were to avoid ravages of 
overflows, it is approached by stone stairs 
leading to a collanade through glass windowed 
doors and ornamental iron work. 

The interior, for which no expense was 
spared, is built of mahogany with Italian 
marble, stained glass and handsome brass 
appointments throughout. It is now listed on 
the National Register of Historic Places. 

A new bank is in the process of being built. 
Featured there will be "Fairbanks", the bronze 
lion that has stood all these years at the foot of 




Fairbanks The Lion 

Recently opened near Greenville is the 
WARFIELD POINT PARK which gives a magnifi- 
cent view of the Mississippi River and river 
traffic. Owned and operated by Washington 
County, the site was formerly Warfield Landing 
before there was a bridge from Mississippi to 
Arkansas. The landing was used by the ferry 
taking cars and passengers across the river. 
Although it was abandoned for many years, the 
potential was finally realized for a park site. 



Lorge tow boot seen from Worfield Point 

At the well run and supervised park, passes 
are required for going in and out. There are fine 
facilities for picnics and a designated trailer 
area with hook-ups. The large pavilion has huge 
grills and electrical outlets. Many of the picnic 
tables with shelters overlook the river. A 
lookout tower is there for viewing Ole Man 
River The pavilion can be rented for private 
parties for $15.75. The picnic tables overlook- 
ing the river are rented for two dollars each. 
There are free tables available at the back of 
the park. Reservations must be made for trailer 
parking. The park has a fine road system and 
parking facilities. It is well lighted at night. The 
telephone number is 335-7275. 

ENTRANCE MARKED 

To get to the park, drive out Mam Street in 
Greenville to Highway 82 West turn left for the 
Bridge Route. The turn to the right where you 
enter Warfield Point Park is well marked. There 
are 27 enforced rules for park users. 

Enroute to the road leading to the park you 
will pass "FELICIANA", the former home of the 
late Hodding Carter and his wife. Betty, who 
now lives in Greenville The home now belongs 
to the Michael Retzers Next to FELICIANA is a 



1021 



protected cypress brake, bought and owned by 
the Greenville Garden Club, the first in 
Mississippi. This tract is for the preservation of 
a disappearing species. 

A note from Mrs. G A. Mahoney describes the 
WINTERVILLE MOUNDS PARK, operated by 
the Mississippi Park Commission, as being 40.9 
acres. It was acquired by the City of Greenville 
in 1939 from the Connecticut General Insur- 
ance Company. In 1939, according to Mrs. 
Mahoney, Mrs. Paul Gamble started raising 
money to purchase the site for the Greenville 
Garden Club which maintained a continuous 
interest in the project. More than anyone else 
Mrs. Frank Robertshaw worked hard and long 
to establish a roadside park at the historic 
Mounds. In 1960 the lease on the Mounds was 
turned over to the State of Mississippi and in 
1963 restoration work was started and has 
continued to this date. In addition to the late 
Mrs. Gamble and the late Mrs. Robertshaw, the 
late Mrs. Wynn Richard Taylor and the 
Greenville Garden Club were interested in 
establishing the site as a tourist attraction. 
Mrs. Mahoney is the wife of G.A. Mahoney, 
curator of the Mounds Park and Museum which 
is opened daily at daylight and closed at dusk. It 
is closed on Christmas Day. A fine collection of 
artifacts are on display. 

FINE RESTAURANTS 

Three fine restaurants in Greenville are the 
Marina on Lake Ferguson, How Joy's on 
Highway 82 East, and Doe's Eat Place on 
Nelson Street. The Marina is a floating 
restaurant. It's open from 7 a.m. until 10:30 
Tuesday through Sunday. They have a regular 
business lunch daily, good seafood and plenty 
of room for private parties. How Joy's serves 
authentic Cantonese food and features a 
luncheon special from 11:30 until 2 p.m. 
Sunday through Friday. Open from 11:30 until 
10:30 through the week. How Joy's opens at 5 
p.m. on Saturdays and closes at 10:30. Doe's 
Eat Place is open all day long at 502 Nelson 
Street but only for take out orders of hot 
tamales until 6 p.m. when they start serving 
fried shrimp and steaks. Everyone who comes 
to Greenville should eat their hot tamales, too. 

Another fine restaurant is The Crown at the 
Antique Mall out from Indianola It is owned by 
the Roughtons who learned about this type of 
fine dining in England. You have to have 
reservations. The food is excellent. 



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MAYOR 

CLERK 

ATTORNEY 

ALDERMEN 



MARSHALLS : 



Preston Riley- 
Joseph McVay 
Laurence Mellen 
Lorraine T. Acord 
George Evans 
Kenneth McClure 
Leroy Mullins 
Marcie Mullins 
Stanley Weeks 
Charlie Schaffer 



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OUVE EDWARDS' ClARKSDMfeoAHOMftWUNPf 



Coahoma (Choctaw for Red Panther) County 
was formed in 1836 as part of the 558 square 
miles the Choctaws ceded to the federal 
government by Dancing Rabbit Creek Treaty. 
Within fifty years from the signing of that Treaty 
all property was in the hands of settlers or 
speculators— land to be cleared of virgin 
timt)er, land to be farmed composed of rich 
alluvial soil sometimes 30' deep. Today the 
huge native cypress tree is a rarity. So, too, the 
scalybark and hickory nut and the stately holly 
tree. Drained are the sleepy bayous and tamed 
to a great extent by high levees is the 
Father-of-Waters, as the Indians so expressive- 
ly spoke of The River. Much later the Spanish 
explorers called it the Rio Espiritu or River of 
the Holy Spirit. 

Gone and almost forgotten, too, is the 
riverside railroad that once paralleled the River 
Road. Like the steamboat its function to open 
the rich Delta to world trade was completed. 
So, too, passed the oxen teams so necessary in 
winter and spring to buck the hub-deep gumbo 
mud. We mention these changes so that the 
current face of the land be rightly read. 

Change being the law of nature and man's 
civilization, the true tenant board-and-batten 
cabin has been erased from the scene within 
the last decade. Picturesque, practical and 
climate oriented, it was an architectural 
relative of the original Cape Cod house. Early 
settlers brought the plan and design with them. 
It was the pioneers first home, built of logs, 
then later of sawed cypress. As families grew it 
doubled in size with a dog-trot hall or 
breezeway t)etween the duplication. Climate 
control! As the farmer's money and land 
accumulated, dictating finer homes and living 
conditions for the family, the residual breeze- 
way became an enclosed entrance hall, an 
artery for traffic, a draft producer in the turgid 
summers. 

Great dollops of time have passed since the 
sea stood here, then withdrew. The Great River 
and the Ohio River meandered at will all over 
the place as geological maps show. So when 
Hernando DeSoto, one of the Conquistadors, 
set out to conquer the so-called New World, the 



date seems fairly recent. But the happening 
was important, especially to the Indian who 
vanished in a relatively short time from this 
area. Three men kept record? of DeSoto's 
expedition. So far, from alia vailable informa- 
tion historically and archaeologically the 
Spaniards "discovered" the Great River on May 
8, 1541, in what is now Coahoma County. And 
we would pause here to say the term Sweet 
Coahoma was often applied by early settlers 
with reference to Coahoma Sheriff, daughter of 
the last Choctaw who remained in this area. 
The Sheriff Ridge Road between Friars Point 
and Clarksdale was named for this daughter. 

To the archaeological buff, to the folklorist, to 
the casual visitor we would say Welcome! to 
Coahoma County— a gem yet to be polished and 
fully evaluated. The treasures are here, waiting 
to be unearthed by qualified workmen. What- 
ever your interest we suggest your exploration 
is best begun by contacting in Clarksdale, the 
county seat, one or all of the following: 
The Chamber of Commerce 
The Carnegie Public Library 
The Mississippi Archaeological Survey off. 

HILLHOUSE— Near here in the 1930's an 
early experiment in cooperative living and 
farming was set up and drew young men and 
women from all over the USA. The Delta Co-op 
Farm was formed and promoted by such 
international figures as Sherwood Eddy, Rein- 
hold Neibuhr, John Rust and William Amberson 
(a physiology professor at University of Tenn.; 
Rust was inventor of cotton picker). The 
lifespan of the early experiment in cooperative 
living was relatively short. Watch for road and 
sign directions to nearby DESOTA LAKE, an old 
River cutoff. 

RENA LARA— Here, a turn west toward the 
levee will also lead to DESOTA LAKE, popular 
fishing spot. Straight ahead is Sunflower 
Landing, the end of Charlie's Trace which was a 
local portion of an ancient Indian trail that ran 
from the site of Savannah, Ga. to where 
presently San Diego, Calif, sits with a branch off 
along the way to Mexico City. DeSoto is thought 
to have used this trail to the Great River (see 
8-ton granite marker at junction of U.S. 61 and 



Miss. 6 highways north of Clarksdale. 

An eastward turn at Rena Lara ends at 
BOBO, an early Delta settlement named for 
Col. Robert Bobo, son of Fincher Bobo. Colonel 
Bobo was a renowned bear hunter. When 
President Teddy Roosevelt, for whom the toy 
teddybear is named, planned a hunt in the 
lower Delta, he extended a special invitation to 
Robert to join him. Because of a prior 
commitment to hunt with visiting friends from 
Illinois, Robert and his large pack of bear dogs 
could not join the President on the hunt. It was 
wrongly reported in Washington headlines as 
having political overtones, and the Colonel had 
to make a public denial and statement. The fifth 
generation of the Bobo family occupies the 
large residence in Bobo. Highway 61 is 
accessible from this point. 

A few miles north on River Road from Rena 
Lara, General Nathan Bedford Forrest owned 
and lived on 1000 acres of land at a point 
(unmarked) called Green Grove Station. 

SHERARD— Headquarters of the extensive 
Sherard plantations, settled and opened up in 
1874 by John H. Sherard. The papershell pecan 
orchard is one of the earliest in this section. 
Nuts were shipped to England's Buckingham 
Palace and other European customers many 
years ago. An east turn here leads to 
Clarksdale, the county seat. North is Friars 
Point and the Arkansas bridge. 

FARRELL and STOVALL— Near here are the 
Humber-McWilliams and the famous Carson 
Mounds. These sites are important to the 
recent theory advanced by Jeffrey Brain, 
Director, Peabody Museum, Harvard Unive- 
rsity (see Special Publication CLUES TO 
AMERICA'S PAST, National Geographic Socie- 
ty;) that Clarksdale is built on the site of 
Quizquiz, the capital of a rich Indian province, 
described by DeSoto's journals. Representative 
pottery from the Humber site is in the collection 
on exhibit at Carnegie Library in Clarksdale. 

FRIARS POINT— River town with Civil War 

history. The county seat for many years (1848 

on). For complete story and exhibits including 

an original settler's cabin, visit the North Delta 

[Continued on next page] 



COAHOMA COUNTY Continued 

Museum. See the old brick saloon building 
facing the levee, only remnant of town's early 
Main Street. The Sunflower River is said to 
originate in the ditch beside this building. 

MOON LAKE— (west end) See historical 
marker for DELTA, early settlement and county 
seat that fell into The River. Approximately 
where levee now stands was once a large 
2-story building with 16gable windows in upper 
story. Charles Lindberg, barnstorming around 
the country in his early days, was forced down 
here by engine trouble and mentions this and 
Friars Point in his first book. 

Intersecting road circles south side of Moon 
Lake, an old River channel The YAZOO PASS is 
crossed by bridge. Union forces in 1863 were 
ordered by General Grant to open this Pass and 
connect with the Coldwater-Tallahatchie- Yazoo 
Rivers for the Vicksburg siege. See marker on 
River Road near junction with Highway 49 to 
Arkansas This is head of YAZOO PASS where 
Union gunboats and men entered from The 
River. 




TAIOO PPkSG 



COAHOMA— Many recorded Mid-Mississipp- 
ian and later Indian sites and mounds. All on 
private property. The salmon Mounds can be 
seen from Highway 61. They stand beside huge 
depression which was once Mississippi River 
bed. Geologists say beneath that is a very 
ancient filled-in Ohio River bed. 

Between COAHOMA and MOON LAKE (inac- 
cessible to public) archaeologists found 
remains and evidence of unusual Indian 
habitation built on platform supported by 
stilts— a discovery without parallel in national 
recorded excavations. One of the DeSoto 
diaries mentions such a building. For more 
information contact the Miss. Archaeological 
Survey office in Clarksdale. 

JONESTOWN— Between RICH and here is 
Matagorda Plantation, once the home of John 
Bell Hood, son of the Civil War general. Jesse 
James, the outlaw, planning to rob a prominent 
Friars Point citizen, once spent the night at the 
commisary store. He was recognized and 
pursuaded not to carry his plan out. He left the 
county without incident. 

Governor James Lusk Alcorn's home, built on 
his plantation and named Eagle's Nest in honor 
of the genuine one in a nearby cypress swamp, 
no longer exists. The Governor, in lifesize 
marble, stands in the family cemetery (private 
property) on an Indian mound beside Swan 
Lake. He had the statue carved in Italy before 



his death. Swan Lake, once a duck hunter's 
paradise is supposed to be the furtherest point 
north for alligators of very large size. 

LYON— The home of Major Lamar Jacque 
Bonaparte Mirabeau Fontaine, writer and 
lecturer, whose controversial Civil War exploits 
and superb gun marksmanship were question- 
ed until recent years. Major Fontaine is one of 
the legendary figures of this area, having been 
kidnapped and raised in Texas by Indians when 
a boy. 

North of LYON about 2 miles is a fine example 
of an early plantation commissary and store on 
the J.T. Fargason plantation named Clover Hill. 

The Bobo-Moseley Cotton Gin at Lyon can be 
toured by appointment. In ginning season it 
turns out approximately one bale every three 
minutes. The Planters Manufacturing Company 
(extracts oil from cotton seed and soybeans) 
nearby is another facet to the cotton industry. 
Apply at the office for permission and a guide 
for a tour. 

SHUFORDVILLE— Oldest inland settlement 
in the county. 

SHERIFF RIDGE ROAD-Old road between 
Friars Point and Clarksdale. Named for 
Coahoma Sheriff, a Choctaw maiden. Coahoma 
County "Aggie" High School and Coahoma 
Junior College are both of educational interest. 
"Aggie" was established as part of the county 
school system for Negroes in 1924, "first" in 
the state. The college was the first state-sup- 
ported junior college for Negroes in the state 
(established 1949) under the old system of 
"separate but equal", 

CLARKSDALE— Incorporated 1882. Entering 
by Sheriff Ridge Road, you will notice that the 
city was first built on the banks of the Sunflower 
River, the site of a fortified Indian village. 
Mounds were formerly where the Courthouse 
now stands. See the Indian pottery collection in 
the Carnegie Library opposite the Courthouse. 
Drive east on First Street two blocks to St. 
George's Episcopal Church at the corner of 
Sharkey and First Streets. Next door to the 
church at 106 Sharkey is the rectory where 
Thomas Lanier (Tennessee) Williams lived with 
his grandfather. The Rev. Walter E. Dakin, as a 
youth. He used Coahoma County names in his 
play, "The Glass Menagerie". 

ROUNDAWAY— S.H. Kyle, plantation owner, 
established a chair factory as employment for 
DP's (Displaced Persons) from Latvia after 
World War II. These people, with U.S. assis- 
tance, fled their homeland when Russia claimed 
and occupied it. 

The walls of the Warehouse Restaurant in the 
Sunflower Mall in Clarksdale are filled with 
early photographs and pictures relative to 
Clarksdale's early history. Material on Quiz- 
quiz, the ancient Indian village, can be found 
there. 



b^&i>r^MS-5s4^ii£?-&llS->!i4^&i, 



Mr-0cr\V/(\lK^v (sfi'iciN^ a. 
program tor the Kiuuams Club 
U< u)'iU haue tuDo little lic^nxs 
to d(Kf)c«. /Inotker biqone 
u;'ill tap <Uiice. Wt^.Wassorx 
uni\ vnaHeatcklK. Mrs.Swton 
U}\i\ pla«j tke piftho for the 
Wq^roes to <Vxnc€. Soan<4s 
uKe.<\joo<i prooram. 

r^i5 ^^^^ ^^op\€ oT 

'^'^ L f. 3<^^^ ah«av;€h 
0^4 HqU fxxrty.Thcu hod 
tickets costing adfiVnc. 
i-t hecxucn w<xi on the 

ticket, cioa o/iUtfclcold 

food. If hell was on it. 

KfOU. UJOiX\6 9€ t hot tooA! 

i»ve»n€xt vnorninq Mrs* 

Billu Dean 

FAIRFAX PLI\NTftTlOW 

TRiescTr.Ms. 

OWNE R 




^WH| / 




fe'^ ■ 



Ehtrance to Fairtox 



BOLIVAR COUNTY FARM BUREAU, INC. 
Telephone 601/843-4061 214 N. Pearman Cleveland, Miss. 



IS DEDICATED 



4iiil(^Me 





'^'*fo the creation of a^egislative and economic "^ climate that 
'^ t brings about the highest poss^le net faxm income f or farmexg 
oil t^ of Bolivar County .-^:~:r^^St3^>^' . X 

To the development of policies through democratic processes 
t the grassroots level which create an accurate voice in 
ublic affairs for the majority of farm families 

providing economic services for farm families designed 
reduce the cost of production 

To insist on an aggressive marketing policy at all levels .J 
bring about the highest market prices for all commodities 
produced in Bolivar County 

.- To enlisfall farm families in our county Farm Bureau organ- 
% ization tp achieve the maximum credibility and effeptiY^il^ss 




V ■[ •" Jj'^^^'v^^fV^^fe; 




"© 



^ 



~ ' A. V. Henry / 

Vice President 



Donald R. Beverly, 
President 



Travis Satterfield, 
Vice President 



N. L. Cassibry, Jr. 
Secretary-Treasurer 



Nona Watson 
Executive Secretary 



TUB ■E.QAB, TEA POT ROAJB -^ 

HfTH 1@^t UJill stiouyoattiettiai) 

at tfi^ junctcon of fl/^huJWj^ I ^^2 ,/?ea(/ rfoaarcf t!/)e /et/ee 



^"^ 

^^^ 




/ 



\ 







CONCORDIA 
CEMETERY 



Oldest cemetery In Bc^lvar 
County. Used by Qoiicordia 
settlers as eariy as 1848. 
Concordia Methodist Church, 
first <*urch In this area, 
hunt on thls^te. 




*^R«a 



For a leisurely Sunday afternoon drive, begin 
about two miles north of Gunnison at the 
junction of Highway 1 and 32. Near the levee is 
Concordia Cemetery, the oldest in Bolivar 
County, with tombstones dating from the 
1840's. After passing the cemetery, follow a 
winding gravel road to a point where it crosses 
the levee. 

Beyond the levee are heavily wooded areas 
belonging to Donelson Point and Po-Boy 
Hunting Clubs. Clusters of cabins line the 
route, one of which is a house-boat completely 
encased in screening. 

Rambling along the dirt roads, the traveler is 
likely to see lots of deer, wild turkeys, squirrels. 



rabbits, raccoons and such interesting land- 
marks as the following: 

The Tub Road, so named for an old rusty tub 
that some hunters or a timberman nailed to a 
tree years ago to mark a turn-off on this road. 

The Tea-Pot Road, modestly called by this 
name because of an ancient slop-jar someone 
had humorously hung on a tree. 

The Chimney, a crumbling remnant of an old 
chimney, close to a winding road which cuts 
through an abundant tree farm. 

School Buses. Rusty ruins of these school 
buses formerly used as quarters for deer 
hunters. The antiquated buses are on the bank 
of "Club Lake". Both "Club Lake" and "old 



River Lake" are former channels of the 
Mississippi River. 

Because of an avulsion in the river, the land 
where the Po-Boy Hunting CLub is located is in 
Arkansas and, strangely enough ,one is able to 
pass into Arkansas from Mississippi without 
crossing the river. 

Traveling west, the wanderer will arrive at 
Donelson Point headquarters and, making a left 
turn, he will find Po-Boy Hunting Club coming 
into view. 

After seeing the Mighty Mississippi at Dennis 
Landing, return to Highway 1 by traveling east 
on Bunge Elevator road. At this point, continue 
north about a mile and a half to end the tour. 






.M 



i« •S'-'' 



^ioe\ Morgan 







r^^tT^^ 



agricuH unl e nte y p vis e s 
Capitol HlHsfarms- G R Ravtatcot^ \nc* 



11071 



n 



8CWR0£f_flL0eiRYnfc'N 

W»llor(iR.SQmu.ey*: 
f?oosevfiitOvenne.U 

Paul 2ms\juz\\ 
ClQYtonWest 



The City OF 





R08l^soN-c^RptmtK Fftwiw mm 



wy^mT.Kmo.jR,tviKYoR 

M«.Lup8rCo(fi,Citi^ClerH 

Dear Visitor, 

Stop in Cleveland. 
Our two main Delta high- 
ways, 8 and U. S. 6l, 
intersect here. We have 
several excellent motels, 
a daily paper, and an 
abundance of fine res- 
taurants. 

We are rapidly 
developing as an industrial 
center in agri-business. 
Thousrh our population is 
approaching 20,000, that 
snail town quality of friend- 
liness is everywhere in 
Cleveland-. 

The people here are 
as curious about those from 
other areas as visitor," are 
about riississippians. Spend 
some tine here. Talk to our 
people. Exchange ideas, 
information. 




Charles \^. WVosleV 

CHtEF of pouce 

0. Raq lew\s 

TftX ASSESSOR 

Lav/ell HendriA 

PlRfCToR.fUBHC WORKS 
C\TY mioRMEY 



CLEVELAND 

INDUSTRIE PAR)^ 




P\Rt"lVH:N'5 pWf^K 



OELTA STATE 







rjp-)|— T->n— ^^-T [v-^i'r- 




UL.® 




/M rnf wvtA 



The oldest ones would date back to 1830 
because 1832, after the Treaty of Dancing 
Rabbit Creek, is when the Delta area really 
began to be settled. Only two houses are open 
year round for visitors: 

The Wetherbee House, C 1873, in 

Greenville 

Blantonia, C 1895, in Greenwood. 

When it IS restored enough, the Burrus 
House, C 1859, near Benoit will also be open. 

In the meantime, before more of them are 
open, those interested in the beautiful old 
architectural gems can ride by and look at quite 
a number of them: 

The Webb Home and the Early home on 



Sunflower Avenue in indianola. The Clark home 
on West Side Avenue in Indianola as well as the 
Thompson and Wiggins homes, both on Augus- 
ta in Indianola. 

At Friars Point is the J.D. Robinson home, 
built before the Civil War. 

At Inverness is Oakhurst, C 1904. 

Matagorda (named for a strain of cotton), C 
1840, IS at Jonestown. 

The Cutrer home in Clarksdale is now St. 
Elizabeth's Catholic School. 

On the Egypt Ridge Road, Highway 448 out 
from Benoit, are the Barry home, C 1910; the 
Sutherland home, 1912; the W.A. Speakes 
home, C before the Civil War and the J.R. 



Parkinson home, C before the Civil War. ALong 
Highway 1 between Benoit and Scott is a cabin 
made of hand hewn logs. It is said to be the very 
oldest building standing in the county. 

Other old homes in the Greenville area are 
Wildwood, C 1840; Belmont on Highway 1 
south of Greenville, C 1857; Erwin House on 
Lake Washington, C 1820; Everhope on Lake 
Washington, C 1829; Longwood, Highway 1 
near Glen Allen, C 1832; Mount Holly on Lake 
Washington, C 1855; and Mount Helena, north 
of Rolling Fork on Highway 61, C 1906. 

Many, many beautiful old homes line Grand 
Boulevard and Riverside Drive in Greenwood. 





!S%>-I<i,'»«<\.- .«J^» 



Photos By Minor Gray 



Built by Archibald McGehee, "Elowee" Plantation, Scott, MS 
Great Great Uncle of Mrs. E.H. Winn 





[Continued on next page] 



This page is sponsored by The Valley Bank of Rosedale and 
Cleveland. 



!^Me-:»^^fe^iC^M6'^a^j^&i*r^»s''5»4j^ 




(«''5ii^A*<^"e-?i4^ijC^«e-!%4^^i#r«Me^;*4[^^ 



OLD HOUSES Continued 



(Joocre on c/oar oLua ou/ien cpa lecwe t/)e Deli^a 
/6ut ta/(e aganc/er at 6/?^ o/d houses ^/ru 




J A. Bardwell Sr Home 



Cummings Home 









Going up Broadway 




f^^. 


-^-- 




J f r^ 




^ _ M^,j^ 


m 



R.F. Porker Home 




Colorful Yozoo City Home 



Dr. F.P. Blundell Home 



Mttn II • ' ''I 

Luckett House, home of the Dr. R.J. Moorheods 

[Continued on next page] 



»M«'-iSi4^i#r&«ff'i%4^isr&"e'5i4^i;C^«s-5^,^|^^ 



r?»i;^Mi#?«««s-;*4^>i<^He-:*4^^ 



OLD HOUSES Continued 



VYE DflTA IS mm TJieNA/PmiNG J3RE 



8 at 




/5 Luhert t tit houses aft 





•% s 



^laiH 'III 



iii- an 



The Biddy House 



The W.E. Brown Home 



The Townes House 



The Woltholl-Townes Home 



I U W. a t"-i;i-fi 





..^^^A 



The Whiloker Manse 



The Irby House 



The Botes Home 



White Chimneys 




:Sm^-- 




•^fc/^^ 



The Grantham Home 



The Ike Cohen House 



The Eslelle RoMins Home 



The Lake Crowder Home 






Bowen Ookes 



Elephant Walk, owned by Thomas Peter Darras, M. 



The Yellow Fever Cemetery 



'••e*>4Aft 



^^i«r^M6->ii;^i#r&M6-54i^,i#r^Ms-5^^ijsr^t«s-:%4^ 



©Il^ B^Ha B^mxrirmi'Simes 



Crrcniiilic, ^liseissippi 38701 



:aTroNLi\NT)\f\ sets the record sra\ght _^^1 ^ 



'^iH 




The Indians made so many pots that the 
words "Indian" and "pots" are almost synony- 
mous. It's easy to visualize the Indian in his 
feathers sitting at his potter's wheel throwing 
pots and then pulling them in and out of a huge 
brick and stone kiln with his asbestos gloves on. 
Of course, this is foolishness. The Indian had no 
wheel and no kiln. And Cottonlandia sponsored 
a four day workshop for Girl Scouts to make 
pots exactly as the Indians who made them for 
Cottonlandia did. No gloves, kiln or wheel. 

First, according to Betsy Caldwell, the 
curator of the museum, the young girls went to 
McCarley to collect dried clay. They then slaked 
it down. After the clay slip was free of lumps 
they "wound coils of clay into shapes reminis- 




cent of a bowl. Much smoothing, polishing and 
painting followed". McCarley, a small settle- 
ment close to Greenwood, has good clay pits. 

The next order of business was to make a dirt 
kiln in and on the ground and build a fire in it. 
"Raising the temperature in the primitive kiln", 
continued Miss Caldwell, "caused so much 
popping and sputtering that we feared all the 
pots would be blown to bits. As the embers 
cooled, though, we found that most of the 
vessels had withstood the strain of firing. The 
survivors were placed on display at Cottonlan- 
dia Museum— in Greenwood". 

They are there for you to see. Perhaps your 
own young people could make some pots, too. 
Make inquiries at Cottonlandia. 





COME TO THEDECTR 



THEBOGUERRIBGB 

the fQiuontebri(ioeQftl\e44G'r5 
it UJas uix?rth uwitino for 

YEKGER FARW15 

KlGHWAY4^U .ROUTE l,BonE MS. 

COTTON 
SOYBHF^US 

-RICE 



V»oase C.IS35 

^0\ WALTHftU 
lSQpe»r\ to \J\SlWS 

CE- (S,/^lice Holmes 

m horror ox ynr. 

Holmes' qreat, 
great qrcsridi mother 
mrnet^urcn. 
Theobald^ Ouhose 
fvVst ,husbah(i uuas 
Col.w.w.B\an1i3n, 
ou;iaeY Of Bla^\torMCL 
P\(xr\tation u^here the- 
leuee and GveenviUe^ 

IMirs.iheoUlci.ujho 
q<xoe the knd for 
Ue citu to cjrou; on, 
little hA^hcr if o^anui\|e 

OP^N TaesrSai \o-3 

SPeCTRCULni^ AWTIOVUS 

T0aKS'PH.^55-6c^l5 
QOS6ONWN. -^53 




mm 



'the Qaeen of C\rts 



dioue poe/rb^'"^ eM^ecu^^n^ 



3cj CayicrC TTLocMjaJt* 




SUMMER. SCENE ABOVE WATER 

Traveling westward wistfully 
Gazing at a painted scene 
The sky outlines a mood 
That is very like a dream 

The clouds are ruffled smudges 
Upon a blanket gray 
The birds look singed and hopeless 
As it they've run away. 

The waves below are desperate 
Pushed about by a freezing wind 
They portray my wishing 
To be held by you agam. 

Suddenly a pink bursts through 
Inside out, a silky rabbit's ear, 
It overcomes the darkness 
And gently brings you near. 



FALL WITH YOU 

How much do you love me 
How far is the sky 
When will you touch me 
Does time really fly. 

Clouds are angel kisses 
Spun by frosty gusts 
Summer's fading in pastels 
Replaced by vivid trusts. 

Fall's the time of forming 
Newness— fresh and true 
Of forgetting Time and puzzles 
And living life with you. 



SPRING, THE RAIN IS GONE 

The rain is over and gone 

Never again to be the Tears 

of Anguish of lost years 

But to nourish the birth 

of a world of new mirth 

With flowers of hope to wish on. 

Clouds of smiles we will ride 
Beds of sunlight reside 
Never fearing a shower 
Because we have the power 
To know we can conquer 
Emotions with an anchor 
Of Insight, Beauty, and Dawn 
Look, My Darling, The Ram is Gone! 



WINTER. OVER THE SNOW 

Sleigh ride through life 

Fresh, wild, clean 

Black shining horses of Fate 

Sailing me through in my cold dream. 

Clear sparkling snow 

Whizzes by in all directions 

Grief and sorrow I don't know 

Only Joy and Peace as my reflections. 

The symphony of tinkling bells 
Express more than could be said 
How happy am I here with you 
Upon my own snow sled. 



■ 114, 



\/lSlTORS"V NE\iyCOWlERSOess thr- '—--^ 
'ou must meet some ti|pica.l Ile\ta.ns s 




^k 



\ 



illofihem Want their 
rent ontiine 



THEY FtV. UP \jKe TriU WHe« 




Tll DoLteo UP 



some 

^re sf'RCed ©at 






some «w HhuKY' pp^nkV 



DttT<^^4S V/tlL LEAD 
AiHY BAWt, AWV TIME 



1, 



AND IW'ci'WZ HhPPY WHEN ri W6I1T 



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THEY ST 



~!4 






This page is sponsored by England Motor Company, Greenville, 
Mississippi. Authorized Sales & Service for Ford, Volvo, Mercedes- 
Benz. Phone, 332-6341, Hwy. 82 East. 




C^ (^EAU LO\/ifR OF IVWWKlWD §, PETS 




Miss Mamie Harrell 




Miss Mamie Harreli 



When you pass through Benoit, think of Miss 
Mamie Harreli who lives in a small house there. 
They're grandparents now but the kids of 
yesterday will never forget when Snowball, 
Miss Mamie's pooch, died and she buried him in 
a real casket. 

Jack, another pooch after Snowball, became 
old and blind but still kept his dignity and 
comfort under Miss Mamie's tender care. One 
day she asked her younger brother, Reese, to 
move her sofa to the other side of the living 
room As he finished, he saw Jack come 
strolling into the room, leap into the vacant 
spot where the sofa had been and WHAM— hit 
the wall with tremendous force. 

He laughed so hard Miss Mamie ordered him 
out as soon as he moved the sofa back to its 
original position. And everytime Jack's name is 
mentioned, Reese can't help but laugh again. 




Then there was Dusty, Miss Mamie's old and 
grumbly handyman who did odd jobs around 
the neighborhood. One day he complained to 
Miss Mamie that Doctor had asked him to move 
the children's horse to another pasture. Dusty 
didn't want to do it. It wasn't his |ob to tend to 
the horse. What did Miss Mamie think' Calmly 
and quietly Miss Mamie told him, "Now, Dusty, 
when you need a bandaid on your finger, you 



know who puts it on— Doctor. When you have a 
stomach ache, Doctor gives you medicine. 
When anything's wrong with you, all you do is 
walk in his office and Doctor tends to you— and 
he's never sent you a bill. Yes, you should do 
this favor for Doctor. And when you get that 
horse to the other pasture— before you close 
the gate— you ought to furthermore reach over 
and kiss his butt". 




Rice 

soYBenNS 

corrou 

OV//Vf A-i 



me^cA^ ^<^ 



r-WLim FARMS 

LONesHor 
/yoart- 2 , Box loo, SHRw,fi\ 




y 



Farmer Jones 



III6' 



The Bank o^ ftnoit 

Howe of tho. 8U.Rftas Bouse 



Waltei'Rjt.hiWjpres'i^ervt 



BEMOIT, MISSISSIPPI 





SiTm?«owTOF0oflr 





Acfll 


r ^ 


■ 


-■ ^ 


J 




Lost Ijike 


10 


Acres 


TCH FVSH 

Shurkt-y 


Spanish Fort 


Br 


Ba 










Naarail 






Lmkt or StrMm 


Miln 


C«u-fT 


Town 


Maier Sp 


acict 


Lower Six Mile l^ke 


06O 


Acres 


Lfflore 


Swiftown 


Cr, 


Mr. 






AJbem.rle Uke 


1746 Aires 


Issaquena 


Filler 


Cr. 


Br. 


Ba, 


.Moon I^ke 


3520 


Acres 


Coahoma 


Lula 


Cr. 


Rr 


Ba 


Ca. 


AUhafalayB Lake 


HUU Acie^t 


ll<imi)hreys 


Silvei (.ily 


( r 


Br. 




Mclntyre Luke 


SOO 


Acres 


LeflorB 


Monev 


Br 


Ba 






Bsrtfe Lake 


B(l Acres 


Shurkey 


HollniK Fork 


Br. 


Ba. 




McNutt Lake 


4S0 


Acres 


Leflon- 


Schlater 


Rr 


Bit 






Bear (.reek 


)0 Mile^ 


Humphreys 


Bclzon. 


llr 


Ba. 




Mississippi River 












Hr 


Bu 




Bear I^ke 


2b Acres 


d^uitman 


Marks 


Ci 


Hr. 




Barrow I'lts 






Rivtr Counties 




Cr. 


(a 


Bee I^kt; 


24UO Acres 


llulmes 


Tchula 


Cr. 


Ur. 


Ba 


Mississippi Hiver Chu 


tea 




River C„unlie» 




( >- 


Mr 


Ba. 


Ca. 
















Nine Mile Lake 


160 


Acres 


Sharkev 


Spanish Fort 


Cr. 


Br. 


Ba. 




Beulah I^ke 


16U0 Acres 


Uulivar 


Kosedale 


Cr. 


Br. 


Bu. 


Old Lake 


160 


Acres 


llumphroys 


Belzoni 


Cr. 


Mr 


Ba, 




Bip Mo3sey Lake 
Black Bayuu 


48U Alics 


Leflore 


Muryan City 


Cr 


Br 




Old Orchard Lake 


320 


Acres 


Irffloro 


Creenwood 


Cr 








lb Miles 


Tallahttlchie 


lilcndora 


Cr 


ba 


Ca, 


Otten Lake 


160 


Acres 


I...flore 


Swiftown 


Cr 


Hi 






Blue Lake 


ti40 Acres 


l>ef lore 


Berduir 


Br. 






Panther Cr.-ek 


12 


Miles 


Yaz.... 


Yazoo City 


Rr 








Blue Lake 


HU Acres 


Shmkey 


rtollinif Fork 


Cr, 






Paw I'nw Lake 


120 


Acres 


Warri-n 


Vicksbunr 


Cr. 


Br. 


Ha 


Ca, 


Broad Lake 


200 Acres 


Yazoo " 


' Yazoo City 


Cr. 


Ur 




Phalia Ho^'ue 


40 


Miles 


Washiiifton 


Uland 


Cr. 


Hr 


Ha. 




Cfcle 1-ake 


960 Acres 


Humphreys 


Isola 


Ur 


Ba. 




Pinchback Ijike 


80(1 


Acres 


llolmea 


Crutrer 


Cr, 


Hr 






C&asiiJy Bayou 


60 Miles 
ii40 Acres 


Tullahatchie 
Humphreys 


Webb 
Inverness 


Cr. 
Cr 


Br. 
Ba 


Ba. Ca- 


flackman Bayou 


2 


Miles 
Mi lea 


Sharkey 
'" "l.VfTore 


Ank'uilla 
Money 


Cr, 
Cr. 


Hr 
Ba 






(.^harliewon I<ake 


Robinson Bayuu 


_ ^ 


















Roebuck Lake 


1920 


Acres 


Leflore 


Itta Bina 


( 'r. 








ChoUrd [^ke 


Itf:iO Acres 


lasaiiuena 


hitler 


Cr 


Mr 


Ba 


Shjpwith Crevasse 
Six mile Uke 


200 


Acres 


Ia3a,|u..i,a 


Mayersville 


Cr 


Ua 






Clarkv Luke 


4 Acres 


Sharkey 


Spanish Fori 


Hr 




Hu 


250 


Acres 


Sharkey 


Spani:,h Fort 




Br 






Dead Man Lake 


160 Acreii 


Humphreya 


Helzoni 


Br 


Br 


Sk^ Lake 
Stovall Ldke 


80(1 


Acres 


llumiihreya 


Melzoni 


Cr. 


Mr 






Democrat Lake 


240 Acres 


Leflore 


Swiftnwn 




Ba 


64 


Acres 


Coahunia 


Friars Point 


,T 


Mr 






beSoto Lakv 


2560 Acres 


Coahoma 


Itene I»ra 


Cr 


Kr 

Hr 








Wa3hiii(rton 












Dollar Laki- 


120 Acres 


Holmes 


Tchula 


' *■ 




St«ele Bayou 


15 


Miles 


Uaa.iue.ia 


(Jen Allan 


Cr 


Hr 


Ha 




Dump l^ki; 


360 Acres 


Yazoo 


SaUrtia 


'"'' 


Ml 




Sunflower River 


62 


Miles 


Sharkey 


An^uillu 


Cr, 


Ha 






BaKle Ukf 


lO.KKO Acres 


Warren 


VirksburK 


Hu 


( a 


Cr Hr 


Swan Lake 


80 


Acres 


Tallahauhie 


Clendora 


Cr, 


Hr 






KerRuson Lake 


4,811(1 Acres 


Wa^ihmKton 


Creenville 


It 


Ur 


Ba 


tchula Uke 


1000 


Acres 


IIohne:> 


Tchula 


Cr 


Ur 






Kiah Uke 


;i Acres 


Sharkey 


Spanish Fort 


llr 


Ma 




ten Mile Uke 


"lOil 


Acres 


Sharkey 


Sjianish Fori 


( r 








Five Mile I^ke 


960 Acres 


Humphreys 


Louise 


'■' 


Hr 


Mil. 


Townsend Uke 


a20 


Acres 


Honiijhreys 


Melzoni 


Cr 


Rr 


Mu 




Flower I^ke 


64U Acres 


Tunica 


Tunica 


'' 


Hi 


Mil. 


Tunica Cut-off 


6120 


Acres 


Tunica " 


Tunica 


Cr 


Hr 


Ua 




Four Mile Lake 


6411 Acres 


Humphreys 


Melzoni 


< > 


Mr 


Ma 


twin Lakes 


320 


Acres 


Leflore 


Monev 


Ha 








Gar Lake 


240 Acres 


Humphreys 


lU-lzuni 


Hr 


Mu 




IJpper Six Mile Uke 


lOUO 


Acres 


Lefl.ire 


Mon.'V 


Cr 








Ciooden l^ke 


400 Acres 


Humphreys 


Kelzoni 


Cr 


Hr 




Vick Hauff (lid Hiver 


1120 


Acres 


K.sa.|iiina 


Muyersville 


' r 


Mr 


H>i 


I'a 


Grftaay Luke 


;!nO AcrcH 


Tallahatchie 


Tippo 


''r 


Mr 


Hu 


Walker Lake 


6U0 


Acres 


Leflore 


Swift. .wn 


Hr 








Gunn Bayuu 


KIMI Acres 


Humphreys 


Belzoni 


'' 


Hr 


Ha 


Walnut Luke 


;iii 


Acrei. 


Tallahatrhie 


Churleih.n 


1 t 


Mr 


Ur 




Hamptun I^ke 


50 Acres 


Tallahatchie 


(;irn<l(>ra 


Cr 


Hr 


Mu 


Wahhin^ton Uke 


6.41)1) 


A.res 


W«=hiiik^on 


(Jen Allan 


1 r 


Mr 


Ha 


1 a 


Hor«cah..o [jike 


2560 Acres 


Htilmes 


T. hula 


Cr 


Mr 




WashiiitftoM Hiiyou 


:i 


Miles 


l-HHiioena 


Clen Allan 


(*r 


Hr 


Ci> 




Jackaon Lake 


HOO Acres 


Wu^,hln^cto^ 


CN-n Allan 


Hr 


Ma 




Wa<ip Uke 


161)1) 


Ac^c^ 


Honii.hreyi. 


Melzoni 


I'r 


Hr 


H:> 




kilby Uke 


6411 Acres 


Hun phreys 


Sliver City 


''■ 


Ml 


Ha 


White Uke 


:iu 


Acres 


Tallahat.hie 


Hrazill 


Cr 


Hr 


H.i 


< B 


Lce 


4,:i2U Acre-1 


Wa.-.hLMKlon 


(;reenville 


Cr 


Mr 


Hu (a 


Whiltinntnn Uke 


256(1 


Acres 


llolivar 


M.-noil 


Cr 


Mr 


Hii 




LoKKer I-ake 


4»0 Acres 


Humi.hreys 


Silver (Ily 


Cr 


Hr 


Mil 


Wolf Ijike 


32111. 


Acre-. 


Honi|.hrey« 


Vazon Cily 


Cr 


Hr 


Mn 




Little Favle Luke 


610 Acres 


Humphreys 


Helzoni 


''>■ 


Hr 


Mil 


Yaso.. 1 uke 


lOii 


A. rrs 


Warnn 


Vi.ksl.iirK' 


( r 


Hr 


Ku 


1 a 


Little Moa^y Ijike 
Little Huun.l I^ke 


:i2n Acres 
Mill Acres 


Leflore 
l^^fli.re 


Swiftown 
Siilon 


It 






maRTFsv mi?i rounr il 


nm MISSISSIPPI GRiVlE(S> FISH 


COmrr},\H0Yi 


Little Sunflower K 


ver 14 Miles 


Sharkey 


Spanish Kort 


'> 


Mr 


Ml. 

































Shut UPi 

SoWe^odu's hatching 

^ us 



I have some good news and some bad news 
for birders. First the good— the entire Mississi- 
ppi Delta m the middle of the Mississippi Flyway 
is excellent for birding due to its proximity to 
the Mississippi River and Its climatic changes 
going from extreme heat to extreme cold. 

In Washington County (the good news 
continues) you have four good places to bird in 
a car: 1) LEROY PERCY STATE PARK on 
Highway 12 west of Hollandale. 2) A few miles 
west of Percy Park is the YAZOO NATIONAL 
WILDLIFE REFUGE, several miles south of the 
junction of Highways 12 and 1. A bird list and 
map of the rea is available from the Refuge 
office. 3) WARFIELD POINT PARK on the 
Mississippi River is a beautiful place to bird 
and is easily accessible. The park is three or 
four miles west of Greenville on Highway 82. 



There is a sign on the north side of 82. 4) The 
MISSISSIPPI RIVER LEVEE top can be ridden in 
a car. Go on the ramps or roads leading to 
wooded areas bordering the levee but do not 
attempt to drive in a car through the woods. 

In Bolivar County, the levee continues. Also, 
UNCLE JOE'S LANDING (described in Early 
Ewing's "River Views") is a good spot. South of 
Scott, Ms., turn on the first blacktop road going 
west off Highway 1. The blacktop road will take 
you through the Delta & Pine Land cattle ranch 
on to a gravel road over the levee to a ramp 
leading to the graveled landing. 

The FISH AND MINNOW FARMS (numerous 
over the Delta) and the flooded rice and bean 
fields in the winter are good for observing water 
fowl and shore birds. Another good place in 
Bolivar County is the HUNTINGTON POINT 



^o-t nearly /oo years, /our 
qthtrcttcons of moorts hau(- 
-'o ufn e i and fa nntd 

BALLftRB PIWITKTION 

slartin<) out in (?8;o OS a. 

1 6,0 acre, pi ace, li- 15 r4Li^/• 
a. 2.0,000 A. o^erti.t ion 

iMii/cQvn Oallard 3oj(j L-t to 
L^bJis uJaisom-forfsoQ. 
Watson (efid b his 
daughter, Em^ii'h^ Moore. 

CQpt.bU-iJU-mDon c/eared 

c/- &) dya/ned iht sujamp 
ani 56arid- addfnq tb d .' 

JANC NXOOUf RArveV 

•COTTOM M^ \C l£ • BEANS • t'\SH 
• ChTrUE • WHlrftT 



HUNTING CLUB where there are deer, wild 
turkey, all kinds of birds, an Indian mound, 
remains of cisterns of a pre-Civll War town, an 
old graveyard and a beautiful view of the river. 
Now the BAD NEWS; Huntington Point is 
private. You'll have to find a member to take 
you there. A four wheel drive is necessary. 

The paradise I bird at is ARCHER ISLAND, 
across from the Marina on Lake Ferguson at 
Greenville. There are 235 species of birds to be 
seen over the entire state of Mississippi. I have 
seen 168 on the island including one Western 
bird never seen by anyone else east of the 
Mississippi. It was recorded, photographed and 
written up. The island is only accessible by 4 
wheel drive at all times of the year. Now for the 
REALLY BAD NEWS: Archer Island is very 
private. The gate is always locked. Admittance 
to non-,members is by invitation only. 



45fei#r«»»«-?%4^fea*?^»««'^*i^fei*^"^'^*^^ 



GfORGe STOCK JRis 

LUiliett piftWTflTWM 




Jo/Tni^a^ Ait£Tic rn UMU Plan^^ion i 



>-4ll9l 



Aur if;* c r s 

L/oLLorehctperniltteci tohuhtiMem but there are. vnahtj 
'tcne coikctiohs for (jou to 5ee Qind study 



'I/' 




II. 



What greater excitement could a man feel 
than to walk through his own field and find an 
arrowhead or an Indian hoe. And he knows that 
they have been untouched and unseen by 
anyone since the ancient people left the Delta. 

T.M. Boschert, landowner and farmer and 
the mayor of Duncan, found so many Indian 
relics in his cotton fields he had to build a small 
building to house them. He has been collecting 
thirty years. 




Although there are "slim pickings" in artifact 
hunting now, Mr. Boschert has had much joy in 
finding and catalogmg the remnants of a 
by-gone civilization. Visitors may see his 
collection by appointment. The relics were 
picked up within a small radius of his home in 
his and neighboring fields. 




This little head presumably came off a piece 
of pottery. Mr. Boschert found it three miles 
west of Duncan near the historic Donelson 
house. Private property. Mr. Boschert explain- 
ed that when muscle shells surround artifacts, 
it means they are not as old as those NOT 
surrounded by the shells. Some of the pottery 
could be as old as 2000 years. 




Mr. Boschert named this the Alley-Oop hoe 
because it is so big. Found three and one half 
miles east of Duncan on Boschert Company 
Plantation. The artifacts were found on the 
surface. Private property. 




This chunky rock was found three and a half 
miles west of Duncan on the T.M. Boschert 
Plantation. It was used in Indian games. 
A perfect specimen. The groove, where the 
rope or string was held, is plainly visible. 




This little slender chisel rock was found on 
Jimmy Dunn's place two miles north of 
Duncan in the vicinity of the Alligator Mounds. 
Indian tools were sharpest and strongest. 
Private property. 




The pestle rock was found on the Hushpuck- 
ena River near Highway 61. Hushpuckena in 
Indian language means "Little Sunflower". 
Another possible meaning is "birds plentiful" or 
"piegon roost", according to E.T. Winston of 
Pontotoc, Mississippi. 



[Continued on next page] 



INDIAN ARTIFACTS Continued 




Mr. Boschert found this piece of a pipe three 
miles west of Duncan near the Donelson 
House. Below is Mr. Boschert with a sword 
found on the battlefield at Chicamauga in 
Georgia. This Civil War relic, in almost mint 
condition, is a favorite of Mr. Boschert's. 




COTTONLANDIA is the LB. JONES/CARRIE 
AVENT MEMORIAL COLLECTION, the W.L. 
CRAIG collection and a mastodon believed to be 
around 10,000 years old. It was found in 
neighboring Carroll County. Admission is one 
dollar. Closed Mondays. 

Another happy hunting ground for artifact 
viewers is the NORTH DELTA MUSEUM on the 
levee at Friars Point. This is another example of 
the work of private citizens. The people 
established the museum themselves and they 
run It. In addition to a vast collection of Indian 
artifacts, there is also a tremendous variety of 
other objects, big and small, on display. A small 
fee for admission. THE MARKS PUBLIC 
LIBRARY in Quitman County shows artifacts. 
Other libraries showing Indian artifacts are at 
GREEMWOOD and INVERNESS. 

At Inverness an unusual museum is FITZ- 
GERALD'S AMERICANA MUSEUM. There is a 
large collection of artifacts here and they can be 
seen by appointment. Inquiries may be made at 
the Inverness Chamber of Commerce. 

The SOUTHERN ARTS AND CRAFTS SHOP 
IN INDIANOLA displays artifacts. 

In downtown Belzoni a visitor may go by 
WESTON CLEANERS and see the collection of 
Bob Evans, owner of the establishment. His 
brother, Jimmie Evans, has collected with him. 

Other Deltans with private collections are: 
Harry R. Boschert, son of T.M. Boschert, who 
lives in Duncan also: Wanda and Cotton Fowler 
of Gunnison; Trustin Hicks, a taxidermist, at 



An extensive collection on display for public 
viewing is the one housed in the museum at the 
Winterville Mounds on Highway 1 near Green- 
ville. 

On the other side of the Delta at Greenwood 
is the largest and best cataloged of all artifact 
collections in the state at Cottonlandia, an 
educational and recreational foundation. For a 
small admission fee, visitors can tour this 
remarkable place— remarkable in that it is 
there because private citizens gave money to 
start it and help maintain it. The curator. Miss 
Betsy Caldwell, has the relics displayed in their 
proper time groups. The complexity of the 
different ages is simplified here to the extent 
that an average person can get an understand- 
ing of the different periods, historically and 
pre-historically speaking. If one is interested in 
the Delta he cannot say he is not interested in 
the Indian culture because the Delta is sitting 
on top of it and that is that. They were the first 
ones here and the real history lies in them, not 
the "old South" which is really an interim. 
However, if one does not have an interest in 
Indian artifascts, they should still go to 
Cottonlandia to meet Mrs. Frank McCormick 
(Peggy) a transplanted Texan who knows more 
about the Delta than any Deltan ever did. She is 
the administrator of Cottonlandia. (more about 
Cottonlandia in the Riding Tours). 

Back to the Indian artifact collections: At 



Shelby; Eli Burgos of Duncan (Mr. Boschert 
said in this collection is a little head off a pot 
that is "different"); Mrs. David Denton of 
Shelby; Mrs. Sam Long of Shelby; the Carnegie 
Library of Clarksdale (open to public); Jack 
Roberts of Tunica; Burt Jaeger of Clarksdale; 
Jimmy Humber of Farrell (wonderful pottery 
collection) and Mrs. J.C. Herbert of Shaw (part 
of her collection is at Winterville Mounds). 
Many of these can be seen by requesting an 
appointment. There is also a North Delta 
Archaeological Society. 




Memphis, TN. 



r 



OF 



7^e £/}ra^(n5 



RlllF \!!) ipH pu\ww\oN 



an oldk 



©rroi-* p\CI-<B«> INVENTED HBWt 




Pre fab Plantotion Home C 1830 

Francis Griffin, first owner, called his plantation "Refuge" after he 
suffered disappointment in a friend in whom he entrusted his business 
affairs. Members of the Griffin family are buried in an old cemetery on the 
place. Griffin is credited with building the first cotton picker on Refuge. 

The prefabricated home, of a Louisiana farm house design, was 
assembled, then disassembled and shipped by steam boat to its present 
location where it was re-assembled. All this happened in 1830. It is built with 
square nails and the ceilings are 14 feet high. Refuge is the home of the 
Refuge Hunting Club. Wild turkey and deer are about. 



HeR)E'5 V/V\eRE TO F\MO THm miHE 5El.T(\ 




GREENWOODCountry Store Antiques, 
Gene's Antiques, McDonald Antiques, Russell 
Antiques (jewelry specialty). Walker Mclntyre's. 

GUNNISON-Lettwich Antiques & Museum 

INDIANOLA-Antlque Mall (lunch by appt.), 
Jamieson Antiques 

INVERNESS-F.S. Fitzgerald Museum, James 
Reed Antique Car Collection, Pritchard's 

ITTA BENA-Ad Mixture 

LAMBERT-Agnes' Antiques & Furniture 

LELAND-Cedar Hill Antiques 

NITTA YUMA-Phelps' Nitta Yuma Antiques 

ROLLING FORK-Creel's Antiques 

ROSEDALE & MALVINA-Moore's, Iyer's An- 
tiques, Old & New World Gifts & Flowers 

TCHULA-Lola Flowers Antiques, Taylor Auc- 
tion Exchange 

TUNICA-The Upstairs (needlepoint for anti- 
ques) 



BELZONI-Furniture Forum, Auction Mon. 
nights 

CLARKSDALE & LYON-The Antique Nook, 
Neal's Antiques, Captain Kidd's Treasure 
House, Spivey's Fine Reproductions, Knit Inn 
(needlepoint for antiques) 

CLEVELAND, BOYLE & SKENE-Aunt Idie 
Antique Shop, Alston's Antiques, Clemmie's 
Fireside Shop, Jennings Antique Barn & 
Cabinet Shop, L&A Furniture. Showcase Spec- 
tacular, Inc., Rob's, fine reproductions (lunch 
by appt). Triple C. J.W. Howorth's Art Studjo. 

DREW-Sklar's 

DUNCAN-Hardin's Antiques 

FRIARS POINT-The Ice House 

GREENVILLE-Kathy's Antiques, Lina's, Red 
House Antiques, Jordan Carpet & Decorating, 
Town & Country Barn, Wilson's Junktique, 
Jones & Thackston 



I 



c^-^Cp crrir^. 

















i he Qife ,8 13 Jefte rson Soeet . ja£K6on, \^&, 

cteed' 

"^ ou;n€i 



'Q Dy!\bii^naiSoc.^Coi.I)avioe£OF MS. 



Comop^^c r^ents Of 

ALLEMDME PLi\H11N.& CO- 



$OME DaTAM?ARejUlST5TKB\6H7 PfOPiE 
v>/Ho CftatHk-copsDUnwG 

PHY THem Bills OM T\N\E,Ero/ 




KiO 



e r 



f^auY CWlMQr^Jft. 



One of the Delta's most thrilling sights is to 
stand on the bank of the Mississippi and see the 
river roll by. It's breathtaking in size and 
power. At the same time it's serene. Except for 
a few spots, it is difficult to reach. Yet, with a 
combination of commercial barge traffic, plea- 
sure boats, dredges and fishermen, it's quite a 
lively place. I can't guarantee that you will see 
any of these every time you go, but you should 
see most in a relatively few visits. Every time 
you go it will be beautiful and different from the 
last time. Now, a few words about vantage 
points on the east bank. 

AT VICKSBURG there are not many good 
spots because the river doesn't flow in front of 
the city. It can be seen from several Vicksburg 
National Military Park lookouts but these are 
high above the river and the view is distant. 

There are BRIDGES AT VICKSBURG, 
GREENVILLE, HELENAand MEMPHIS, but you 
can't stop on the bridges and the view is often 
interrupted by railings, traffic, etc. 

GREENVILLE, MISSISSIPPI has WARFIELD 
POINT PARK. It features a fine location at the 



\ie\/^ 



junction of the river and the Greenville harbor 
with a lookout tower, campsites and picnic 
tables on the river. 

Farther north at SCOTT, MISSISSIPPI there's 
UNCLE JOE'S LANDING or, as it's often called, 
RIVERSIDE PARK. This is undeveloped except 
for picnic tables provided by the Boy Scouts. 
You can go right to the edge of the water and 
the channel is near the shore, so the river 
traffic is close at hand. This is also the spot 
where the levee broke in 1927 to cause the 
worst flood in the Delta's history. Near here 
was the landing of the Arkansas City ferry. It 
takes Its name from Joe Collins, a commercial 
fisherman, who once moored his houseboat 
nearby. 

UNCLE JOE'S LANDING is reached by taking 
the first blacktop road one-fourth mile below 
Scott and Lake Bolivar. Turning on to the 
blacktop road off Highway 1, go west about one 
mile and the park is just across the levee. This 
spot is private property and hunting or camping 
is strictly prohibited. 

ROSEDALE, MISSISSIPPI has two access 




PICNIC TftBlf AT UIVCtE lm lABPlW 



points. North of town is TERRENNE LANDING 
which is merely an access to the river banks. 
Just south of town there is the GREAT RIVER 
ROAD STATE PARK with an observation tower, 
campsites, and, at low water, a sandbar which 
is not easily reached at other places. 

Below CLARKSDALE there is another access 
at FRANCES and one at HURRICANE POINT 
near PERTHSHIRE which is about five miles 
west of Highway 1. 

In the south Delta in Issaquena County (until 
recently the only county without an incorporat- 
ed town) at MAYERSVILLE (it became incorpo- 
rated in 1978) you can see the river after you 
walk over the levee. 

One word of caution— LOOK BUT DO NOT 
LEAP, Do not swim in the Mississippi River. It is 
dangerous and many good swimmers have 
drowned in it. 

For more information write EARLY C. 
EWING, JR , SCOTT, MISS. 38772 for a brief 
booklet entitled "Geology of the Yazoo Mississ- 
ippi Delta". Local bookstores and libraries have 
a good selection on the Mississippi River and 
the 1927 flood, one of this country's greatest 
natural disasters. 



MvlOHNRatlMWW FARM 

ROseDflLe,iwv<,sissipp\ 
COTTON 

Bb-EF CATTLE ^""^ 

US Pnnw-J.w. »(x\inicuir$tP.PoTTs itjs'i 
LEVEE rREflSURER - BJMrtftRTtN iet»<l| 

JoV»if\ Rucl TurvT€,r came to 
tAeOelta as ayouMc^ wcun from 
Calhoun Count«j,Mis5iss»ppi»» i<?5i 
He built up and \wprove4 iha- 
tiaind into apYodvxdvue farm. 
IT \s owwed by his heirs : 

lW/^5, J. R.TURNER 
a Of Ue TURMEll 



c-&Me'-v5^^foi#r^Me'^s4^&i<^«»e"">s^^j&is?^ 



JOHN s.TunweR 

JAW R,.TUf^WfR 
J/»Nfc-TURr»fR BROWeR 




WALfOTT PLANTATION 




H en n eth OUalco(t,?r. (third from left) as ci ') 
boy in ditypicdd Pclf4-S<:en?of CdWjr \'\00's 1 



-124< 




Trie IIP OF THE iCt'BERG 



CALENDAR 



MARCH 

Carrollton Pilgrimage 

APRIL 
GREENWOOD Arts Festival-4 days 
MOORHEAD-Yellow Dog Arts & Crafts Fair 
BELZONI-World Catfish Festival 
CLEVELAND-Crosstie Festival 

MAY 
GREENVILLE-Courthouse Lawn Arts & Crafts 
CLEVELAND-Delta Council Day 

JUNE 
ROSEDALE-Homemakers Club Arts & Crafts 
BATESVILLE-Arts& Crafts 
JULY 
GREENVILLE-Three day 4th of July Festival 
GREENVILLE-Horseshow last Fri. & Sat. 

AUGUST 
YAZOO CITY-10 miles north on 49-Mud Derby 

SEPTEMBER 
PARCHMAN-Annual Rodeo every Sun. aft. 
CLARKSDALE-St. Elizabeth Catholic Fair, 2nd 
Tuesday, Jones Activity Center for Senior 
Citizens Bazaar. 
INDIANOLA-lndian Bayou Arts & Crafts 
GREENWOOD-Expo 1850, Cottonlandia & 
Florewfood, several days 
OCTOBER 

CLARKSDALE-Sunflovifer River Bank Art Show. 
Jewish Women's Antique Show. 
NOVEMBER 
GREENVILLE-Greenville Garden Club's Anti- 
que Show. Bazaars & Bake sales every- 
j where, 

DECEMBER 
GREENWOOD-Delta Band Festival & Winter 

Carnival, 2nd Fri. after Thanksgiving 
GREENVILLE-Xmas Parade. 1st Saturday after 

Thanksgiving 
CLARKSDALE-Xmas Parade, second Tuesday 
after Thanksgiving Clarksdale Choral 
Society Annual "Messiah". 
LELANDSecond, third & fourth weeks Xmas 
floats in Deer Creek; prettier at night. 



Of Delta happEn\n5S 



b*^fvanU\e IcKLuler 




INVERNESS-Xmas Eve, "Luminaries on the 
Bayou", night viewing. 

CLEVELAND-Xmas Parade 

SPRING THROUGH FALL 

BELZONI-The Wister Gardens 

SEASONAL [Consult local news media] 

SPORT EVENTSDelta State University, Cleve- 
land. Miss. Delta Jr. College, Moorhead. 
Miss. Valley State College, Itta Bena. 
Holmes County Jr. College, Godman. 






LITTLE THEATER-Clarksdale, Greenville, 

Greenwood, Cleveland. 
COMMUNITY CONCERTS-Clarksdale, Green- 
ville, Greenwood. 
SYMPHONY-Greenville, three annually 
CONCERTS & ART EXHIBITS-Delta State Univ. 
CHURCH WOMEN'S BAZAARS & BAKE SALES- 

in every town. 

YEAR ROUND 
GREENWOOD-Blantonia House, Cottonlandia, 

Florewood, Fort Pemberton 
GREENVILLE-Wetherbee House, Winterville 

Mounds & Museum. 
CARROLTON-Some Pilgrimage homes open 

year round 
FRIARS POINT-Museum 

CAMPIN & OUTDOOR WITH HOOKUPS 
GREENVILLE-Warfield Point Park 
ROSEDALE-Great River Road State Park; 

hookups by Fall 1979. 
GLEN ALLEN-Paul Love Park 
HOLLANDALE-Leroy Percy State Park 
SHARKEY COUNTY-Delta National Forest 
VICINITY OF GRACE & GLEN ALLEN, E OF 

HWY. 1-Yazoo National Wildlife Refuge 
LAKE LEE OFF HWY. 1, S. OF GREENVILLE- 

Deerfield Park 
LELAND-Leland Recreational Park 
DURANT-Holmes County State Park 






(;at£TmCrS /. 



v«<5-'/Ta^ 



/VELCOKiey^SiToRS.To THE 
VlissUsippiPelta a^k I'd the 
State's ^reoTest C«a.nry'BOUV/iR 




*-*\7b* 



W 'A- ^X- W W W W W W W 'X' W 'X' 'X* W w w w w W W W W 'JL' W fi* W W w w w w w W w w W W W W W fll 19 







mam/JaJ/en- and Jh>7ic/'iL ^-^ ^6:>c^ 



Some are for real dining. Some are for a 
hamburger, pizza or a to-go. paper-wrapped 
deal. Some member of the staff has listed each 
place. The staff Is a pretty healthy looking 
outfit. 

HOLLYWOOD 
The Hollywood- lovely old tavern steaks, live 
music 

TUNICA 
Blue & White Cafe-great vegetables 
Delta Cotton-steams and seafood; Owens 
Grocery-hungry folks welcome 

DUNCAN 
Booga Bottom Store-very casual 

CLARKSDALE 
Delta Warehouse-famous salad bar; The Den- 
homemade hot biscuits; Kirn's Restaurant- 
authentic Chinese dishes; Polles-oysters, 
steaks; Picnic-er-plantation fried chicken; 
Ponderosa-western decor, catfish, steaks; Rest 
Haven-fresh pies, cabbage rolls; Regency-home 
cooked meals; Rudan Lanes-homemade pies, 
bowling; Abe's Barbecue-fantastic barbecue; 
Ranchero-ribs. gumbo, barbecue; Kathryn's 
Restaurant-steaks, seafood, need reservations 

ROSEDALE 
Cobbs Restaurant-short orders, onion rings; 
Cotton Boll-tasty, quick burgers 

DREW 
Main Street Cafe-good lunches 
CLEVEUND 
Sharp Street Station-great fish, steaks, band at 
night; Dino's-good substantial lunches; 
Michael's steaks, seafood; Pasqualesgood 
pizza; Wendy's-good hamburgers, frostie; 
Sonic-chill pie delicious 



SHAW 
Dinty Moore's Shady Nook-quaint, homecooked 
meals, has dozens of pictures of Miss Americas 

INDIANOU 
The Crown in the Antique Mall-gourmet menu, 
changes daily; Pea Soup's Lotaburger-good 
burger, best fried shrimp & oysters; Sonic-chili 
pie delicious 

BOYLE 
Sweet Olive-beautiful decor, quiche, omelettes, 
parfaits; Bogart's Oyster Bar-(1979) 

GREENWOOD 
Lusco's-an institution of the Delta, wonderful 
food; Ella's for Health-tasty health food; The 
Loft-gumbo, stuffed tomatoes, beef; Malouf's 
Delicatessan-New Orleans sandwiches; Rlcky's- 
romantic 

MOORHEAD 
Irene's Grill-good hamburgers 

INVERNESS 
B&G Bar-be-que-unusual and good; Southern 
Fried Chicken-very enjoyable 

LELAND 
Lillo's-great pompano salads and lasagna; 
Pagoda-very good Chinese and American dish- 
es, beef en brochete; Farmer's Dairy Bar-good 
icecream; Hitchcock's Dairy Freeze-good malts 

TRIBBETT 
Tribbett Grocery-beer and tidbits, bery interes- 
ting 

GREENVILLE 
Cowpen (across bridge)-great Mexican food, 
steams; Ventura'svery good Italian food; How 
Joy's-delicious Chinese food; Venetian-specta- 
cular spaghetti; Marina-seafood specialties; 



I 

Doe's Eat Place-unique, great steaks, tamales,| 
salad; McDonald's-good hamburgers;' 

Morrison's Cafeteria-good vegetables; Alamatt-! 
everything good, serves breakfast early;; 
Buehler's Ky. Fr. Chick, good chicken; Captain 
D's Seafood-fried seafood; Shoney's-burgers;; 
Western Sizzler good beef; 1 Block East-ham i 
burgers, live music; Jim's Cafe-remodeled, 
good lunches; Bonanza-good beef; Delta 
Landing great; Holiday Inn Restaurant-very 
enioyable; Wendy's-good hamburgers; 
Sambo's-wonderful; Pizza Hutgood pizza; 
Pasqualesgood Italian sandwiches; 

HOLLANDALE 
Cotton Pickin Place-great lunches; PJ's Dairy 
Bar-chicken; Hamburgers, Inc. -"the" hambur- 
ger in Hollandale; Scottie's Shoppe-sandwich- 
es. 

BELZONI 

Pigstand-wonderful barb-cue; Buckwheats- 
great steaks; Belzoni Dairy Bar-very good 
lunches & hamburgers; Sonic-speedy sandwich- 
es; Clint's-quick snacks 

ANGUILLA 
Dairy Bar-good ice cream 

ROLLING FORK 
Chuck's Dairy Bar-burgers & malts; Plantation 
View-lunches 

GRENADA 
The Darras Restaurant-fine dining, "reasona- 
ble" 




lO" 



BLlLELLKpLflNTAnoN 



-^ 



>f 




J)^ Jl^ J>^ -0-. -ft. -0- -<- -<- fit-, i-O-i f.O-1 ffrii r$-i rt-i r?-i rfrti nt-t 



J 



■BU.1LT BYOVfRBY FAMILY IN l88O's.0\Vl\«eD 
L/^Tb'R BY ROBERT IWOifLfY IN fflaVWo'S. 
REM(V/iT!OM IN \m & 1^78 BY THE BOB NUNNERY5 

py«S«ht ovV^«»'S 



wl 



^m^^^^ 



j^^^S^m^^i^^^ 





MeUe Paune l> LundaLee Stock ha\Je roanded them up- 



m 






%m^ 



k 



Lost: Reward for information leading to return of 
Golden Retriever, about 2 yrs. old. answers to the 
nome of Nemo. Lost in Avery St. area Coll 
B43-4214 or 843-4055. John Word, Jr. 




Mimi with her owner, Mrs. Sidney Gullett. 




Mr, Harvey owned by Mock Dyess. 




Pug. beloved pet of Miss Momie Horrell A 
memorial. 



r» 








«•«*' 



4k-^ 




Baby Sister & owner Curtis Boschert. 




In memonam Popcorn (ormer pel of Becky 
Hartell 



(Continued on next page] 



^^k^^'^t^k'^^^^t^^^^t^Mh^^^^f^^^mk^^^ 



PETS Continued 



l£- 







H ^ 




m- 




\^^^W -^ 



*f« 



tn memoriam, "Teamster Dawson", pet of 
Fountain Dawsons 12 years. 



Miss Darling with Julia Trigg Speokes. 






Georgia owned by Gene Gonier. 



Coco with Lillian Williams up. 



PLANNING AN AUCTION? 

YOKLEY & LUNDY AUCTION CO. has for 
years been conducting highly successful equip- 
ment sales all over the South Central United 
States. 

Backed by our years of auction experience, know- 
ledge of current market values, modern advertis- 
ing methods, competent and experienced person- 
nel, we are able to assure you a successful and 
profitable auction. 

Some situations that lend themselves particularly 
well to the area of our proficiency are: 

• Equipment dispersions in estate settlements; 

• Complete or partial business liquidations'; 

• Sales in foreclosures or bankruptcies; 

• Equipment sales in leases or sales of farms; 

• Inventory reductions or equipment updating 
sales; 

• Accurate appraisals for banks, PCA's, attor- 
neys, or individuals— for reasonable fees. 

Our sales are well planned, executed in a highly 
capable way, commissions reasonable, settlements 
prompt and our financial stability unquestioned. 
Our bank reference is Guaranty Bank & Trust 
Co., Belzoni, Miss., Mr. Paul Townsend, Jr., Pres. 

We invite your inquiries and will be glad to dis- 
cuss with you, at your convenience and confi- 
dentially, how we may be able to serve you. We 
are now booking sales for this fall and winter and 
can reserve an ideal date for your sale. 

YOKLEY & LUNDY 
AUCTION CO. 

IBox 577~Tel. 601-1-247-3292 or 
247-1641 
Belzoni, Mississippi 39038 

Pete Yokley, Auctioneer 
Drue Lundy, Sale Manager 
Buster Dilley, Sales Rep. 



TWIN 




Z^m(^e^J^>^Mcia.?^{bny 



'■"■'■ i %'% > 



HOLLANDALE, MISSISSIPPI 38748 



OUR POWER IS your strength 



P O BOX 15B 

TELEPHONE 927-2as2 

BRANCH OFFICES 

BELZONI AND ROLLING FORK 



[Continued on next page] 



'^M^i^!iilr^^^^#fM^i^i^^^^i^#f<^k^^ 



PETS Continued 




Melanie Dakin's Kitty 



Weegie owned by Gene Gonier 







FRAME SHOP 

Orioiioai Del-fcv 

ART^ PRINTS 
-ei F TS- 

c\ slAort tpip" 

fromanyiAykiere \y\ 
d\^e delta 



CXUMIV\tMe5 

PO BOX 205 
108 Hayden ST ^^^ 

BfLZOKll ,M15S.>^ "" 

-3Q0 3e) PHo 




Mil 



We haven't ha4Qllnin<j to uuare bat hardujare - Since \?>8^ 



C« ■ QUALITY - V^kHJK 



Qentry 

^ HARDWARE -^ 





WELCOME TO THE DEUTA 



HENDERSON S BAIRD HARDWARE COMPANY 

l^a CORPORATE!) 

Gree/Awooci.tVlississi ppi 



38^30 



[Continued on next page] 



'kf^r^i^^^'^»hs^i^^^^^^^^MM!sm!^^^^S^^Mm 



PETS Continued 





Sunshine Wiggins 



Charlie Jacobs and "pet" turkey. 




Covered! 



itMCl^v^dnd 



Pontiac, Bukk.Cadillac, ieep and CMC Trucks 



■*«•' 





^ 


, 




In memoriom, PRINCE, owned by Joe Weilenman 


tomiiy. 


"■■■■^^ iJMfc. ^''■■>^'l||lij|^ 




m.^ 


-."♦f |» ^flyf c # 








} 


/-' ^*!-. .Jfe*,_ 











1^ 



Sassy, owned by Charlotte Neal. 




^^" ^v«* 



Thumbs, pet of Carol Burge Jones. 



[Continued on next page] 



'dki^^'^^i^^^m^ik^^^^i^^i^^mk'^^'^^^^sdmM^^ 



PETS Continued 





"A silly friend" from Shelby sent him. (Editors 
think he is not real.) 






Doeboy with owner. Lynda Lee Gonier Stock. 




Charles Boyer Nunnery and owner-friend. 



M IW^ SiVllG (Sll\ll§.SHt\v/, M^. Was fifit (jroup to meet otBuLrras Hou6e, c \b5'\ 





5HAv; CIVIC c\m Has picnic WAEefftKi&Tme \»i \ont^ 




NEV6R JUDGE A ^<^<^^ BY \X5 CO\/€fK - - 

6r?eeNVuLfc's most f-kmous 



. srcftKs 
• spflGHerri 
5E/» Food 







PH.334 -3515 



TftKE^oaTSeRv/ice 
« 1 1 dAi) - Hot tan\flJies only 
SERVE- fePlA- r\iy 



[Continued on next page] 






Kkih^'^^i^^s^^^ihj^-'^^i^^^^^^k^^^^^&^'^^k^ 



PETS Continued 




Chip, pet of Mr. and Mrs. Buford Witliamson of 
Leiand. 




Jarrie S her babes on Dry Boyou Pitn. She catches 
rots, snakes, mice ft others. Photographed ft 
owned by Estelle White. 




Sasha Wiggins 




Elizabeth Bossies Ninny-Pooh 



EXCHANGE CiaBof cWeUM.Ms, 



(0 

p 




Doeboy loves life in Delta; owned by George 
Stock 111 




"Miss Vera", pel of Woyne. Suzy, & Doty 
Former-Memorial. 



Wleetings'Tviursdays 

CIEVELAND COUMT«Y CLUfi 






?roc«e<is used foi Commun»tij Sevuice Projects 
PANCAKE BREAK f AST X»/^^S TRCE ^RIES 

YOUTH-OF-MONTH ^WAR'DS YOUT W-OF-YEftR AWARD 

CRIME PReVENTlOW V/EPK eo>( SCOUT TROO P 

PRCSEMTATIOWI Of- TWGEDOM 5HR\NE 



[Continued on next page] 



§^4f^Ayi^h'^^'ikk^^j§^^^ 



limrJi^^Ml^^^mh^i^^^ 



PETS Continued 






Toro, owned by State fans, the Hobson Garys. 



Kitty Black & owner Rosemary Jacobs. 



Dixie, on Arabian colt & owner George Stock III. 





Toshi. typical Delta dog, loves parties: owned by 
Susan Smith, Belzoni, 



. \^M^'i^mMi 



Hugo, the Kodak K-ntne of Greenville Photo 
Supply. Owner: Julian Blokely. 




Mike with Horry McClain Ward III. Toledo. Ohio. 
1949. 



\As W^asiniastryfe 







We'll teep it 



comiJi 





om 



IVIILL SCIPPLIESINC highway ^GREE^Jv,uE,M5. 



[Continued on next page] 



i^^^lSt!i^T,^^^^#f^^!^!l3t^^^^^ 



PETS Continued 




The Bienoime Bo' 
Knowlton Lytle. 




Curtis Boschert is not choking Applesauce. 





Toodle-dee-pie and owner, Lavalle House. 



Claudine Gary's goslins. 



tip T^p flmi %ti © p 

4-^ NUle^e of Beno'a,\Vls. H.fr.M\Us cni S.H-f^i'Us 



W\ ce 
sou bea^s 



sou 



5h 





FOR FUN*. 



CLfflRt'B IN THf CARLY noo'S, 1\9 TOP is 
THE o^dLY PLaNTHTio^^i OF ftN^f S^^f 6C-TVv/eevi 
Clear CReev^ and 80&ue PuRLifl LY(N& imorth 
Of THE LITTOW ROftD WH\CVA Vs/AS CU'RHeD PRIOR 
TO i<\i8,lWD£lT£\fRS^lOM, BeCRUSE IT WAS 

LOW AWD wer.JTWfis hawihd Tip Top 



Trouble m Cotton, Rice or BeansV I 

WeCoihEnciituuith ^av 

FLYING iVlACHlNGS 

BOYLE FLYIN& SERVICE 

BOVV_E,MlSSlSSlPPl 
phones: ^^5-« ^50 8^3-^^ I 
8^3 '=i:>'^1 




Compiled By: VIRGINIA HATCHER 



With: BETTY JEAN CONGER, AGNES BARRY, VIVA LEA MclNNIS 



Jackie Onassis and the Kennedy clan, the 
scandals of the political administrations, As the 
World Turns, places to go and see— all make 
good reading and viewing, but nothing makes 
the eyes light up like a recipe. And these are 
good ones, from heart-of-gold gals, each of 
whom donated not only her recipe but five 
bucks toward the cost of production!! 



Bread 




KATE ROTCHILD'S 
SOUR CREAM RAISIN MUFFINS 

1% C flour 

1 Teaspoon baking powder 
'/2 Teaspoon salt 

Vi Teaspoon soda 

2 Tablespoons sugar 
1/3 C raisins 

1 C sour cream 
1 Egg beaten 

Sift together flour, baking powder, salt, soda 
and sugar. Stir in raisins. Combine sour cream 
and eggs and add to flour mixture. Mix until dry 
ingredients are moistened. Fill greased muffin 
pans 2/3 full. Bake in 400 degree oven 20 to 25 
minutes. 

(Light, tasty and a hit on any morning but 
Sunday especially!) 

CHEESE STRAWS 

by Virginia Hatcher 

1 pound sharp cheese 
Vi pound butter 

3 cups sifted flour 
1 teaspoon salt 

Vi teaspoon red pepper 

Mix thoroughly and put through cookie press 
on greased cookie sheet. Bake 'til crisp. 
MONKEY BREAD 

by Cornelia Wood 

1 package Pillsbury's Hot Roll Mix 

1 stick butter 

1 egg (Direction on mix call for it) 

Flour to roll out dough 

Greased pan. A bundt tube pan is fine. 

Prepare the roll mix according to directions 
on the box, letting dough rise and then rolling it 
out to a thickness of '/? inch or less. Cut the 
rolled out dough into wedges about 2 or 3 
inches long. Dip each wedge in melted (but not 
hot) butter and pile them on each other in the 
greased bundt pan. Let the wedges rise 
covered in a warm place for an hour or so and 
then bake in a 450 oven til brown. Turn out of 
pan as you would a cake. Serve hot. Do not 
slice. Just peel off pieces. And if you'd just as 
soon be killed as a sheep as a lamb, then bring 



out some more butter for the hot bread. 

If you're a roll maker, use your recipe instead 
of the mix. (Would you rather have a luscious 
coffee cake? Then sprinkle cinnamon and sugar 
over the buttered wedges before putting them 
in pan to rise. Glaze the finished product with a 
powdered sugar frosting.) 

HUSHPUPPIES 

Selected 

2 C fine corn meal, sifted 

2 T baking powder 
1 1 salt 

1 C finely chopped onion 
l'/4 C milk 
% C water. 

Mix together the cornmeal, baking powder, 
and salt. Blend in the onion. Mix milk and water 
and stir into cornmeal mixture until well 
blended. It may be necessary to add more 
cornmeal so that the mixture is stiff enough to 
be shaped into small cakes. Fry in deep fat, 360 
degrees, until browned on all sides. For best 
flavor, the cornmeal batter should be cooked in 
the same fat in which the fish is fried. 
WAFFLES 

Selected 

3 C flour 

4 level teaspoons baking powder 
Vi t salt 

yolks of four eggs 

2C milk 

% pound melted butter or oleo 

Whites of four eggs, beaten dry 

Sift the dry ingredients together three times. 
Beat yolks of eggs, add butter and milk and stir 
into the dry ingredients. Add whites of eggs. 
Bake on a hot, well buttered waffle iron. When 
one side is well browned, turn the iron to brown 
the other side. If you have an electric waffle iron 
you do not have to do any turning. 
ANGEL BISCUITS 

1 cake or packet of yeast Selected 

2 T lukewarm water 

1 C shortening 

5 C plain flour 

3/4 t baking powder 
1/4 C sugar 
1 1 soda 

2 C buttermilk 

Dissolve yeast according to package direc- 
tions. Sift flour into large bowl. Add yeast 
mixture. Add remaining dry ingredients, short- 
ening and enough buttermilk to make a firm 
dough. 

Refrigerate until needed. Roll dough to Vi 
inch thickness. Cut with biscuit cutter. Place on 
greased baking sheet. Bake at 450° until 
brown. Cover remaining dough and refrigerate 



until needed. 

SPOON BREAD [or baked grits] 

Betsy Winn 

1 C salted cooked grits 

'/? stick butter or oleo added to and mixed with 

hot grits 
1 C milk added to hot grits (cold milk will cool 

the mixture) 
Add two beaten eggs to the cooled mixture and 
beat well. Bake in a casserole dish until brown 
at 400 degrees. Get it brown. Add less milk if 
it's too "soupy". 

(If you have this, there's no need to fix potatoes. 
A note to the inexperienced cook: a mixture 
should not be hot when you add raw eggs 
because (if it's hot) it will cook the eggs). 




Cakes & Cookies 



AMBROSIA CAKE 



Mrs. Roy Foster 

(This ambrosia cake has probably already made 
her famous, but Mrs. Foster's claim to fame in 
these parts is that she's Lynda Lee Ganier 
Stock's grandmother. Lynda Lee is the manag- 
ing editor of the Tour Guide) 
2'/2 C sifted cake flour 

2 t. baking powder 
'A t salt 

2/3 C shortening 
Vh C sugar 

3 eggs 

5 T orange juice 

2 T lemon juice 

2 T water 

grated rind of 1 lemon and 1 orange 

Sift flour and measure; add baking powder 
and salt and sift 3 times. Add lemon and orange 
rind to shortening and cream thoroughly. Add 
sugar gradually and cream well. Add eggs one 
at a time and beat for 1 minute each time. Add 
flour and juice alternately and beat until 
smooth after each addition. Bake at 375. 

Spread following filling between layers and 
spread white icing over entire cake. Sprinkle 
coconut over top. 
Orange-Coconut filling 
3'/2 T flour 
1 C sugar 

[Continued on next page] 



135r 



RECIPES Continued 

V2 C orange juice 

2 T butter 
Vi C coconut 

1 egg slightly beaten 
grated rind of 1 orange 

3 T lemon )uice 

2 T water 

Combine flour, sugar, rind, juice, water, egg, 
and butter. Cook In double boiler ten minutes 
or until tfilck. Stir constantly— add coconut. 
Cool before spreading between layers. 
White Icing 

V/2 C granulated sugar 
'A t cream tartar 
1/8 to V, t salt 
Vs C egg wfiites 

1 T white Karo 
5 T water 

2 t vanilla 

Mix all ingredients in top of double boiler. 
Begin with 1/8 teaspoon salt. Place over boiling 
water and beat with electric mixer on medium 
speed for 8 minutes. Remove from fire and 
continue to beat 2 or 3 minutes. Add vanilla and 
more salt If needed. Set aside until almost cool 
and beat well. 

APRICOT STRUDEL 

Kate Daniel 

(Kate Is from Scott, the unincorporated com- 
munity of high class folks who run the 38,500 
acre plantation, Delta & Pine Land. Her 
husband, W.J. Daniel, Is president of the huge 
place which produces rice, cotton, soybeans, 
certified seed, and community spirit that 



infects Benolt, five miles north on Highway 1 

and Greenville, 15 miles South on Highway 1. 

An English syndicate owns Delta Pine. Now, 

back to one of the best recipes on the whole 

38,500 acres-THE STRUDEL; 

2 sticks margarine 

8 oz. cream cheese 

2 Cups flour 

Apricot preserves 

Brown Sugar 

Cinnamon 

Chopped Nuts 
STEP 1 Soften margarine and cream cheese. 

Add flour and mix well. Wrap and refrigerate 

overnight. 

ST£P 2. Divide dough into 6 balls. Roll out in 
rectangular shapes. Spread the apricot pre- 
serves on each rolled out rectangular slab. 
Then sprinkle over the apricots the brown 
sugar, cinnamon, and chopped nuts. For each 
slab: Fold one end completely over the other 
end In the center. (You will now have three 
thicknesses and the apricot filling with sugar, 
cinnamon, and nuts will be between each 
thickness.) Bake the 6 Strudels In a 350 oven 
approximately 40 min. or until golden brown. 
This freezes beautifully. (And if you'll serve 
some real coffee Instead of Instant with it, you'll 
always be remembered when the word 
STRUDEL Is mentioned.) 

A WALNUT CAKE 

Selected 

(If you need to do something nice for a friend or 
the family, make them a Walnut Cake. Lots of 
people have never tasted one. If you need to fix 



a basket for the needy, don't put in a sack of 
flour and some corn meal, put in a Walnut Cake. 
They can eat on It for several weeks and, 
wrapped in foil and put in the fridge, no telling 
how long it would stay tasty): 

Work 3 sticks or V/z cups butter until it Is 
creamy and gradually beat in 2 cups sugar until 
the mixture is smooth. Mix In 6 egg yolks, lightly 
beaten. Mix % cup milk with % cup brandy 
and 1 teaspoon vanilla. Sift S'/z cups flour with 
'/2 teaspoon salt. Stir the two mixtures 
alternately Into the egg mixture. Add 1 cups 
coarsely chopped walnuts to the batter. Beat 6 
egg whites until they are foamy, add 1 teaspoon 
cream of tartar, and beat the whites until they 
hold definite peaks. Fold the meringue into the 
batter gently but thoroughly. Pour the mixture 
into a 10-Inch tube pan, oiled, lined with brown 
paper, and oiled again. Bake the cake in a slow 
oven (250 or 275) for 2'/2 to 3 hours, or until it 
tests done. Cool the cake on a wire rack for 
about 30 minutes. Remove It from pan and cool 
the cake completely. Sprinkle the top with 
sifted confectioners' sugar. 

BANANA NUT BREAD 

by Clare Jackson 

1 cup sugar 
'/2 cup Crisco 

Cream the above together 

2 eggs added one at a time and beat well with 

sugar and Crisco 
2 cups flour (measure after sifting) 
1 Teaspoon soda 
pinch of salt 

[Continued on next page] 




FftYE STOVALL 
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RECIPES Continued 

Sift these dry ingredients together 
IV2 cups mashed and peeled bananas 

Add sifted flour, soda & salt to eggs, sugar & 
crisco mixture. Then add bananas slowly and 
mix well. Last, add 1 cup broken nuts. Bake at 
300 degrees (275 for gas oven) very slowly for 
45 minutes to 1 hr. This will fill a large bread 
pan. 

PRUNE CAKE 

byGwin King 

1 cup sugar 

% cup butter (or oleo) 

3 eggs 

3 Tablespoons sour cream 

1 cup buttermilk 

1 Teaspoon Soda 

2 teaspoon cinnamon 
1 teaspoon Allspice 

1 cup stewed prunes 
1 cup nuts 
1 teaspoon vanilla 
V: teaspoon salt 

Cream butter and sugar, add eggs one at the 
time; alternately add buttermilk to which soda 
has been added and the flour to which the 
cinnamon, spice and salt have been added and 
all sifted together. Last, add vanilla, prunes 
and nuts. Bake in layer pans for 40 minutes at 
300 degrees or 350. 
Icing for Prune Cake: 

1 cup sugar 

V2 cup sour cream 

2 eggs 

1 teaspoon vanilla 



2 Tablespoons Butter 

1 cup stoned stewed prunes 

1 cup nuts 

Mix together and cook until thick. Cool, then 
ice cake. Dee-li-cious!! 

CARAMEL ICING 

Selected 

First: Get out a big boiler because this really 
bubbles up. This icing is great and you do not 
have to brown the sugar in a separate vessel. 
You don't have to brown the sugar at ail. 

2 sugar 
1 C butter 

1 C buttermilk 
V2 teaspoon soda 
V2 teaspoon vanilla 

Mix all ingredients except vanilla. When it 
forms a soft ball in cold water, remove from 
heat and beat until smooth and consistency to 
spread. Chopped nuts added before spreading 
make it even better. 

A DUMP CAKE 

Selected 

(Dear Little Cook: This cake will not make you 
dumpy. It just means you won't have to use and 
wash any mixing bowls. Just open boxes and 
cans and dump. Absolutely delicious! 
1 large can crushed pineapple with syrup 
1 large can cherry pie filling 

1 box white or yellow cake mix 
V2 cup pecans 

2 sticks butter or margarine, sliced into '/<" 
pats 

1 buttered 9x13 bakingdish or pan (this book is 
approx. 8x11) 



Dump in the pineapple (without draining) into 
pan and spread over bottom. Add the cherry pie 
filling and spread that, too. Sift the cake mix 
over the fruit as evenly as possible. Sprinkle the 
pecans over the cake mix. Distribute the butter 
pats evenly over the mixture, then sprinkle 
evenly with the brown sugar. Bake at 350 
degrees for an hour, remove the cake and serve 
hot with a scoop of ice cream with each 
serving— or cold with a whipped cream or other 
white topping. Serves 12 easily. 

CARAMEL BUTTER FROSTING 

Selected 

(In a hurry? You're bound to be. Everybody is. 
This is quick, easy and good.) 
V2 Cup butter 

1 Cup firmly packed brown sugar 
% Cup milk 

A box of confectioner's sugar. 

Melt butter; add brown sugar and bring to a 
boil over low heat. Boil 2 minutes, stirring 
constantly. Add milk; return to boil, stirring 
constantly. Remove from heat. Cool to luke- 
warm. Gradually beat in confectioners' sugar 
until spreading consistency. Don't forget to put 
in a teaspoon Vanilla flavoring. 
CARROT CAKE 

Selected 

3 Cups raw carrots, washed and grated 

4 Eggs 

3 Teaspoon cinnamon 

2 Teaspoon allspice 
1 Teaspoon cloves 

V2 Teaspoon Nutmeg 

[Continued on next page] 







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RECIPES Continued 

2 Teaspoon vanilla 

1 Teaspoon salt 

2 Cups sugar 

2 Teaspoon soda 

2 Cups flour 

V/! Cups Wesson oil 

Cream sugar, oil and eggs. Sift flour, salt, 
soda and spices and add to sugar, oil and egg 
mixture. Fold in grated carrots and vanilla. 
Bake in tube pan or ttiree pans at 325 about 30 
min. in small pans; 45 in big. 
Frosting: 
1 stick oleo 

1 package confectioners' sugar 
1 eight ounce package of Phil. Cream Cheese 

1 Cup chopped pecans 
Vanilla flavoring 

Do not cook. Just melt the butter and mix it 
all together and spread on cooled cake. 
(This cake and frosting is absolutely delicious. 
The cake stays moist a long time. People will 
think you are kidding when you tell them it's a 
carrot cake. But stick to your guns and show 
them a little hard-to-find piece of orange carrot 
in the baked cake.) 

FRUIT COCKTAIL CAKE 

(Easy and Delicious) 
Mix Together: 
I'/a cups sugar 

2 cups plain flour 
2 large eggs 

1 teaspoon soda 

1 pinch salt 

A lib. can fruit cocktail, drained somewhat 



Pour into a sheet cake pan and bake at 300 
degrees for an hour or so. This is the icing that 
makes it really good; Mix and bring to a boil. 
Vz cup sugar 

1 small can evaporated milk 
3 tablespoons water 
1 stick of butter or margarine 

Boil for 2 minutes. Add almond flavoring, and 
a cup of chopped pecans. With a fork, punch 
holes in the warm cake and pour the icing over 
the cake. (The holes permit the icing to really 
get into the cake and flavor it up.) Be careful: 
don't tear the cake up punching holes in it. This 
cake was introduced to the Riverside by Mrs. 
Peter Young. 

SOFT GINGERBREAD 

Vera Holman 

(If your Christmas decorations are short, get 
out the spices and fill your house with the 
aroma of this gingerbread in the oven. This 
recipe is 100 years old and has been and will 
continue to be a favorite of Vera Holman's 
family.) 
1 C sugar 
V! C butter 

1 C Molasses 

2 eggs well beaten 

1 teaspoon allspice 

3 C flour 

2 teaspoons soda 

2 teaspoons ginger 
2 teaspoons cinnamon 
Vj teaspoon nutmeg 
Vz teaspoon ground cloves 
Cream butter, add sugar gradually, molasses 



and eggs. Sift flour; measure and sift again with 
soda and spices. Add to butter mixture 
alternately with milk. Beat thoroughly. Bake in 
moderate oven. 

FRESH COCONUT CAKE 

All the way from Ohio 

Beatrice Thomas 

1 cup butter or margarine softened 

2 cups sugar 
4 eggs 

3 cups pre-sifted all purpose flour 

2 tsp. baking powder 
1 tsp. salt 

1 cup milk 

Vz tsp. lemon extract 

Vz tsp. vanilla 

Cream butter and sugar until light and fluffy. 
Add eggs one at a time beating after each 
addition. Combine flour, baking powder and 
salt. Add to creamed mixture alternately with 
milk, beating well after each addition. Blend in 
flavorings. Pour batter into 5 greased and 
floured nine-inch cake tins and bake at 350 for 
18 minutes or until done. Cool completely. 
Spread coconut filling between layers. (Recipe 
follows). 

Coconut milk from one coconut 
milk 

3 cups sugar 

1 fresh coconut grated 

Combine coconut milk with enough milk to 

make V/z cups of liquid and mix with sugar in a 

sauce pan. Bring to a boil; cook until slightly 

thick stirring constantly. Remove from heat and 

[Continued on next page] 



LeiAjis'DrugSfore 

phone 159-3561 





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i 



RECIPES Continued 

add 2 cups of grated coconut reserving the rest 
for the top and sides. Cool the filling completely 
and spread between each layer. 

Frost the top and sides of cake with your 
favorite 7-minute frosting. Sprinkle fresh coco- 
nut on the frosting. 

(This recipe won a prize when it was sent In to 
the Warren, Ohio Tribune by Mrs. Thomas' 
daughter, Mrs. Pauline Hawkins. Mrs. Thomas 
Is from Vienna, Ohio) 

BUTTERMILK POUND CAKE 

Susan Simpson Campbell & E. Grady Simpson 

3 cups sifted cake flour 
Vz teaspoon soda 

1 cup oleo or butter 
2% cups sugar 

4 eggs 

1 cup buttermilk 

1 teaspoon vanilla flavoring 

1 teaspoon almond flavoring 

Sift flour and soda together. In a separate 
bowl, cream sugar and butter until well 
blended. Add egg yolks one at a time beating 
thoroughly after each addition. Add buttermilk 
and flour alternately. Beat egg whites separate- 
ly until stiff, add vanilla and almond and fold in 
egg whites. Pour In tube pan (ten inches) which 
Is lined on the bottom with waxed paper. Bake 
at 350 for 40 minutes. Reduce heat to 325 and 
cook 20 to 30 minutes more. Check to see if it is 
ready by sticking a broomstraw In the center of 
the cake. If batter does not stick to the straw, 
the cake is done. 
(Everybody needs to make and eat this cake 



because the two submitting it are young, pretty 
and slender!) 

FUDGE CAKE 

Mrs. J.U.BIanchard 

Vj cup butter 
2 cups sugar 
4 eggs, beaten separately 

1 rounding cup flour 

4 Tablespoons cocoa or bitter chocolate 

2 teaspoons vanilla 

1 heaping cup chopped pecans 

Cream half sugar In butter and mix other half 
sugar in the very stiffly beaten egg whites and 
fold mto cake last. Bake very slowly for about 1 
hour From The Proof of the Pudding, a 
collection of recipes from the Shelby Woman's 
Club, published in 1965. 

FIG CAKE 

Velma Williams 

(Ed. note: The ladles In Benoit are not too much 
on staying home and cooking. They like to go 
down to Greenville to Mr. Tennenbaum's when 
they're on serious clothes business and to the 
Stem Mart when they're having fun or squiring 
out-of-town guests around. Occasionally, dur- 
ing off hours, you'll spot one In Baskln-Robblns. 
But when they do cook, man-oh-man. It's good. 
Velma Williams and her fig cake are from the 
heart of Benoit and the figs are off her or her 
neighbor's tree): 

2 C plain flour 
1 tsp. soda 

1 tsp. salt 
1 tsp. nutmeg 
1 tsp. cinnamon 



Vi tsp. allspice 

1'/; C sugar 

1 C oil (Wesson preferred) 

1 C figs or fig preserves 

1 teaspoon vanilla 

3 eggs 

1 C buttermilk 
'/j C chopped nuts 

Sift together flour, salt, soda, sugar and 
spices. Add oil, beat well. Add eggs. Beat well. 
Add milk, beat well, then add vanilla, figs, and 
nuts. Pour Into buttered 9x13x2 Inch pan or 2 
cake pans. Bake 45 minutes at 325. 
Sauce for Fig Cake 
1 C sugar 
Vz C buttermilk 
1 Teaspoon vanilla 
1 stick oleo 

1 Tablespoon corn syrup 
Vz Teaspoon soda 

Mix Ingredients and boil 3 minutes. Pour over 
cake while it Is still warm. (I usually cut this 
sauce recipe In half). 

JAM CAKE 

Mrs. Joe Yates, Jr. 

4 eggs 

1 cup sugar 

I'/j cup jam 

1 cup buttermilk 

1 cup lard or butter 

1 teaspoon allspice 

1 heaping teaspoon soda 

3 rounded cups flour 

1 teaspoon cinnamon 

[Continued on next page] 



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RECIPES Continued 

1 teaspoon ginger 

1 teaspoon cloves (ground) 

Dissolve soda in buttermilk and add to 
well-beaten mixture. Cook in 2 layers in 
moderate oven. Use caramel frosting for filling 
and frosting; 
Caramel filling & frosting 

2 egg yolks 
2% cup sugar 

1 Tablespoon flour 
'A pound butter 
1 teaspoon vanilla 
1 cup milk 
1 Tablespoon Karo 

Mix flour and sugar, beat eggs well, add milk 
and butter & Karo. Bring mixture to boil. Brown 

3 Tablespoon sugar. Add browned sugar. Stir 
until mixture forms a soft ball in water. Remove 
from stove and add vanilla. When cool, beat and 
spread. From The Proof of the Pudding, a 
collection of recipes by the Shelby Woman's 
Club, published in 1965. 

SAUCE FOR CAKE 

Mary Allen Bostick 

1 package instant vanilla pudding made 

according to directions on box 
1 Cup Cool Whip 
'A Cup white rum 

Mix all together and serve on angel food cake, 
pound cake, etc. 

(Ed. note: Cool Whip is the greatest invention 
since the light bulb. You're always prepared if 
you've got some in the fridge. Probably any kind 
of spirits could be substituted for the rum, 



except Dr. Tichenor's) 

CHOCOLATE CAKE 



by Vera Jacobs 

Sift together: 

2 cups flour 

2 cups sugar 

Boil together: 

4 Tablespoons cocoa 

2 sticks oleo (or 1 stick oleo & Vi cup crisco) 

1 cup water 

Mix all of the atxsve together. Add to the 
mixture: 
V? Cup buttermilk 

1 teaspoon soda 
'/j teaspoon salt 

2 eggs 

1 teaspoon vanilla 

Bake at 350 degrees 25 to 30 minutes in an 
11x14 pan. 
Icing 

Boil together: 
1 stick oleo 
4 Tablespoons cocoa 
'/2 cup buttermilk 
1 teaspoon vanilla 

As soon as this mixture boils, remove from 
heat and add enough confectioners' sugar until 
it is the right consistency to spread over cake. 
Wonderful and will keep moist for days if kept 
covered. 

HERSHEY BAR CAKE 

Martha Farmer 

8 plain "5 cent" Hershey bars (no telling what 

they cost now) 
1 5'/2 oz. can Hershey chocolate syrup 



2 cups sugar 

2 sticks oleo 
4 eggs 

2'/2 cups all purpose flour 

1 cup Buttermilk 

'/2 Teaspoon soda in Buttermilk 

1 Cup pecans, chopped 

1 Teaspoon vanilla 

Cream butter and sugar, add eggs one at a 
time. Beat well. Add melted candy bars and 
syrup. Mix well. Add flour and buttermilk 
alternately. Add pecans and vanilla last. Bake 
in tube pan 1 hour and 15 minutes in a 350 
degree oven. No frosting needed. If someone 
special is coming and they like chocolate — this 
is the cake for them! 

MARIE'S COOKIES 

by Viva Hall Mclnnls 

1 cup sugar 

3 cups self-rising flour 

1 cup Wesson oil 

2 eggs 

1 Teaspoon vanilla 

Put oil in bowl, then sugar and stir lightly. Mix 
in eggs and vanilla. Add flour and mix. Roll in 
small balls and put on greased cookie sheet and 
flatten slightly with fork or finger. Cook in 350 
oven for about 10 minutes. EASY. 
TUXEDO WAFERS 

by Janle Ewing 

1% cup cake flour (sifted) 

1 Cup brown sugar 

Vz Cup butter 

'/2 Teaspoon powdered ginger 

[Continued on next page] 



^0 W ^0 V 

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RECIPES Continued 

Almost V; Cup milk 

Make a dough; roll very thin;' put on buttered 
sheet. Sprinkle with finely chopped pecans. 
Bake 8 minutes at 325 degrees. Cut into 
squares. 

DATE TARTS 

by Sal Gardner 

(Everybody always says, "Sal, you bring those 

delicious date tarts".) 

1 pound pitted dates 

1 cup boiling water with 

1 Teaspoon soda in it. 

Pour water and soda over the dates. 

To this add: 

1 beaten egg 

1 cup flour 

1 cup sugar. 

Mix it all well and add 1 teaspoon vanilla and 

1 cup chopped pecans. 

Put in greased muffin tins and bake in 325 
degree oven for 20 to 30 minutes. Do not 
over bake. 

Candy 

DIVINITY CANDY 

Margaret Harris McDowell 

2 Cups white sugar 
Vz cup white Karo 
'/2 cup water 

Mix and cook until mixture forms a hard ball 
that you can pick up and clink on the side of the 
cup. Beat 3 egg whites until stiff and gradually 
add syrup to them. Beat until firm enough to 



drop from spoon on to wax paper. (If the candy 
is sticky, put it in a pan and let it steam over 
boiling water for 15 to 20 minutes). Then beat & 
drop. In any case, before dropping add vanilla 
flavoring and chopped nuts if desired. 
(Ed. Note: Mrs, McDowell is from the famous 
Booga Bottom Store off Hwy. 61 between 
Hushpuckena and Duncan. The food there is 
always good & there's not a better cook on the 
whole stretch of U.S. 61 than Mrs. McDowell). 
KARO CARAMEL CANDY 

Selected 

1 Cup sugar 

1 Cup Karo 
Va Cup water 
'A Cup vinegar 

2 Tablespoons butter 
1 teaspoon vanilla 

Mix all ingredients except vanilla. Boil until it 
forms a soft ball when dropped into small 
amount of tap water. Remove from stove. Add 
vanilla and pour in well greased pan to cool. Cut 
in squares before it gets too hard. 
EASY FUDGE 

Selected 

1 box confectioners' sugar 

Vz cup cocoa 

'/« teaspoon salt 

6 Tablespoons butter or oleo 

4 Tablespoons Milk 

1 teaspoon vanilla 

Combine ingredients in top of double boiler. 
Place over water and stir until smooth. Spread 
candy quickly in a buttered 9x5 loaf pan. 




Pies & Desserts 

SOUTHERN PECAN PIE 

BernJce Baker 

(One of the mysteries of life is how something as 
delicious as this pecan pie is can be so easy. It is 
never fail. Sometimes, if you have a tempera- 
mental oven, it will keep the crust from cooking 
faster than the pie filling if you put a small pan 
of water in the bottom of the oven.) 
3 eggs 
1 scant C sugar 

1 scant C dark Karo 

Mix these together and add: 

2 T flour stirred in V2 C Pet evaporated milk 
(undiluted) 

Add 1 teaspoon vanilla 

add V2 stick butter or oleo (melted) 

add 1 C pecans 

Pour this filling into a 9 and 5/8 inch unbaked 
pie shell. Cook at 350 for 30 to 40 minutes until 
it is frim in the center. (May take a little longer 
than 30 min.). 

[Continued on next page] 




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RECIPES Continued 

GRANNIE S CHOCOUTE PIE 

Dot Hester 

2 C sugar 

3 T cocoa 

6 T cornstarch 
1 C water 

1 C milk 

5 egg yolks 

3 T butter or oleo 

2 t vanilla 
dash of salt 

Mix sugar, cocoa and cornstarch until well 
blended. Add water; stir in to sugar and cocoa 
mixture. Add well beaten egg yolks (I add the 
milk to the yolks to mix them as it seems tc 
make them mix better) Add to chocolate 
mixture. Add butter, vanilla and salt. Cook over 
medium heat, stirring constantly until thick. 
Cool and pour into baked pie shell. (This is 
enough for 1 deep dish pie or two shallow ones.) 
Spread meringue on pie and bake until 
browned. 
Meringue 
5 egg whites 
'/2 teaspoon cream of tartar 

Beat egg whites and cream of tartar on 
highest speed of mixer until stiff. Add 10 
tablespoons sugar one tablespoon at a time. 
Add '/2 teaspoon vanilla. Beat until very stiff. 
Spread on pie. 

CHESS PIE 

Louise Hester 

1 stick oleo 
l'/2 cup sugar 



3 eggs 

1 Tablespoon corn meal 

1 Tablespoon vinegar 

Cream oleo and sugar, add eggs, corn meal 
and vinegar. Bake in unbaked pie shell for 
about 35 minutes at 375 degrees. 
KARO PECAN PIE 

Helen Gray 

1 cup sugar 

1 cup dark Karo 

1 cup chopped pecans 

1 Teaspoon vanilla 

3 whole eggs 

% cup oleo 

Pour all ingredients into raw pie shell and 
cook at 345 degrees for 45 minutes or a little 
more until firm. Serve with topping of whipped 
cream, ice cream or cool whip. 

PEACH PIE WITH WHISKEY SAUCE 

From Old Vienna [Ohio] 

Beatrice Thomas 

8 to 10 fresh peaches 
1 cup of sugar 
unbaked pie crust 
'/z cup whiskey 

Peel and slice peaches. Mix well with sugar in 
a sauce pan and cook on top of the stove for 1 5 
minutes after mixture comes to a boil. Roll out 
your favorite pie crust and line a large oblong 
(9x13) baking dish. After peaches have cooled 
slightly, mix in Vz cup of whiskey and pour 
peaches & whiskey over crust. Bake at 375 for 
40 minutes. Serve with; 
Whiskey Sauce 
'/2 cup whiskey 



1 cup sugar 

'/« tsp. ground nutmeg 

2 cups hot water. 

Caramelize sugar in iron skillet. When light 
brown add hot water and cook until sugar is 
melted & smooth. Pour into a small pitcher. Add 
whiskey and nutmeg and serve hot. Serves 8 to 
12. (This is different and good and will definitely 
cheer up the household.) 

ENGLISH PIE 

Vashti Hendricks 

1 Stick of Butter 

2 cups sugar 
4 eggs 

1 Tablespoon vinegar 

2 Tablespoon flour 

1 Tablespoon ground cinnamon 

1 Tablespoon allspice 

1 Tablespoon ground cloves 

1 Cup chopped pecans 

1 cup seedless raisins. 

Mix all ingredients well. Pour in two small pie 
shells. Cook in 300 degree oven 35 to 40 
minutes. 

(Ed. Note; Mrs. Hendricks and her friends play 
bridge regularly. When a recipe survives on the 
bridge circuit it is above average.) 
WELSH APPLE CUSTARD 

Mrs. Allen Richard Nason's 

1 pt. applesauce 

3 eggs 

'/2 stick butter or margarine 
'/4 to % cup sugar to taste 
Nutmeg and/or other flavoring 

[Continued on next page] 



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RECIPES Continued 

Place applesauce In mixing bowl, whip at low 
speed, add eggs, sugar and flavoring, mixing 
thoroughly. Pour in unbaked pie shell. Dot with 
butter. Bake in moderate oven until shell is 
done. Do not place top crust on pie. Serve warm 
with a glass of sweet milk for supper. Serve 
with whipped cream or ice cream and coffee for 
party dessert. From The Proof of the Pudding, 
a collection of recipes from the Shelby Woman's 
Club, published in 1965. 

APPLE PIE 

Helen Parkinson 

5 tart apples, peeled and quartered 
1 C pineapple juice 
1 C sugar 
1/8 1 salt 

Boil sugar, salt and juice. Add the apples to 
the boiling mixture and let them cook only until 
they are barely tender, with only a small 
amount of stirring. (Now comes the trick) Get 
the slightly tender apples out of the boiling 
mixture and arrange them in an unbaked pie 
crust. Now be sure you have a cup of juice 
mixture left and to it add one Tablespoon butter 
and gently stir in 1 teaspoon flour and one 
teaspoon vanilla. Mix this well and pour over 
the apples in the crust. Top with a lattice crust 
and bake at 400 degrees until crust is 
done— about 30 minutes. (If you'll follow these 
instructions, you'll have a really good apple 
pie!) 



CHESS PIE 



Rozelle Meadors 



Cream together: 



1 stick soft butter (no substitute) 
I'/z cup sugar. 
Add one at a time: 

3 eggs 

1 level tablespoon corn meal 

Vl teaspoon salt 

1 Tablespoon vinegar 

1 teaspoon vanilla 

Sprinkle a little nutmeg on top if desired 

Pour in unbaked crust. Bake at 3(X) degrees 
for one hour or until firm. As we all know— all 
oven temperatures are not the same so don't 
let it brown too fast. Mrs. MP. Meadors 
CHERRY-CREAM CHEESE PIE 

(If you find out they're coming, whip up this 
excellent dessert in a jiffy. If they don't get 
there for a couple of days, it won't matter- 
keeps well.) 
1 Crumb crust 
For Filling: 

Beat 1 pkg. (8oz.) Cream Cheese 
Add 1 can condensed milk 
Vi Cup lemon juice 
1 teaspoon vanilla. 

Turn into the crust. Refrigerate several hours 
(2 or 3). Garnish with 1 can cherry pie filling 
before serving. 

PARTY PUDDING 

Lucy Jackson 

4 Eggs 

1 sugar 

1 C sherry 

2 Cartons Whipping Cream 

1 Pound Cake (made with butter) 
Separate eggs, beat yolks well, and cream in 



sugar. Add sherry slowly. Slowly pour in double 
boiler but do not boil. Heat until thick. Remove 
and put in cold water. While cooling, beat egg 
whites and fold in. Beat the whipping cream 
and fold it in. Slice cake thin and place in 
bottom of pan and around sides. Pour in '/2 the 
mix, top this with second layer of cake and then 
remaining mix. Leave in refrigerator for 24 
hours, after covering carefully with foil. Hold 
foil up with toothpicks. 

(Another Rosedale recipe that will put you on 
the best cook list). 

CARAMEL CUSTARD CUPS 

Selected 

1. Turn on oven to 350 

2. Press 1 Tablespoon brown sugar into 4 
custard cups 

3. Mix in a 1 quart bowl: 2 eggs slightly beaten 

1 cup Pet milk 
Vi cup water 
1/3 cup sugar 
Vh teaspoon vanilla 
Few grains salt 

4. Pour the egg & milk carefully over brown 
sugar. Set cups in a shallow pan holding 1 inch 
hot water. Bake 50 minutes, or until knife 
inserted near edge of custard comes out clean. 
Cool. Loosen edges with knife. Unmold and top 
with whipped cream or Cool Whip. 

AMBROSIA 

The late Mrs. Joe Yates, Sr. 

(When it's holiday time, it's time for Ambrosia!) 
1 doz. large oranges, peeled & shucked from 
membrane 

[Continued on next page] 



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REUPES Continued 

1 large can of crushed pineapple 

1 large coconut, grated 

'/j pound grapes seeded or use white seedless 

Sugar to sweeten to taste. 

Mix all ingredients except coconut. Add 
coconut just before serving. Top with whipped 
cream or a cherry. The Ambrosia can be kept 
for several days in a covered dish in the 
refrigerator. From The Proof of the Pudding, a 
collection of recipes of the Shelby Woman's 
Club, published in 1965. 

BOILED CUSTARD 

Selected 

3 eggs 

1 Cup sugar 

1 Tablespoon flour 

1 quart Milk 

1 dash salt 

1 teaspoon vanilla 

Combine flour with sugar. Beat egg yolks well 
and add the sugar and flour mixture. Heat milk 
to boiling point and add the egg, sugar and flour 
mixture, stirring rapidly. Continue to stir until 
you see the first bubble. DO NOT boil. Take off 
stove, strain and add vanilla. Serve cold. 
(Ed. Note: This is a wonderful treat to take to a 
friend who's "under the weather" — tasty, 
nourishing and soothing). 

PEACH ICE CREAM 

Dot Hester 

(Everything Dot Hester does is A-1. When the 
mothers and the wives get something an 
ordinary mortal can't handle like a wedding or a 
tea for a crowd they sound the call for Dot 



whose flower arrangements and culinary crea- 
tions are extraordinary. If you've been search- 
ing for a good recipe for peach ice cream, this 
has got to be it.) 
2 C sugar 
2 T corn starch 

1 can sweetened condensed milk (such as Eagle 

Brand) 

2 cartons whipping cream 
'/2 gallon sweet milk 

9 eggs, well beaten 

2 T vanilla 

1 Quart fresh or frozen sweetened peaches 

(add sugar to taste) 

Mix sugar and corn starch until all lumps are 
gone. Add condensed milk and whipping cream. 
Stir until well blended. Add rest of milk. 
Meanwhile beat eggs on high speed in mixer 
until well beaten. Add eggs to milk. Add vanilla. 
Cook on medium heat stirring constantly until 
slightly thickened. DO NOT BOIL. Take off heat 
and cool completely. Put peaches in blender 
and blend for a few seconds. Add to cooled 
mixture and stir in. Pour in freezer can and 
freeze according to directions on freezer. 
CHOCOLATE CHESS PIE 

Ruth Wiggins 

(The Wheels section was compiled and put 
together by Ruth) 

1 pie shell 
l'/2 C sugar 

'/2 stick margarine (melted) 

3 T. cocoa 

2 eggs 

1 small can Pet milk 



'/? cup pecans 

Mix all ingredients together. Pour into 
unbaked pie shell. Bake at 325 for 40 minutes. 




Meats 



8 CAN CHICKEN BUFFET CASSEROLE 

Monnie Nunnery 

(Ed. Note: This book is in no way advocating 
that you be deceitful but we do guarantee that if 
you pass by the grocery and pick up these cans 
in between the bridge club and the buffet 
supper you're having, all your guests will think 
you've been home cooking all day.) 
4 or 5 cups cooked chicken or turkey 
1 cam cream of mushroom soup 
1 can cream of chicken soup 
1 can pet milk, large 

1 can water chestnuts 

2 cans Chinese noodles 

2 cans onion rings (save one for topping) 

8 stalks celery, chopped and sauteed in butter 

2 cans French cut green beans 

1 can mushrooms 

1 teaspoon Lowery Seasoning salt 

[Continued on next page] 




THESOinHlLlKS FINEST 

FOOD STORES 
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RECIPES Continued 

1 teaspoon celery seed 

1 teaspoon parsley flakes 
pepper to taste 

Mix all ingredients and put into a shallow 
baking dish. Cover with one can onion rings and 
bake % hour at 250 or until topping is crusty. 
BARBECUED SHRIMP 

Selected 

(Without a doubt, this recipe will involve a trip 
to the grocery store. No one could have this 
many spices on their shelf at home. But it'll be 
worth it.) 

2 sticks butter in a skillet 
'/z cup oil, added to it 

One or two pods of garlic, chopped fine 

2 Teaspoons Rosemary leaf 

V2 teaspoon basil 

Vz teaspoon oregano 

V2 teaspoon salt 

'/z teaspoon cayenne pepper 

1 tablespoon paprika 

% teaspoon fresh ground pepper 

1 teaspoon lemon juice 

Blend it all in the skillet with the butter and 
leave it in there on a low, low simmer for 30 
minutes. 

Add 2 pounds of de-headed shrimp-in-the- 
shell and simmer for eight minutes after the 
shrimp turn pink. Then, let them set in a warm 
oven a while before eating. Some of the 
Louisiana people eat the shell and all— just be 
sure you get the heads off the shrimp before 
you put them in the barbecue sauce. 



CHICKEN DIVAN 

Selected 

2 10 oz. pkgs frozen broccoli 
l'/2 C medium white sauce 

1 Can cream of chicken soup, undiluted 
'A teaspoon grated nutmeg 
'/? C rich mayonnaise 

3 Tablespoons dry sherry 

1 Teaspoon Worcestershire sauce 

Salt & Pepper to taste 

% cup grated Parmesan cheese 

16 generous slice cooked chicken, preferably 

breasts 

Cook and drain the broccoli and arrange it on 
the bottom of a baking dish. Sprinkle with half 
the cheese. Arrange the sliced chicken over 
this. Combine all the other ingredients (except 
the cheese) and pour over the chicken. Sprinkle 
with the remaining cheese and bake uncovered 
at 375 for about 30 minutes or more. 
SCALLOPED EGGS 

Betsy Winn 

10 eggs boiled-Set aside 

1 cup white sauce made from 2 tablespoons 
butter 

2 tablespoons flour and 1 cup milk, stirred 
over low heat until thick. -Set aside 

Make a Creole Sauce of; 

1 tablespoon butter 

1 tablespoon flour 

1 #2 Can tomatoes 

1 medium onion chopped fine 

1 bell pepper chopped fine 

1 tablespoon chili powder 

1 teaspoon salt 



Cook until well blended. Mix the White and 
Creole Sauces. Place sliced boiled eggs on 
bottom of buttered -casserole. Add sauce. 
Alternate eggs and sauce. Bake 15 or 20 
minutes in a medium oven with cover. Uncover. 
Put buttered crumbs on top and brown. 
CHICKEN RING 

Betsy Winn 

1 Medium sized chicken 

5 oz. pkg. of noodles 
4 eggs 

Salt, pepper & paprika 

Cook noodles in water & drain. Beat eggs, 
add Vi cup butter or melted chicken fat, 2 cups 
stock or milk. Pour the egg mixture over layers 
of chicken and noodle in deep ring mold Bake 
45 min. or 1 hr. in 375 oven. Fill center with 
carrots and potato balls (cooked) and cover 
whole dish with mushroom sauce. 
SMOTHERED QUAIL 

Mrs. Oscar Wolfe, Jr. 

Salt and pepper 

Vi cup butter 

6 or 8 cleaned (or frozen) quail 
Flour 

Salt and pepper quail and roll in flour. Melt 
butter in a large skillet (hot). Place birds in 
skillet. Sear both sides quickly, then reduce 
heat and cook until tender, turning frequently. 
Brown flour lightly, add Vz cup water, cover and 
steam. Serve the gravy over rice or hot 
biscuits. 

(WOW! What a dish. Going down (or up) 
highway 1 at Gunnison, you can get all the quail 

[Continued on next page] 




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RECIPES Continued 

you want without loading your gun. The 
Warfield Quail Farm is at Gunnison and there is 
always a fine stock of the birds there. 
FILE-CHICKEN GUMBO 

Hazel Mill 

1 Baking Hen, cup in pieces and browned in 

% cup oil. 

Take the chicken pieces out of the oil and set 

them aside. Add to the oil: 

1 cup chopped onion 

6 cloves garlic 

1 teaspoon hot red pepper 

2 teaspoons paprika 

Cook until onions wilt. Add Vz cup flour and 
stir and cook until mixture is brown. Put this 
mixture, chicken and 2 quarts of cold water in a 
big pot. Add salt to taste. Cover and cook for 2 
hours on medium heat. Turn off the heat and 
add 2 tablespoons File. Stir well. Serve over hot 
cooked rice. This is also good with corn bread. 
Be prepared to give out the recipe to all who are 
privileged to have this. It's wonderful. This is a 
fact: File is made from Sassafras leaves. It is 
pronounced FEE-LAY. Do not cook mushy rice. 
ROTEL CHICKEN 

Miss Viva 

1 can cream of mushroom soup 

1 can cream of chicken soup 

1 can Rotel tomatoes with green chilies 

1 can chicken broth 

1 medium onion, chopped 

1 large bag corn chips (Dorita), partially 

crushed 
'/2 to 1 cup grated cheese 



Mix and heat to simmering the soups, 
tomatoes, broth and onion. Sprinkle layer of 
chips in greased 8x12 inch bakingdish. Add one 
half of chicken pieces from 1 fryer, boiled until 
tender. Cover with layer of soup mixture. 
Repeat ending with chips and last, the cheese. 
Bake in 350 oven 30 to 45 minutes. And you're 
ready for the Queen of England! This serves 
about 10. Don't forget to take the chicken off 
the bone and cut it up in bite sizes. Slip in a 
little extra chicken and it'll be even better! Mrs. 
Adiia Mclnnis of Rosedale. 
(There's never been a bad cook or recipe in 
Rosedale. It's famous for tasty food.) 

APPETIZER HAM BALL 



Norma Mallard 

(From now on keep a can or two of deviled ham, 
a jar of olives, and mustard on your kitchen 
shelf and a package of cream cheese in the 
fridge. Like all good housekeepers you naturally 
always have milk. Have these things on hand 
and you'll always be ready to whip up this 
appealing appetizer. Ed.) 
2 4'/2 oz. can deviled ham 
2 Tablespoons chopped olives 
1 Tablespoon prepared mustard 

1 3 oz. pkg. cream cheese (softened) 

2 teaspoons milk. 

Blend ham, olives and mustard to taste. Form 
a ball on serving dish; chill. Combine cream 
cheese and milk and frost ham ball. Chill. 
Remove from ice box 15 min. before serving. 
Serve with snack crackers. 



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IMPERIAL CHICKEN 

Bobbye Boyd 

1 or 2 fryers (cut in pieces) 

2 cups fine bread crumbs 

Va cup grated Parmesan cheese 
% cup chopped parsley 

1 clove garlic 

2 teaspoons salt and '/? teaspoon pepper 

1 stick oleo 

Dip chicken pieces into melted garlic butter, 
then into dry mixture. Arrange in a pan so they 
don't overlap. Bake at 350 for 1 hour or until 
fork tender. 

ROAST 

Selected 

3-4 pound rolled rump roast 

Place in baking dish or Dutch oven. Do not 
add salt and pepper. Spoon 1 can of mushroom 
soup over roast. Sprinkle 1 envelope dry onion 
soup mix over it. Cover with foil. Bake at 400 
degrees for 1 hour. Add potatoes and carrots 
and bake until done. 

SOUTHERN HAM PIE 

Jeanette Turbeville 

2 cups cooked, cut-up ham 
4 hard boiled, sliced eggs 

3 Tablespoons butter or oleo 
Pepper and dash of salt 

Casserole dish 9 or 10 in. long by 2 in. deep 
Pie crust, enough to line casserole dish and top 
1 cup milk or a little more & you can use ham 

broth. 

Line casserole dish with pie crust (uncooked). 
[Continued on next page] 



mthevaookoronthefarm 
NOTHING Runs LIKE A DtE RE 




GREENVlur MISSISSIPPI 38101 



■146 




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RECIPES Continued 

Add ham, eggs, butter, salt and pepper. Pour 
milk or broth over this. Place top crust on pie; 
dot with butter, cook at 350 until crust is 
brown. Mrs. Turbeville says, "This was my 
mother's recipe. It is old and very good". 
PARTY CHICKEN BREASTS 

Dot Hester 

(Go on Call 'em up and invite 'em. This is as 
good a time as any. Toss up Lynda Lee Stock's 
Spinach Salad and fix Betty Jean Conger's 
Cheese Souffle. And when you add these 
Chicken Breasts, you can invite the queen 
herself.) 

8 chicken breast halves {skinned and boned) 
8 slices of dried beef 
8 slices of bacon. 

Line casserole with dried beef. Wrap each 
chicken breast with 1 slice of bacon. Place 
chicken breast on top of dried beef. Mix 
together 1 can cream of mushroom soup and 1 
carton of sour cream. Pour over chicken. Cover 
with foil and cook in 3CXD degree oven for 2'/2 
hours. Remove cover and bake another 30 
minutes. 

CHILE BURGERS 

Selected 

1 pound ground beef (lean) 

1 medium cnion 

2 T, Wesson oil 
'/? cup water 
Vz cup catsup 

2 T brown sugar 

1 teaspoon dry mustard 

2 teaspoon chili powder 

Brown onion in oil. Saute meat. Add remain- 
ing ingredients. Cook I'/j hours covered. Add 
water if necessary to keep a slight liquid 
consistency. 



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BEEF BOURGNIGNONNE 

Selected 

2 pounds chuck (cut in bite size pieces and 
sprinkled with garlic salt and seasoned salt) 

2 cans Golden Mushroom soup 

1 pkg. Onion Soup Mix 

'/z soup can of sherry 

1 four ounce can mushrooms, drained 

1 can sliced carrots 
Combine first five ingredients in heavy three 

quart casserole dish. Bake covered for 2 to ZVz 

hours at 350. Last 30 minutes add carrots. 

Serve over rice or noodles. (The hardest thing 

about this recipe is pronouncing it). 
CHEESE SOUFFLE 

Betty Jean Conger 

(You can't go wrong on this one if you'll just 
remember to get it fixed up the night before and 
put It in the fridge. It's never fail from a smart 
girl who's a good cook as well as good with 
bookkeeping. Betty Jean is treasurer of the 
Burrus House Restoration project. Here we go:) 

Trim 8 slices of breasd. Butter twth sides and 
cut into 2 inch squares. 

Grate 2 cups of sharp cheese. 

Alternate layers of bread and cheese in deep 
casserole 'til cheese is on top. 

Beat 6 eggs Add 3 cups milk, % teaspoon dry 
mustard, % teaspoon salt and pepper. Pour 
over cheese and bread. Refrigerate overnight. 
Bake 1 hour at 350 and serve hot. 



XX 



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QUICHE LORRAINE 

Selected 

1 recipe for pie crust 
4 eggs 

I'/j C half and half cream 
Dash of salt, cayenne & nutmeg. 

2 C (8 oz ) Swiss or Gruyere cheese 
12 strips bacon, cooked and crumbled 

Line pan with crust. Beat eggs, cream, and 
seasonings. Sprinkle cheese in crust, then 
bacon. Pour in egg mixture. Bake at 425 for 15 
minutes, then reduce to 350 for 30 minutes, 
more or less. (Ham, chicken or seafood may be 
used instead of bacon). 

CATFISH PORTUGUESE STYLE 

Humphreys County Board of Supervisors 

(From the catfish capital of the world. If you 
don't like this, take it up with the board of 
supervisors of Humphreys County. They are a 
great bunch and will be relieved to learn you've 
come about a recipe instead of a new bridge or 
road. It's delicious, though. You'll love it!) 
6 skinned, pan dressed catfish, frozen or fresh 
2 teaspoons salt 
% teaspoon pepper 

1 tablespoon olive or cooking oil 

2 cloves garlic, cut in halves 

1 cup diced, peeled, seeded tomatoes 
1 (4 oz) can sliced mushrooms, drained 

1 tablespoon instant minced onions 

2 tablespoons capers 
% cup chopped parsley 
'/2 cup water 

'/; teaspoon oregano 
Lemon wedges 

Thaw frozen fish. Clean, wash, dry fish. 
Season inside and out with salt and pepper. 
Cook garlic in oil in frying pan until brown. 
Remove garlic. Add remaining ingredients 

[Continued on next page] 



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except catfish and simmer 7 to eight minutes. 
Place fish In sauce. Spoon sauce over top of 
fish. Cover. Simmer for 15 to 20 minutes or 
until fish flakes easily when tested with fork. 
Garnish with lemon wedges. Makes 6 servings. 
CATFISH PARMESAN 

Humphreys County Board of Supervisors 

6 skinned, pan dressed catfish, fresh or frozen 
2 cups dry bread crumbs 
% cup Parmesan cheese 
% cup chopped parsley 

1 teaspoon paprika 
Lemon wedges 

% cup melted margarine or cooking oil 

2 teaspoons salt 

Vi teaspoon leaf oregano 
Va teaspoon basil leaf 
'/2 teaspoon pepper 

Thaw frozen fish. Clean, wash, dry fish. 
Combine bread crumbs, Parmesan cheese, 
parsley, paprika, oregano, basil, salt and 
pepper. Dip catfish In melted margarine and 
roll In crumb mixture. Arrange fish in well 
greased baking dish, 14x9x2. Bake In a 375 
degree oven for 20 to 25 minutes or until fish 
flakes easily when tested with fork. Garnish 
with lemon wedges. 




Vegetables 

COPPER PENNIES 

Selected 

(These carrots will brighten up an everyday 



plate or a dressy buffet table. They'll be 
especially good when the menu Is on the bland 
side for they have a zesty green pepper flavor. 
Once you get the carrots peeled or scraped 
you've got It made. Keeps well in fridge, too. We 
don't claim that you'll be able to stop wearing 
glasses when you eat these carrots, but they 
are supposed to be good for vision, night 
especially.) 

3 pounds fresh carrots, peeled & sliced In % In. 
rounds 

2 medium onions thinly sliced Into rings 

1 medium green pepper cut into thin strips 

1 10'/2 oz. can tomato soup 

% cup vinegar 

Vz cup sugar 

'/2 cup Wesson Oil 

1 Teaspoon Worcestershire sauce 

1 Teaspoon prepared mustard 

Vz Teaspoon salt 

Cook carrots In small amount water until 
tender. Drain and mix with onion and peppers. 
Heat the other Ingredients until they come to a 
boil. Pour over the other ingredients (the 
carrots, onions & peppers). Let cool. Then place 
In refrigerator and marinate overnight. 
STUFFED PEPPERS 

Betsy Winn 

3 medium to large green peppers 

Cut the tops off and hollow them out getting the 

seeds and white pieces. 
1 cup cooked rice 

1 4'/? oz. can Underwood's Deviled Ham 
Salt to taste 

2 Eggs 

Mix rice, deviled ham and eggs and stir till 
mixed well. Stuff peppers with this mixture and 
place In pyrex casserole dish sitting In container 
with 1 Inch of water. Cook Vz hour at 350 
degrees. Note: Hooray, Mrs. Winn adds that the 
peppers can be prepared and then frozen^jntM 
It's time to bake and serve! 



SQUASH CASSEROLE 

Eva Ann Boschert 

2 cups squash sliced; cooked and drained but 

NOT mashed 
1 cup sour cream 
1 can cream of chicken soup 
1 carrot, grated 
1 onion, chopped fine 
1 2 ounce jar pimento, chopped 

Mix above. Line casserole pan Pepperldge 
Farm Herb stuffing. Add enough butter or oleo 
to hold together. Pour In squash mixture, 
sprinkle herb stuffing crumbs on top and bake 
at 350 for 30 minutes. 

THREE VEGETABLE CASSEROLE WITH 

EGG DRESSING 



Kathleen Wallace 

Cook; 
Lima Beans, string beans and English peas as 
If you were going to serve them separately. 

Prepare Egg Dressing: 

1 cup mayonnaise 

1 onion grated or chopped fine 

3 Tablespoons Wesson Oil 
1 Teaspoon Mustard 

1 Teaspoon Worcestershire Sauce 
Dash of Tabasco 

4 boiled eggs, grated 

Mix all Ingredients except part of the grated 
eggs. Drain vegetables. Make layer of English 
Peas, Lima and String Beans In large casserole. 
Cover with dressing while vegetables are hot; 
sprinkle grated eggs on top and serve. It's 
better when I add one can of chopped water 
chestnuts to the egg dressing. 
CORN PUDDING 

Betty Jean Conger 

1 can Pride of Illinois cream style corn 

[Continued on next page] 







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RECIPES Continued] 

1 stick butter or oleo, melted 

3 eggs, beaten 

Mix above Ingredients and pour Into casse- 
role. Bake at 350 degrees 'til set— 30 to 40 min. 
SPIN ACH STUFFED TOMATOES 

Viva Lea Mclnnls Jones 

(From Petersburg, Virginia) 
1 package frozen chopped spinach 
1 beef bouillon cube 
1 small onion chopped 

1 cup Pepperldge Farm stuffing 
Vz stick margarine 

V2 Cup Parmesan cheese 
A dash of garlic (Is there any such thing as a 
little garlic?) 

2 beaten eggs 

4 tomatoes 

Cook spinach with bouillon cube and drain 
well. (Don't cook It to death) Saute margarine 
and onions. Combine spinach, onions, stuffing, 
spices, and cheese. Add eggs and mix well. Cut 
top and bottom off tomatoes. Cut hole down 
Into one end of tomato and scoop out. Stuff with 
spinach mixture. Bake covered at 350 for 20 
minutes. A culinary delight! 

SWEET POTATO CROQUETTES 

Mrs. J.D. Haralson 

2 medium baked sweet potatoes 

3 Tablespoons flour 
1 cup sugar 

Mix potatoes, sugar and flour. Coat lightly in 
sifted flour. Shape and brown in hot bacon 
drippings. Do not leave them. They burn easily. 



Serves 4. 



SQUASH CASSEROLE 



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Miss Viva's 

2 cups cooked yellow squash 

1 small onion grated 

1 carrot grated 

1 Cup sour cream 

1 Cup of Cream of Chicken Soup, undiluted 

1 pkg. herb dressing or stuffing mix 
Salt and pepper to taste 

Mix all ingredients except stuffing, after 
cooking the squash and onion together. In 
separate bowl, mix Vz cup melted butter and 
the stuffing. Line bottom of casserole with 
stuffing mix and alternate with squash, ending 
with stuffing on top. Bake 45 mIn. at 300. 
Serves 10. 

(Even people who don't like squash will like 
this— out of this world! Mrs. Adila Mclnnis— 
from Rosedale, the town of good cooks, good 
times, and good people!) 

BUTTERNUT SQUASH 

Betsy Winn 

2 pounds butternut squash, peeled, seeded 
and cut in cubes 

Cook 'til done In water and you should have 

three drained cups. 
Add to the cooked squash: 

1 stick oleo or butter 
2'/2 cups sugar 

2 Tablespoons flour 
'/? tsp. baking powder 

3 eggs 

1 Cup half and half cream 

Mix well and put In oblong casserole. Cook 'til 
firm and brown on top in 400 degree oven for 
25 to 30 minutes. This dish will put you In the 
"best cook" contest. 

(The recipe chairman, Virginia Hatcher, sub- 
mits her own recipe for: 

DIRTY RICE 



(The time comes when the cheese and crackers 

and cold cuts won't do It. You've got to cook 

something. The family needs a hot meal. Team 

up this rice dish with roast and salad and 

they've got It. And they'll be evermore glad they 

got It!) 

1 cup rice (uncooked) 

1 can onion soup 

1 can chicken broth 

1 stick oleo 

Combine rice, soup and broth In casserole. 
Chop oleo over top. Cover. Bake 325 degrees 
for one hour. 

HOMINY CASSEROLE 

Adelaide Mclnnis Jones 

1 cup hominy grits soaked In milk 12 hours 

1 can creamed corn 

1 can chopped ripe olives 

1 can mushrooms 

1 large can tomatoes 

Salt and pepper 

Saute: 

3 strips bacon-chopped 

1 lb. hamburger 

1 large onion, chopped 

garlic button 

Chopped green pepper 

Mix above together. Put In 12x18x2 casse- 
role. Let sit 24 hrs. If possible. Bake 1 hr. at 
400. Serves 10-12 

ASPARAGUS & ARTICHOKE CASSEROLE 

Margaret Ewing 

1 can asparagus 
1 jar artichoke crowns 
6 ozs. cream cheese 
Juice of a lemon 
Dram vegetables. 

Heat all together. Season to taste. Serve hot. 
Especially good with pork roast or ham. 



stiiliiiili 



Virginia Hatcher 



[Continued on next page] 

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RECIPES Continued 




Salads 

FRESH SPINACH SALAD 

Lynda Lee Stock 

(Many a mile has been driven through little side 
streets to an out-of-the-way crepes place where 
fresh spinach salad is served in a clear glass 
bowl ) 

1 lb of fresh spinach (Not New Zealand) 
Remove stems from spinach, wash it and dry it 

gently but thoroughly 
8 slices of bacon, chopped and cooked 
Reserve the bacon drippings 
1 large lemon— the juice, that is 

1 cup fresh mushrooms, washed, dried and 
sliced thin 

2 Tablespoons vinegar mixed with warm bacon 

drippings. 

Toss itall. Season to taste. If served in a large 
bowl, sprinkle lightly with parmesan cheese for 
garnish. 

ANGEL SALAD 



2 cups miniature marshmallows 
1 pint cottage cheese 

Dissolve gelatin in boiling water. Cool. Mix 
cheese, mayonnaise, whipped cream, pine- 
apple and marshmallows. Add to gelatin. Pour 
into molds. Chill until firm. 

TOMATO ASPIC 

Agnes Barry 

3 cups tomato juice 

1 cup chopped celery (fine) 
'/2 cup diced green pepper 
% cup diced pimento 

1 Tablespoon onion juice (or grated onion) 

2 Tablespoons lemon juice 
2 Tablespoons vinegar 

'/z Teaspoon paprika 

1 Teaspoon salt 

Few drops of Tabasco and a dash of cayenne 

pepper 

Let all above ingredients come to a boil. 
Dissolve 2 Tablespoons gelatin in 'A cup cold 
water. Add gelatin (dissolved) to boiled mix- 
ture Let the mixture cool and then pour into 
mold or oblong pyrex dish and congeal. Serve 
with mixture of cottage cheese and mayonnaise 
or plain mayonnaise. (Sometimes an extra 
envelope of gelatin can be put in if the aspic is 
going to be taken somewhere or served during 
hot weather.) 



Viva Hall Mclnnis 



2 pkg. lime Jello 

2 cups boiling water 

'/« cup mayonnaise 

Vi pint whipped cream 

1 large can pineapple, drained 



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CRANBERRY SALAD 

Selected 

1 C boiling water 
1 pkg. orange Jello 

1 can cranberry sauce (whole berries) 
Juice of '/2 lemon 

Small can pineapple chips 

Orange sections (1 large fresh orange) 

% C chopped pecans 

Stir together the boiling water and orange 
jello. Add cranberry sauce, then lemon juice, 
pineapple chips, orange sections and pecans. 
Mix well. Place in refrigerator to congeal. 

STRAWBERRY CREAM SQUARESA SALAD 

Sally Williamson 

2 three oz. pkgs. strawberry gelatin 

2 ten oz. cartons frozen strawtierries (sweet) 

1 13'/2 oz. crushed pineapple 

2 large ripe bananas, diced 
1 cup sour cream 

Dissolve gelatin in 2 cups boiling water. Add 
berries. Stir til berries are thawed. Add other 
fruit. 

Pour half of gelatin and fruit mixture into 
8x8x2 inch pan. Chill firm. Spread sour cream 
evenly over chilled mixture. Pour remaining 
gelatin mixture atop cream. Chill firm. 
COLESLAW 

Selected 

1 head cabbage, finely shredded 
% cup mayonnaise 

3 T sugar 

V/2 T wine vinegar 

1/3 cup oil 

1/8 tsp. each of garlic, onion, mustard and 

celery powders 
Dash black pepper 
1 T. lemon juice 
1/3 cup half and half cream 

[Continued on next page] 




RECIPES Continued 

'/4 tsp. salt 

Blend together mayonnaise, sugar, vinegar 
and oil. Add other ingredients, stirring until 
smooth. Pour over shredded cabbage and toss 
well. 



boiling water and you've got a real treat. 
NUTS AND BOLTS 

OR SCRABBLE 




Miscellaneous 

HOME MADE WINE 

Barbara Wright 

1 good balloon 

2 12 oz. cans frozen Welch's Grape Juice 

1 pl<g. Dry yeast 
3'/? cups sugar 

Stir all. Funnel into a gallon jug. Fill up jug 
with water almost to the neck. Tie a balloon 
over the neck of the jug. Place in a dark cabinet 
or closet. Do not disturb for 30 days. Balloon 
will inflate during the aging process. No kids or 
lighted cigarettes around the balloon, please. 
Delicious wine! 

INTERNATIONAL COFFEE MIX 

Adelaide Mclnnis Jones 

5 Tbs. Quik Nestles (chocolate flavor) 
4 Tbs. Cofteemate or Pream 

2 Tbs. instant coffee (Sanka preferred) 
1 Tbs. sugar 

More sugar can be added to make it sweeter. 
Keep this in a jar on the shelf for both the 
expected and that old bugaboo, the unexpect- 
ed. Put 2 heaping teaspoons in a large cup of 




We don't oKXTit yu to be 

a aOTHES HORSE, 
b«.t \A/t wa«t to dKsj 
lioum fine appwel from 
JAY'S MPRRJMFKT STORE 

UO N0(\rH SHBRPE AVeUikS 



Martha Mclnnis Martin 

1 box cherries 
1 box rice chex 
1 box pretzels 

1 pound pecans 
3 sticks oleo 

2 Tbs. garlic salt 
1 Tbs. savor salt 

1 Tbs. Lea & Perrins Worcestershire Sauce 
Canned shelled peanuts may be used in place 

of pecans or use both. Cook at 200 degrees for 

2 houis, stirring frequently. Let cool and then 
store in an air tight container (another search 
for one with a good lid). This is a good survival 
item. If you're remodeling the house, putting on 
a wedding, the stove's conked out or the 
television has taken a turn for the better, you 
can munch on this for several days and survive. 

VERSATILE DRESSING 

Anna Laura Conn 
(No, VERSATILE is not a new ingredient. It's 
that same old word and it means that this 
dressing is good on salads, as a dip, and 
absolutely delicious on boiled shrimp.) 
1 or 2 cloves garlic chopped fine 
Vi cup grated onion 
% cup Ketchup 
% cup chili sauce 
1 cup mayonnaise 
Vz cup Wesson oil 
1 teaspoon mustard 
pinch of salt 
1 Tsp. Worcestershire Sauce 

Dash of paprika, and black pepper and of 
Tobasco. Mix it all together. Put the oil in last. 
Find a good jar with a good lid and store it in 
fridge. 




COUGH SYRUP 

Squeeze a large lemon, strain it. 
Sweeten the juice with enough honey to make it 
palatable. 

Add a little whiskey, until syrup is even more 
palatable. 

Keep taking this until cough stops. If cough 

does not stop, call the doctor and give him 

some. Ask him where you made your mistake. 

BULGARIAN DRESSING 

Miss Viva 

1 pint Hellman's mayonnaise 

1 pint Bulgarian buttermilk 
'/2 tsp. salt 

Vz tsp. onion salt 
'/2 tsp. garlic salt 
Vz tsp accent 

2 tsp. parsley flakes 

1 tsp. lemon marinade 

Mix well together in bowl, pour into 2 pint jars 
(with good lids) and refrigerate. This will keep 
well in refrigerator for three months. It's good 
on any green salads, all boiled vegetables and is 
delicious on baked potatoes. 
(Ed. Note: This is a real goodie. It will dress up 
your meals. The receipe is from Mrs. Adiia 
Mclnnis of Rosedale.) 

HOT ARTICHOKE SPREAD 

Bessie 

1 14 oz. can artichoke hearts, drained & 

chopped into tiny pieces 
1 cup Hellman's mayonnaise 
1 cup Parmesan cheese 
Garlic powder to taste 
Worcestershire sauce to taste 
Dash of tobasco 

Mix all ingredients and put in a ramkin. Heat 
at 350 for 20 minutes or until mixture bubbles. 
Serve with Waverly crackers or fritoes for 
dipping. Serves 6. From a great Rosedale cook, 
Mrs. Jack Wood. 

(Ed. Note: Probably any brand mayonnaise 
[Continued on next page] 



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RECIPES Continued 

would do, but, let's face it, Hellman's is best). 
MEG'S MUSHROOM SOUP 

From South Boston, Virginia 

Vz pound fresh mushrooms, washed, dried & 
chopped 

1 small onion chopped 

2 cans chicken broth 
6 Tablespoons butter 

3 Tablespoons flour 
l'/2 C milk 

V? C cream 

Salt and pepper to taste 

2 Tablespoons sherry or vermouth 

Saute onions and mushrooms in 3 T butter. 
Add to this the two cans of chicken broth. 
Simmerabout 15 minutes. In another pan: Melt 

3 T butter, add and blend 3 T flour. Slowly add 
V/z C milk and cook on low heat until thickened. 
Add this cream sauce to the mushroom 
mixture. Keep hot and a few mintues before 
serving, add cream and sherry. 

(Fix a tasty salad to go with this and you have a 
lunch fit for a Queen. Add a ham sandwich and 
it'll do for the King himself.) Marguerite Ivy 
Cruse 

CHEESE & OLIVE PUFFS 

Bessie Bell 

(You're one in a million if you don't like olives. 

They seem to be a universal favorite.) 

Vz pound Cheddar cheese grated or shredded 

Vz cup butter softened 

1 cup all purpose flour, sifted 

Vz teaspoon salt 

1 teaspoon paprika 

jar of pimento-stuffed olives 

Mix all ingredients except olives. Roll in balls 
and put an olive in each ball. (Cover it well with 



There are many Swimming Poois 
BUT NONE CAN MATCH 

The all new space-age 

POLYNESIAN POOL 



dough) Bake in a 425 oven. Or freeze them and 
when you need them, bake in a 425 oven 
frozen. 

TOMATO JUICE COCKTAIL 

Mrs. Eddie C. Peacock 

1 large can tomato juice 

3 sticks celery, chopped 

Vi T Lea & Perrins Worcestershire 

2/3 T lemon juice and/or vinegar 

Vz onion, chopped 

1 med. bell pepper, chopped 

Vz C catsup 

1 t. sugar. 



Mix all ingredients. Season to taste with 
garlic salt and Tabasco. Be careful not to get too 
hot. Make 2 days ahead. Refrigerate. Strain to 
serve. Vegetables strained are excellent served 
with meal. 



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Beisvj Winn, Bobbie Doud, uane Roberson 




Grondmothers, you'll be tn seventh heaven ot Jane Baird's 
YOUNG ELITE. You'll find distinctive children's clothing 
there. Box 5!4, 529 Hwy. 82 E., Greenville. Ms.; phones 
378-3618 and 378-3530. 

See us ot MIERS & PRATT INSURANCE AGENCY for Auto. 
Fire. Wind. Boot, Commercial end Motor Homo 
INSURANCE. Greenville. Ms., phone 378-2003. 

Before you put your best foot forward, visit MARIE'S 
BEAUTY SALON where styles are created, not copied; 626 
McAllister. Greenville, Ms., phone 332-6811. 

Furs, sportswear, dresses, jewelry, accessories for 
women end children in G'ville at PLAY IT AGAIN, o reolly 
high quality re-sale shoppe of fine fashions. Open 9:30 to 
5:30 ond til 9 p.fn. Thursdays; 609 Hwy. 82 East, ph. 
335-2853. 

Look at SENOJ FURNITURE COMPANY on Washington 
Avenue in Downtown Greenville for handsome furnish- 
ings end occessories {especially lomps); Box 772, corner of 
Washington and Poplar, phone 332-5791. 

Buying? Selling? Whotever your needs ore in real estate, 
call SHARRON ABIDE REALTY at 335-0550 and/or 378-921 1 
or come by the office in the Village Shopping Center. 
Greenville. Ms. 

Greetings from RIVERSIDE DISTRIBUTORS. INCORPORATED 
of Budweiser, Michelob, and Busch. 730 Main Street. 
Greenville, Ms., phone 332-7259. 

Slay with us ot the DOWNTOWN MOTOR-HOTEL, 218 
Washington Avenue, in Greenville, Ms. Fine Food and 
lodging. Ask us about meeting and bonquet facilities — 
small intimate dinners to large dances. Phone 335-2661. 

In Lelond your real estate ond insuronce worries ore over 
if you'll go by the office of THOMAS INSURANCE AND REAL 
ESTATE. Have a talk with Jim "T" Thomas. Leiand. Ms.: 
phone 686-7974. 

GOOD CITIZENS Mr. and Mrs. T.K. Scott of Lelond send 
greetings to oil visitors to the Mississippi Delta. Ride 
nround Lelond and see o beautiful little town, 

On your way to the Great River Rood Park at Rosedole on 
Highway i stop by MICHAELS SUPER MARKET-right on 
Highwy 1-cnd load up. We carry fancy groceries, staples, 
fresh produce and meats — everything! Then. . . 
If you want to be a new you, come in MICHAEL 5 
DEPARTMENT STORE on Highway 1 ond let us dress you up 
in a new suit or dress. We carry the best lines. 



MRS. MARY L. BUCKEL5, a member of The United 
Daughters of the Confederacy, a promoter of historic 
preservation and a former resident of Bolivar County 
sends greetings to Delta friends and visitors from her 
residence in Greenville. 

M.O. AND NELL WHITESIDE KENT of Route 1, Rosedole. 
Ms. think all travelers should take in the sights olong 
Highway 1 between Gunnison and Rosedole. the sights 
being the flot land crops on each side of the rood. 
Gunnison has a gem of a library in the old depot. It is foil 
of local historical fact. 

Expert carpet installotion and custom made draperies con 
be yours just by picking up the phone ond dialing 378-8186 
forCHOATE FURNITURE COMPANY. INC. Complete home 
furnishings, graduate interior decorator service and 
Simmons mottresses await you at Choote's. 404 Highway 
1. South, Greenville. Ms. 

If you haven't already, go by Jimmie Ward's FASHION 
HOUSE. You'll find Tanner and those so-good dresses and 



suits. Hats, scarves and other accessories ore so pretty 
and varied, the right one must be there; 529 Hwy. 82 E. 
Greenville, 

Attention oil DAR's. State Magazine Chairman Mrs. Horry 
Word of Cleveland soys SUBSCRIBE TO THE DAR 
MAGAZINE. It's the greatest bargain you'll ever get in 
good reading. And it'll make the percentoges go up for 
Mississippi. 

Delberf Farmer of Benoit believes there is o RAINMAKER 
AND A RAINSTOPPER somewhere. If he (the Rainstopper 
and/or Rainmaker) reads this, ha should contact Mr. 
Farmer at Benoit, Ms. 

Right on Highway 82 East ot 723 and 729— Greenville, of 
course,— you'll find the LOUDON CHILDREN 5 SHOP AND 
THE LOUDON DRESS SHOP. Their rocks ore olwoys full and 
their clothes move fast. The foshions and selections are 
up-io-ihe- minute. 

GREETINGS from ST. LUKE'S ANGLICAN CHURCH of 

Greenville. Visitors welcome. Book of Common Prayer. 
1928, For further information phone 332-8863 or 332-2508. 

If you're in o hurry don't look in the window of McGRAW'S 
PASTRY SHOP OS you go by 902 Highway 82 Eost, 
Greenville, because you'll surety hove to moke a stop. On 
the inside, it's just as good as it looks in the window. If 
you've got a birthday, wedding or anniversary — this is 
where the coke is. Phone in your orders — 332-0257. 

For groceries of all kinds at good prices it's BING'S, INC. at 
the corner of Old Lelond Rood and 595 Highway 1 North, 
Greenville, Ms. Phone 378-9925. They're busy, but they 
keep the cashiers at the check-out registers. 

MR. AND MRS. HOWARD B. WHITE, 1500 Sandstone Drive. 
Apt. 303, Wheeling, III, send greetings from Glenbrook 
Ford in Glenview. Illinois. Mr, White, o former resident of 
Scott and Benoit. when asked for a recipe, said, "Tell my 
good friend. Billie Mills, thot I have run out of new recipes 
for anything — at my age it is oil re-runs". He used to be 
the best doncer in the Delta- -and probably is now the best 
one in Glenview. 

"When you core enough to send the very best" go to 
MARGARET'S HALLMARK SHOP in the Greenville Moll on 
Highoy 1 South in Greenville. Phone 335 9033, The cords 
ond writing supplies ore irresistible. Stock up! 

We do gel mod at them when their bill comes — But doesn't 
MISSISSIPPI VALLEY GAS COMPANY keep us worm in 
winter. They keep that gas coming. It's omozing how mony 
things we take for granted thot they keep going with it. 

Charlie and Mary VENTURA run o great restouront 
featuring tasty Italian food, seafood and steaks next door 
to Wolmort on Highway 1 at the Mainstream Moll, Open 
every doy except Sunday. Hot tomoles. too. Greenville. 

If it weren't for companies like HERCULES. INCORPORAT- 
ED. Farm Chemical Monufocturers at the Village Shopping 
Center in Greenville, you'd probably never see any cotton 
around the Delta. It's their chemicols that keep the weeds 
out. If it weren't for chemicals, weeds would be tc'ler than 
cotton. Then, what ever the weeds didn't get, the bugs 
v>ould. Phone them ot 335-1177. 

GIL WORTH TIRE COMPANY hos got something everybody 
needs sooner or later TIRES They hove o nice woiting 
room for service-while-u-woit. Quality tires. Courteous 
personnel. Just a little noisy. Phone 378-3131. G'ville. 

Whot did everybody eat before RETZER & RETZER? They 
brought McDonald's to Cleveland and Greenville— quorter 
pounder. Big Mac, French fried potatoes. Everything— 



quick and delicious! 



Clothing for the Gentleman at MANSOUR'S on Highway 1 
South. Phone 378-3000, Greenville. 

Now in its 55th yeor of service to its customers Is 
KOESTLER TILE COMPANY, contractors for ceramic tile, 
marble, tarrozzo, carpets, resilient flooring, marine 
decking and acoustic ceiling in residential, commercial, 
industrial and marine housing. On Highway 82 East. Box 
748, Greenville, Ms. 38701. Phone 601-332-2634. 

Today's casual cuts for men & women ot Betty's COMB 
CAROUSEL in the Hommett Building off Highway 82 in 
Greenville. Bio dry and glamour styling. A Redken Beouty 
Solon center. Phone 335-6224 

MRS. WALTER SILLERS of Rosedole sends greetings. Mrs. 
Sillers used to hear about the parties and dances at the 
Burrus House first hand from her parents, the late Senator 
ond Mrs. W.B, Roberts. Now owned by the Bolivor County 
Historical Society, the Burrus House might again be the 
scene of big doings. 

For sole or trode: AUTHENTIC. ANTIQUE CESSNA;130. only 
one in the world- Belongs to authentic antique Lody Pilot. 
Exciting point, well-rounded panel, cozy interior. Priced OS 
standard for antiques: Too High. Moke offer. No 
guarantee it will be occepted. Mrs. Frank McCormick, Box 
312. phone 453-6680. Greenwood, Mississippi. 

Lost-several unwanted pounds: If found, do not return 
to— EDWARD HESTER. 

The GREENVILLE ROTARY CLUB has a special oppreciotion 
for its two oldest attending members. E.H. WINN of 
Winterville and JOHN DAVIS of Greenville, both past 
presidents of the group. 

TOMMY and DALE McWILLIAMS of 506 East Percy Street in 
Indianolo send greetings ond welcome to all visitors to the 
Mississippi Delta 

Wonted. A new breed of cottle. Prefer one thot takes care 
of selves on cold, wet days and holidays. FRANK PEVEY. 

Wonted: Two partners in the bird dog business I will keep 
dogs from November through February, Partners split 
other months to suit themselves. Hurry. . .JAMES E. 
FRAZIER. JR. 

Compliments ot DELBERT and SUSAN WILLIAMS of Benoit, 
Ms. 

If you hove bugs (and lots of people do], coll ROGERS 
ENTOMOLOGICAL SERVICE. INC. at 843-5028. W© service 
Cleveland, Indianolo ond Charleston. 

CONDON'S EAST UNION at 1403 East Union in Greenville 
ond CONDONS FAIRVIEW PHARMACY ot 334 Foirview 
Avenue in Greenville ore family owned ond operated drug 
stores ond pharmacies. City wide delivery. Phone 
332-0941 for East Union and 332-7209 for the Foirview. 

Wanted: Wives who speak when spoken to. cook when we 
ore hungry, go no more often than necessary, bring home 
pay check and walk at least ten poces behind. THEY WILL 
KNOW. 

Part time job needed by young man soon to retire. 
Accustomed to a lorge salary. Hours must be minimum. 
LOUIE SKELTON. 

SHERMAN'S MEN'S WEAR offers the well-groomed look to 
Delta men and visitors. The two locations in Greenville 
ore in the Village Shopping Center ond Colony Square. 
Respective phones ore 332-2552 and 334-9954. 

From o tiny piece for o picture frome to on auto windshield 



[Continued on next page] 



CLASSIFIED Continued 



to patio doors and store fronts RHODEN'S GLASS SERVICE of pet supplies 
cop install it for you. Coll 332-0924. Rliodens at 1739 
Higfiwoy 82 East at Colorado in Greenville. 



Wanted: Models for Art Class. Subjects tfius for have been 
mostly old ond crocked. Rotfier still lifed. Would prefer 
deaf model as doss has lively conversations. JANE 
ROBERSON, 742-3351. 

For Sale: One coon dog. Worth $250. Will take $25. First 
offer. STEVE ADAMS, 742-3726. 

For Volkswagen, Mazda, AMC products, 4 Wheel Drive 
Jeeps— C-J5/CJ 7, the Cherokee, the Wogoneer and the 
Pickup— call JOHN HINKLE at 332-2653 at 3901 Highway 82 
East in Greenville, John Hinkle Volkswagen, Inc., Box 
5673. 



Lesson 


will 


beq 


ven 


on 


DESCRIPTIVE 


WORDS. 


Seporate 


dosses 


for 


men 


ond 


women. 


FREE. 


Call Dick 


Holmon, 


Benoit. 



















in conVmuous operation by the Nelken family since 1896, 
THE FAIR is Greenville's oldest "department store"— now 
lodies specialty with really appealing clothing. THE FAIR 
has survived floods and depressions and has grown with 
Greenville into four wonderful locations: THE FAIR at 
Greenville Moll. THE FAIR at Downtown Shopping Park. 
THE CONNECTION at Greenville Moll, and UNIFASHIONS 
at Greenville Mall. 

Since 1921 GREENVILLE-BUICK-CADILLAC-PONTIAC CO. 
has been supplying quality cars to Deltans. They invite 
visitors OS well as residents of the great Mississippi Delta 
to stop by their showroom at 522 Washington Ave. 
Greenville. 

THE SHAW LUMBER COMPANY hos all kinds of building 
materiols. At Show, Miss, its address is Box E, Shaw. The 
phone number is 754-3231 . The zip is 38773. Guy Simpson 
is owner-operotor and is a cypress specialist. As anyone in 
Shaw can tell you. Mr. Simpson is a good egg, too. He 
gove the lumber for porch (60 ft. by 12 ft.) for old Burrus 
Home in Benoit. 

THE STORK AND TOT SHOP in the Mainstream Mall in 
Greenville carries the finest lines of clothing for the 
carriage set through small fry years. "We Major In Minors" 
is their very opt slogan. Phone 332-2369. 

MRS. GORDON L. HOUSE of Metcolfe sends best wishes 
for the success of the Delta Tour Guide and Picture Book. 

LIL AND JIMMY DUNN OF GREENVILLE soy "Welcome to 
the Delta" to visitors and tourists. 

If your dry cleoning needs personal attention and reol 
care, take it to MOSLEY CLEANERS on Highway 82. 
Stubborn spots don't stond a chonce there. 

No need to sit around wishing for pretty clothes. THE 
WISHING WELL ot 207 Second Street in Shelby has the 
latest fashions. It's o popular spot with Deito gals ond 
their moms. Phone 398-3881 , 

GOOD GRIEF. MISSISSIPPI could not afford to get a big 
town ad because the tax business is not too good. They did 
manage this, though: GOOD GRIEF-At the loot of the 
levee^population: 5 — Also: 2 dogs, 3 cots and 1 old 
Grouch. 

The MODERN BEAUTY SHOP at 401 West Sunflower in 
Cleveland, Mississippi is one of the town's oldest. 
Sometimes they simply make the ladies pretty; at other 
times they perform miracles. Coll either Mary C. Hartley. 
Avo Bootwright, or Mamie Barron at phone 843-5366. 

Greetings from MRS. L.B. AUSTIN in Rosedale. 

MR. AND MRS. W.M. CARTER of Rosedale send greetings 
to all fellow Deltans and visitors to this greot section of 
Mississippi. 

MR. AND MRS. JOHN WILLIAM LEWIS AND MRS. FLETCHER 
LEWIS of Rosedale send greetings from one Bolivar 
County's oldest drugstores, LEWIS' DRUGSTORE in Rose- 
dale. 

Quit fighting it. Stop by SHIPLEY'S DO-NUTS at J021 
Washington Avenue in Greenville ond get o couple of 
dozen. They're fresh and delicious. And there's another 
location at 1401 Highway I South. Many fresh baked 
items. 



GREENVILLE TENT & AWNING has been out on Highway 82 
East almost forever. Tarpaulins, boot covers, canvas, 
neophrene, nylon, vinyl, stock size or custom fitted. Phone 
332-7083. 1729 Hwy. 82 E., Greenville, Cushions any size. 

Stop by and visit the REVELATION CHRISTIAN BOOK & GIFT 

SHOP in the Moinstream Mall in Greenville. Ms. The 

phone number is 332-3440. 

Greetings from DR. PETE WALKER of Delta State University 

at Cleveland. He is on extraordinary photogropher and his 

classics can be bought at a few spots in the Delta. Better 

buy it then ond there if you see one you like. 

JR. ELIZABETH WOODWARD of the School of Nursing of 

Delta State University sends best wishes to visitors and 

fellow Deltons. 

SOUTHLAND KENNELS at 60 Tate Road has AKC Registered 
puppies Call Billie Sue Boker at phone 335-6717 for your 
pet needs. All this in Greenville, Miss. 

From the catfish capital and the largest county in the Delta 
come greetings from W.H. ALLEN, a resident of Belzoni, 
Mississippi. Many historic places down Belzoni woy. 



L 



From the north part of Bolivar County at Shelby, WAYNE 
THOMPSON sends a hello and welcome to Delta visitors. 



FOR SALE: One fine coon dog named "PoJo", so fast we 
hod to break his leg to keep him from getting to the tree 
before the coon. Call HILLIARD LAWLER, Rosedole, Miss, 



Officers of the SHELBY LIONS CLUB ore Richord 
Westbrook, president: Malcolm Fullilove, secretary & 
treosurer: Lorry Swanson ond John Denton, vice-presi- 
dents; E. Bornett, toil twister; Pat Denton, Lion tamer; ond 
Directors Johnny Gordon, WE. Adams, Jim Davis, and 
Howord Franklin. 

Richard Myers is president of the CLEVELAND EXCHANGE 
CLUB. First vice-president is Jim Irvin with Bobby Moore 
the second vice-president. Dan McQuogge is secretary. 

The ROSEDALE EXTENSION HOMEMAKERS CLUB is on 
award winning group. In 1978, they picked up a first place 
in city beoutificotion: in 1977, o first place for the 
scrapbook The Farm Bureau hos singled the group out for 
honors. They take port in oil community offoirs: 
beoutificotion, library. Scouts, Little League ond they 
sponsor o girl to Girls' Stote. 

After you leove Hollondale on Hwy. 61, when you go 
through Ponther Burn before you get to Anguilla, start 
looking for HENRY PHELPS ANTIQUE SHOP at Nitto Yumo. 
The very old building, right on the highwoy, to be an 
antique shop and museum will be open by 1979 probobly. 
Dorothy & Henry Vick Phelps, who live in o mansion on the 
highway right at Nitto Yumo, hove beautiful antiques. 
When the two tour guide staff members rounded the 
corner of the monsion. two furious dogs come out 
charging to meet them. As the staffers in their high heels 
ran for the cor, a small block boy. high on o lodder 
painting the columns and helpless to help, yelled down to 
reassure them, "Don't but one of them bites". Coll 
873-4000 to see the antiques. 

Headed for Jockson? Stop by Highland Villoge in North 
Jockson off Highway 55 and visit THE CHOPPING BLOCK 
where the gourmet cooks will hove o field day with oil 'he 
utensils and kitchen accessories. And the display counters 
ore antiques. The proprietress is Jonelie Gonier, o former 
resident of Hollondale. 

Everyone needs a truck — new. used, big or little — it 
mokes no difference. You need something to haul your 
things around in. Just think of how much more you could 
buy with a truck to houl it in. Get o GMC from RUSSELL 
MOTORS, 401 Highoy 1 North. Phone 378-9077, Greenville. 

Do you wont to buy or sell some reol estote? Go talk to 
Mock Payne at ML. PAYNE REAL ESTATE & FARM LANDS. 
Phone number 335-9698. Greenville He knows the Delto 
like the bock of his hand. He's probobly got something 
there you don't know you need — so coll him. 
DR. AND MRS. ROBERT E. BLEDSOE of Greenville extend 
greetings to visitors and fellow Deltans. 

Greetings to fellow Deltons and visitors from MR. AND 
MRS LEROY PERCY of Greenville. 



R06B1NS(£LOMG FARMS 

ROSFDHLE.lViS. 

pV\76"'?-35"q6 

-Rltt,KH]0H,S0y6Jlllfi(gWffifll 
S.(;WW«0B8INS£CDUWmNg 

p r e s e nt 

o? ftRCHWL-S (J HISTORY 
cu/)o ooorh for historic, 
prtieyi/atcbn ca th^ 
State af mfssiss'ipp't 

ail 




Seoted: Patti Block, Charlotte Capers, Dawn Maddox. 
Standing: Bob Bailey ond Elbert Hllliard. 




Phone 335-9668 in Greenville to get in touch with WHITT'S 
PET SHOP on Highwoy 1 South. Ask for Mr. or Mrs. Billy 
Whitt. Registered puppies, birds, fish, and complete stock 



ORDER BLANKS 

Date. 
TO: DELTA GUIDE 
Mrs. George Stock III 
Rt. 1 Box 73 
Hollandale, Mississippi 38748 

Enclosed is my check or money order for $ 



Send me copies of your book at Sr S .OQ per copy (This includes postage). 

Name 

Street 

City State 



ORDER BLANKS 

Date_ 
TO: DELTA GUIDE 
Mrs. George Stock III 
Rt. 1 Box 73 
Hollandale, Mississippi 38748 

Enclosed is my check or money order for $ 



Send me copies of your book at $^ .00 - per copy (This includes postage). 

Name 

Street 

City State 



ORDER BLANKS 

Date_ 



TO: DELTA GUIDE 

Mrs. George Stock III 

Rt. 1 Box 73 

Hollandale, Mississippi 38748 

Enclosed is my check or money order for $_ 



Coo 

Send me copies of your book at $D.O Q- p er copy (This includes postage). 

Name 

Street ^ 

City - State 



Able, Mr. and Mrs. Fred 

Adams, Dr. & Mrs. Jim 

Adams, Mr. & Mrs. William 

Allen, William 

Arceneaux. Mr. & Mrs. R.D. 

Arnold, Mr, & Mrs, W,D. 

Ashley, Mrs, E.J, 

Atkinson, Mr & Mrs, Asa 

Austin, Mrs. Zoe 

Aylward, Mr. & Mrs. Francis 

Bagley. Mr. & Mrs. Edwin D. 

Bailey, Mr. & Mrs. Dexter 

Bank of Benoit 

Bank of Clarksdole 

Bank of Cleveland 

Bank of Shelby 

Barlow, Mr- & Mrs. Wesley 

Barry, Mrs. Maggie Burrus' 

Bank of Bolivor County, Shelby 

Barry, Copt. & Mrs. T.M. 

Benoit Gin 

Barefield. Mrs. R,A. 

Barry. Mr. & Mrs. EM. 

Beodel. Mr. & Mrs. Dan 

Beddingfield, Mr. & Mrs. Luther 

Belenchia. Paul L. 

Bell, Mrs. Bessie W. 

Beta Gommo Book Club 

Bilbo. Mr, & Mrs. George 

Bird & Son 

Bizzell, Judge & Mrs, William 

Blakemon, Mr. & Mrs, Sonny 

Blocker. Mr. & Mrs. Morris 

Bobo. Mr. & Mrs- J.E. 

Bogy, Mr. & Mrs. Ben 

Bolivar Commercial 

Bolivar Insurance Agency 

Boiling, Mrs R.A. 

Bologna. Dr. & Mrs. Nino A. 

Boschert, Mr. & Mrs, Thomos N. 

Bostick Brothers 

Bostick, Mr, & Mrs. J. A. 

Boswell, Mr. S Mrs, William S., Jr. 

Bowen, Congressman David 

Boyd. Mr. & Mrs. Edgar 

Boykin, Mr, & Mrs. Hubert 

Brent, Mr. & Mrs. Howard 

Brent, Mr. & Mrs. Jesse 

Broodfoot. Mr & Mrs Wolter 

Brower, Mr & Mrs Steve 

Brumby, Miss Carol 

Bryan, Mr. & Mrs. John H. 

Bryant, Mr. & Mrs, F.C.. Jr. 

Buckles, Mr. & Mrs. Douglas 

Buckles, Mrs Mary L 

Bullord, Mr. & Mrs. Lyndel 

Burns. Mr, & Mrs. Jomes F. 

Burroughs, Mr. & Mrs. Dick 

Butler, Dr. Maria H. 

Byrd, The Rev. and Mrs. Glen 

Byrd. Mark 

Byrd, Mike 

Caldwell, Mrs. Jim 

Company, Mr & Mrs. A.N., Jr. 

Campbell, Mr, & Mrs. John 

Conody. Mr, & Mrs. Loyd 

Capps Insurance 

Cash, Dr. & Mrs, William 

Castle, Miss Gladys C. 

Chombers, Loyd 

Childs, Mr and Mrs. Stanley 

Chism. Mr, & Mrs. Jos. F. 

Chudy, Mr. & Mrs. Wendell 

Clark, Miss Pauline 

Clarksdole Press-Register 

demons, Mr. & Mrs. James 

Cleveland Lumber Company 

Cleveland State Bonk 

Coahoma Bonk 

Clifton, Mr. & Mrs. Homer 

Coghlon, Mr. & Mrs, Charles 

Coleman. Mr & Mrs, Ed 

Collier, Mr & Mrs. Charles 

Collins, Dr. & Mrs. Harry 

Conger. Mr & Mrs Ben 

Cope. Mr. & Mrs. Duncan 

Commerclol Notional Bank, Greenville 

Congreve, Mr & Mrs Ralph 

Costonzi. Mr & Mrs_ David A. 

Couch, Mr. & Mrs Phillip 

Council. Mr & Mrs, Harold 

Cox. Mr & Mrs. Gwin 

Criss. Mrs. G.D., Jr 

Crump, Mr. & Mrs, Brodie 

Dohncke. Calvin L 

Dokm, Mr S Mrs. Matt 

David. Mr, & Mrs. W J, 

Dottel, Mr. & Mrs, Mickey 

Daughters of the American Revolution. Madam 

Hodnett Chopter 
Davis, Mrs. Rhea S 
Dean, Mr, & Mrs Charles 
Deon, Mrs CO, 
DeLooch, Mr & Mrs Corl 
Delta Implement 
Denton, Mr & Mrs. G.D. 
Denton. Mr and Mrs, Jock 
Denton. Mr & Mrs, Jock, Jr. 
Delta & Pine Lond 
Deposit Guoronty Notionol Bonk, Greenville 



MRS. BEN BOGY, CHAIRMAN 

ROSEDALE, MISSISSIPPI 

FRIENDS OF THE BURRUS HOUSE 

HOLLYWOOD PLANTATION 

BENOIT. MISSISSIPPI 



DePriest, Mr. & Mrs. Joe 

Dodd, Mr & Mrs. Robert 

Dossett, Mr. & Mrs. Dixon 

Downing, Mr. & Mrs. James D. 

Dunlop, Mr. & Mrs. Ellis 

Dreher. Mr. & Mrs. Roy D. 

Dreher, Mr. & Mrs. Roy 

Eddins, Mr. & Mrs. Joe 

Ervin, Mrs, Gladys 

Evans. Mr. & Mrs. Fred, Jr. 

Ewing. Mrs. Early. Sr, 

Ewing, Mr, & Mrs. Early, Jr. 

Ewing, Mr. & Mrs. Tommy 

Fancher, Mr, & Mrs, Bobby 

Formers Tractor & Supply Co., Greenville 

Fowcett, Mr, David 

Finger, Mr. 8 Mrs. J.E. 

First National Bonk of Bolivar County, Cle 

First Notional Bonk of Coahoma County, 

Clarksdole 
First National Bonk, Greenville 
First National Bonk. Rosedale 
Fowler, Mr. & Mrs. Cotton 
Frozier, Mr. & Mrs. James 
Frome, Mr. & Mrs. J. Stewart 
Mississippi Power & Light Co., Greenville 
Garrett, Mrs. Frances J. 
Gory. Mrs Claudine 
Gonzoles, Dr. John Edmond 
Goodson, Miss Gerry 
Gourloy, Mr. & Mrs. Will 
Gray, Mr. & Mrs. Minor 
Graham, Mr. S Mrs. Charles 
Green, Dr. & Mrs. George 
Green, Mr. & Mrs. George III 
Gullett, Mrs. Valeria Collier 
Groham, Chip 

Grissom, Mr. & Mrs. Perrin H. 
Gunn, Dr. & Mrs. Jock W. 
Hofter, Mrs. Jerome 
Hoire, Mr. S Mrs, Oscar 
Hammond, Mr. & Mrs, Woody, Jr. 
Haros, Mr, & Mrs. Bill 
Harris, Mr, & Mrs, Edward 
Horkins, Mr. & Mrs. David 
Hatcher, Mr, & Mrs. J.L. 
Heidel, Mr. & Mrs. Jimmie 
Hendon, Mr. & Mrs. John 
Hendricks, Mrs. Vashti Low 
Henry, Mr. & Mrs. A.V. 
Herbert, Mr. & Mrs. J.C. 
Herbert. MR. 

Herbison, Mr. & Mrs. James Allen 
Hester, Mr. & Mrs. Austin 
Hester, Mr. & Mrs, Edward 
Hester, Mr. & Mrs. Tim 
Hewins, Mr. & Mrs. Dan 
Hiter, Mr. & Mrs. Richard 
Hogue, Mrs. Eodes 
Hogue. Mr. and Mrs. Ralph 
Hogue, Mr. & Mrs. Reed 
Hollingsworth. Dr. & Mrs. R.T. 
Holman, Mr. & Mrs. Dick 
Holmes, Charles W. 
Howorth, Mr, & Mrs. J.M. 
House, Lovolle 
Huddleston, Mrs, Doris 
House, Mrs. Helen Clark 
Hughes, Mr. & Mrs. Lester 
Hunsucker, Mr. & Mrs. Charles 
Jackson. Mrs J.F. 
Jocobs, Mr, fi Mrs. Charles, Jr. 
Jocobs, Mrs Vera 
Jomes, Sherman, Jr. 
Jay's Department Store 
Johnson, Mr, & Mrs. Fontaine 
Jones, Mrs. Alice K. 
Jones. Donny 
Jones. Dr. & Mrs, Keith 
Jones, Mrs. Peg Sutherlond 
Jordon, Mr. & Mrs. Roy 
Komien, Mr. & Mrs. t.A, 
Kazan. Elio 
Kellner, Mrs. Ernest 
Kellum, Mr. & Mrs. Stacy 
Kent, Mr, & Mrs. M.O. 
Kimble. Mr, & Mrs, R,V.. Jr. 
King, Mr & Mrs. Jimmy 
King. Mr, & Mrs. Louis 
King, Mrs. Mourine B. 
Koenig, Mr & Mrs. Joke 
Kossmon, Mr & Mrs. Ed, Jr. 
Kretschmor, Mrs. L S. 
Lamar. Dr. & Mrs. Curt 
Lancaster, David 
Langston. Mr. & Mrs. Jim T. 
Latham, Mrs. Alice 
Latham, Mr. & Mrs. WW. 
Low, The Rev & Mrs Ashley T. 
Lowler, Mr & Mrs Hilliord 
Lenoir, Dr. & Mrs. Leon. Jr. 
Leveck, Mr, & Mrs, Henry H. 



Leveck, Misses Josephine & Bernice 
Levingston, Mr. & Mrs. Faye Stanley 
Levingston, Jacks, Levingston ond Land 
Lindsey, Mr. & Mrs. E.C. 
Littleton, Mr, & Mrs. Kermit 
Litton, Mr. & Mrs Mike 
Long, Mr & Mrs. James 
Lowe, Mr. & Mrs Jimmy 
Mollord. Carl Roy 
Molone, Mrs, R.C. 
Martin, Mrs. Mclnnis 
Motthews, Mr, & Mrs. Rink 
Moxey, Mr. & Mrs. Thomas 
Maxwell, Mrs. Isobell R. 
Maxwell, Mr. & Mrs. Jomes 
Michoel. Mr. and Mrs. Lottimore 
Mills, Mr. & Mrs, Garland 
/eland Mills, Mr. g Mrs, S.E. 

Miss. Delta Rice Growers, Inc. 

Mitchell, A.M. 

Mitchell. Mr, & Mrs. Ned 

Mixon. Mr, & Mrs. J.W, 

Montgomery, Dr. & Mrs D.C. 

Moore, Mr, & Mrs. Bobby 

Moore, Mr. & Mrs, Vordaman 

Morgon, Mr, & Mrs, Adiia 

Mostkoff, Miss Louise 

Myers, Mr, & Mrs. Walt 

McCaskill, Mr. & Mrs. Oliver 

McCaskill, Robert P. 

McCaskill. Thomas L. 

McCaslin, Mr. & Mrs, Henry 

McCormick, Mrs. Peggy 

McGee, Miss Julia 

McGregor, Mr. & Mrs. P.K. 

Mcllwoin, Mrs, Lou 

Mclnnis, Mrs. AdIia 

Mcintosh, Mr & Mrs. Robert 

Nosh, Jere B., Sr. 

Neol, John, Jr. 

Nelson, Mr. & Mrs. Charlie 

Newton, Mr. & Mrs. James 

North, Mr. & Mrs. L.D. 

Nowell. Mr. & Mrs. Jock 

Nunan, The Rev, & Mrs. T. Russell 

O'Bannon, Mrs. Fred 

Outzen, Mr. & Mrs. Richard 

Owen, Mrs. Lee 

Owen, Dr. & Mrs, Lee 

Owens. Mrs. Rolph 

Paden, Mrs. Frank 

Pork. Mr. & Mrs. Marlowe, Sr. 

Parker, Mr. & Mrs. Bill 

Parkinson, Mr. & Mrs. John, Jr. 

Potterson. Mr. & Mrs, Pot 

Payne, Mr. & Mrs. Billy 

Payne, Mr. & Mrs. Hugh G. 

Pearson, Mrs. John 

Pearson. Mr. & Mrs. John, Jr. 

Person, Mrs. Jane B. 

Planters Bonk & Trust Company, Greenv 

Planters Equipment Co. 

Powell, Mr. & Mrs. Jimmy 

Powell, Mrs. May K. 

Roy, Mr. & Mrs. Ralph 

Redden, Mr. & Mrs. W.S. 

Reed, Mr. & Mrs. Bill 

Retzer, Mr, & Mrs. Michael 

Richard, Mr. & Mrs. Purvis 

Richardson, Mr. & Mrs. C.J., Jr. 

Roberson, Andy 

Roberson. Mr. & Mrs. Jomes 

Robertson, Mr, and Mrs. W.T. 

Robinson, Mr. & Mrs. Joe 

Rogers, Mr. & Mrs. Mills 

Ross, Mr. & Mrs, Joe 

Sanders, Mr. and Mrs. Jimmie 

Sotterfield, Mr. & Mrs, Travis 

Schuh, Mr. & Mrs, Pot 

Scott. Mrs. Oscor 

Scott, Mr. & Mrs. George 

Scott, Mr. and Mrs. Winfield 

Sessums, Mr. & Mrs. Shelby 

Shonds. Mrs. A.W. 

Show, Mr. & Mrs. CM. 

Shelby, Mr, & Mrs. Dick 

Sillers. Mrs. Walter 

Simpson, Miss Grady 

Simpson. Mr. & Mrs, Guy 

Simpson, Mr, & Mrs. Jimmy 

Simpson, Mr. & Mrs. M,C 

Skelton. Mr, & Mrs. Bill 

Skelton, Mr, & Mrs. Emer/ 

Skinner. Mrs. Chop 

Sledge. Mr. & Mrs. H.L. 

Sledge, Mr. & Mrs, Nevin 

Sledge, Mr & Mrs. Wilson 

Smith, Mr. & Mrs, Milton 

Smith, Mr. & Mrs Charles 

Smith, Mr. & Mrs B.F, 

Smith, Mr. & Mrs. J.C 

Smith, Mrs. Marvin 



Smith. Mr. & Mrs. Warwick 

South Central Bell 

Speokes. Mr. & Mrs. Charles 

Spencer, Mr & Mrs. Curtis 

Sprogins. Mr. & Mrs. Sonny 

Stein. Mr. & Mrs, Bernard 

Stock, Mr, & Mrs, George III 

Stout, Mr, & Mrs. W.F, 
Attvs ^^''O^qe, Mrs. Joseph E. 
^ ' Stubbs, Mr & Mrs. Roy W. 

Sutherland, Col. & Mrs. Charles F. 

Sutherland, Dr. Charles F. 

Sutherland. Mr. John Burrus 

Sutherlond, Miss Louise 

Speakes, Miss Julio 

Terry, Robert J. 

Thomos, Mr. & Mrs. Allen 

Thomas, Mrs, Beatrice 

Thomas, Mr & Mrs W.M. 

Thomos, Mr. & Mrs, David 

Thomas, Mr. & Mrs. Leroy 

Thompson, Mr. & Mrs. Terry 

Treloor, Mr. S Mrs. Moyie 

Trout, Mr. & Mrs Tom Roy 

Tucker, Mr, & Mrs. H.C 

Union Service Industries, Inc. 

Unkel. Mr, & Mrs. Frank 

Utz. Mr. & Mrs. John 

Valentine, Mr. S Mrs. Cormon E. 

Valley Bank. Rosedole 

Vetrono. Miss Susan 

Willey, W. Howard 

Wolker. Mr. & Mrs, Aubrey 

Wolker, Mrs. James C 

Wolloce, The Rev. & Mrs. H.G. 

Wollis, Mrs. Lowell 

Walker, Mr. & Mrs Byron 

Ward. Mr. & Mrs. Calvin 

Ward, Mr, & Mrs. R,M. 

Worfield, Mr. and Mrs. Scott 

Worthen, Mr. & Mrs. George 

Washington Federal Savings & Loon, Greenvil 

Wosson, Ben 

Weathers. Mr. & Mrs. Bill 

Weilenmon, Mr. & Mrs. Joe 

Welch, Mrs, Mike 

West, Mr, & Mrs. Clayton 

West. MR. & Mrs, John D, 

Wheeler, Mr. & Mrs. Nott 

White, Mrs. Estelle Fox 

White. Mr. 8 Mrs. Howard B. 

Whitfield. Mrs. Clinton Brooks 

Whittington. Mr. & Mrs. R.P. 

Wiggins, Mr. & Mrs. Lorry 

Wilkerson, Mr. & Mrs. Jeff 

Williams, Mr. & Mrs. Charles 

Williams. Mrs. Jimmy 

Williamson, Mr. & Mrs. Bilbo 

Williomson, Mr. & Mrs. E. Buford 

Williomson, Mr. & Mrs. Gervys 

Williamson, Mr. & Mrs. Stanley 

Wilson, Mr & Mrs, Brother 

Wilson, Mr. & Mrs Charles 

Wilson. David 

Wilson, Mr. & Mrs. Ed 

Wilson, Mr. & Mrs. Frank 
[l^ Wilson, Mrs. H.R. 

Wilson. Mrs, Lawrence 

Wilson. Pat 

Winn, MR. & Mrs. Eustace 

Winn, Dr. & Mrs. Eustace, Jr. 

Winn, Mr. & Mrs. Hal E. Ill 

Wolfe, The Rev. & Mrs. Forest P. 

Woman s Federated Club 

Young, Mrs, Soroh Porter 

Young, Mr. & Mrs. Peter. Jr. 

Youngblood. Mrs. W.C 

•DECEASED 




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